Grizzly 10" Slow Speed Wet Grinder

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leehljp

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Originally, I posted most of this on a woodworking forum, and then thought that it might be beneficial to some here.

About 3 years ago, I bought the Grizzly 10” slow speed wet grinder on sale while I was in Springfield, MO visiting my daughter. It has been setting on a bench in a corner since then - until a few weeks ago.

10" Wet Grinder Kit - Anniversary Edition | Grizzly Industrial

(Background- When I was in Japan, I had equal tools there that I have here (USA). When I returned and brought most of my tools back, my shop here was so filled with tools and boxes that there was not enough space to work inside.) I had enough space overall, but with three daughter’s worth of excess furniture and items stored in half the shop, I had almost no room for work. Last summer, I made my girls get or get rid of their “memories” items. Then some of my excess tools, I gave away to my son-in-laws. Since last fall, I have had room in which to work - except the shop was unheated and un-air conditioned. The shop was two rooms, and one room, the one with my daughter’s storage items had heat and AC. After I got THAT room cleaned out, it needed some floor repair. I finished it and began transitioning my two lathes to the heated room, along with my scroll saw, drill press, work table and small tool storage area.)


Well, I have my lathes in place and am ready to turn some pens and bowls in a room of comfortable temperature. (I did sporadic turning in the unheated and uncooled room over the past 6 years.) And, Most of my tools are comparatively dull now. I have used the scary sharp method of keeping my lathe tools sharp. But they all need a refresh grinding. I pulled out the Grizzly grinder, added water to the tray and let it run for about 10 minutes and added more water.

I put my favorite (custom made) scraper chisel (HSS) and set it to the angle that I wanted. I discovered what a “slow” grinder is - SLOW.  It took me about 7 to 8 minutes to take the face down to a complete concave grind side to side and bottom to top. After a complete re-grind, It wasn’t that sharp, IMO, but it was a complete grind on the face. I liked the wide stone and I moved the scraper back and forth in a slow motion with moderate pressure. The chisel was clamped into the guide and the guide slid side to side easily. The water coming over kept everything completely cool.

Next, I added some paste to the leather wheel and honed it for about 1 minute. It still did not feel completely sharp to touch. I had expected this from both experience before and from reading a few years ago about the proper way to sharpen, even with a Tormek. I read an article (about the Tormek) and how one professional said the Tormek was not the end all in shapening. Honing was needed AFTER using a Tormek. I also knew that honing paste was usually still too course for precision sharpening. So, after using the honing paste and leather wheel, I pulled out my scary sharp .2?micron sand paper and honed it 4 or 5 swipes - and suddenly - WOW. I could FEEL the difference from before and after. I know what the scary sharp method feels like with sharp, but this brought it up a WHOLE notch.

The clamp guide gave great alignment to the chisel, the concave grind allowed for easier honing, the honing got the edge into shape and the scary sharp .2micron sandpaper produced a sharpness with ease that I have not felt before, even when using the scary sharp system previously many times.

Back to the Grizzly - I may be wrong, but I feel the lack of heat generated because it was using a water wheel and the water was 100% running over the grind at all times, the HSS grind held its hardness. This hardness is lost during heated grinds, and even slow speed 1750rpm grinders can cause temp problems on the finer edges. (I am forgetting the correct term at the moment). Anyway, the slow speed water wheel did a fantastic job of getting the correct alignment for the tool. I can’t wait until I have time to sharpen all of my chisels and even knives.

The sharpening process is noticeably slower than even using a slow 1750rpm grinder because the Grizzly wet grinder is 110RPM. This took a little mental adjustment on my part. I have a VS Delta grinder (2000 - 3450) and it is faster for sure, but it does generate heat. Going down to a 110rpm does take more time to get the edge right, but it sure does a super job.

I feel like I have found a new best friend in my shop! I spent most of "President's Day" grinding a face on a large wood chisel set that I got when I was in Japan. And following up with the scary sharp honing. Fantastic. I can use them now.

When I got my grizzly 10" grinder, there were a few posts on the this forum (IAP) about slow speed grinder bushings and how the right bushings would make a huge difference in its performance. I didn't have those bushings but in searching and reading on the issue, I took my grinder and set it up. I put a stand with a reference point next to the wheel and would tighten the wheel very snug and then rotate. It did have a small wobble. I would loosen the nut, hold the shaft and rotate the wheel about 1/8 of a turn; tighten the nut and do the same. I put marks on the wheel and on the shaft. It took me about 30 minutes but I learned where the shaft and wheel seemed to be balanced the best with the least amount of wobble. I didn't need the special bushings although I would like to have a pair. When I sharpened the lathe chisel, I looked for minute' amounts of wobble but I could not detect any with my eyes or through feel of sharpening the blade.

Just in case you or anyone else would like to know about the slow grinder bushings, here is the link: https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p...ng-2-Piece-Set

One more thing: There are CBN wheels available for the Tormek and Grizzly and I am sure they would be great. However the CBN wheels themselves cost more than the Grizzly Slow speed grinder. For $140.00 plus shipping, the Grizzly slow speed wet grinder is a great tool.
 
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Curly

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Glad you're happy with your wet grinder. I'll correct you on one thing you said. HSS is not affected by grinding temperatures you would normally reach. It came into being in the metal industry to hold it's edge sharpness even when red hot. What is detrimental to the edge is when you do get it hot and dip it into cold water to cool it off. The thermal shock cause micro-cracks in the metal and it will loose it's edge quickly as they break off. So don't worry about getting it hot, just set it aside until it air cools. Even if it discolours it is not going to affect the edge.

Where heating the edge is a problem is when the metal is a high carbon steel, like your Japanese chisel or is an old turning tool. When it gets hot the edge turns blue and looses hardness. That has to be ground out to get to hard metal once more. The wet grinder keeps the edge cool all the time so blueing the edge should never be an issue.

On your Delta grinder if you have the right wheels in it and dress it often then the heat buildup problem is minimal.
 

leehljp

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Feb 6, 2005
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Thanks Curly, for the clarification. I am learning a lot: Don't put HSS in water to cool. Didn't know that. The slower speed does allow me more control than faster speed. I tend to ruin things going too fast. Sneaking up on shape and sharp is better for me.

The grinder did a fantastic job on my $1000+ worth of Japanese chisels. Actually they were a gift, so they didn't cost me.
 
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Wildman

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Jan 12, 2008
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Jacksonville, NC, USA.
When you grind you HSS turning tools on a high/slow speed dry grinder you don’t want to quench your tools in water; just air cool to avoid metal fracturing. In commercial application HSS tool cooled with water/oil mix while in operation.
While HSS steel can tolerate some bluing it’s not a good practice will get some metal fracturing also. If just use light touch at the grinder touching up an edge tool shouldn’t get so hot.

Biggest advantage wet grinder have over dry grinders is smoother bevels. Supposedly edges stay sharper longer. Fellow named Lyn J. Mangiameli wrote some excellent articles for Fred Holders, “More Woodturning Mag,” many years ago extolling benefit of wet over dry grinders. Lyn provided very technical details in plain language easy to understand. Here is an example cannot find the article really wanted to post:

WoodCentral Articles & Reviews

I don’t strive for scary sharp on my turning tools and don’t spend a lot of time at my dry bench grinder live by an old cliché when in doubt sharpen your tool. For scrappers think just burnishing the burr reduces amount of time between going to grinder.

Think resharpening times on dry versus wet grinder depends on turner, my way of saying both get the job done. In perfect world turners should have both unless switch to CBN wheels.
 

Dehn0045

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Mar 19, 2017
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Houston, Texas
I have the Grizzly 10" wet grinder also. I am pretty happy with it, but have a few issues with mine. The hole in the grinding wheel (I'm not sure what the technical term is) is not perfectly perpendicular to the flat side of the wheel, so there is a slight wobble, enough that you can feel and see it. I know that there are various methods for truing it up but I just haven't gotten to it. Also, the posts for the jig holder are not square to the grinding wheel, so the bar is not perpendicular. Anyway, I'm sure that I wouldn't have had these issues with a Tormek, but I also wasn't ready to spend $400.
 
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