Gonna start putting up walls. Need ideas!

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bsshog40

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So my metal shop is basically a glorified carport. The framing is done with 2 1/2" square tubing. So I already have 1"x2" boards behind 1" foam board insulation to give the insulation a gap between it and the outside metal. Of course the boards are really 3/4" in true measurement. I plan on using 19/32" OSB for the walls. My problem is going to be figuring out how to secure the osb in the corners. I plan on securing the osb to the frames, with each section joining at the middle of the 2 1/2" tube. There is only one tube in the corners. If I run my osb over the tube in the corner, I run into how I'm going to secure the osb for the other wall adjoining the corner. The one idea I had was just putting about 3 angle brackets onto the secured osb and secure the other osb panel with the brackets. I'm really open to better ideas if anyone has any. I've attached a pic of what the corners look like. I don't see the option of trying to frame in all the sections and having to extend all of my electrical outlets out. Help! Lol
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sbwertz

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I can't give you any advice for your corners, but if you plan to hang wall cabinets, I highly recommend French cleats. They allow you to re-arrange your storage at any time. All my shop cabinets and the wall of cabinets my husband built for my kitchen are hung on french cleats.

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jttheclockman

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If that outlet is in the corner that much I suggest you move it. You are not going to get plate on and anything you plug in there will be a pain to get to and if you want to use anything that has a housing it will not fit. For corners I would do a block of wood (2X4)and route slots or grooves in each side to slide the plywood into it. You could screw it in or glue it in and will stay.
 

bsshog40

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If that outlet is in the corner that much I suggest you move it. You are not going to get plate on and anything you plug in there will be a pain to get to and if you want to use anything that has a housing it will not fit. For corners I would do a block of wood (2X4)and route slots or grooves in each side to slide the plywood into it. You could screw it in or glue it in and will stay.
My problem is there is only about 1" of tubing left on each side of the corner John. No room for a block of wood. I will be running the plywood around the outlet and securing it to the 1" of tubing on the adjoining wall. I put outlets on all the structure tubes. No way of moving the outlet. Hopefully these pics make sense. The first one is colored red where my plywood will sit. The second pic just gives you an image of what is there before insulation.
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jttheclockman

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A couple things. You could have put a 2X4 from one stud to the other and used a couple angle brackets to hold it. Then hung outlets fron that anywhere on the wall. Could have done that throughout the shop. The outlets do not have to hang off a support. You could have put a standoff the top or bottom of the box to hit the outside wall to give the support needed. We do this all the time in the trades except they make standoffs for the walls we use.

As far as corner I went back to read what you said and you said you have plywood behind the insulated board. Why not just put strips in the corner to screw into that plywood and just cut the insulation. You could have done that every 16". I am guess you are hanging the outside OSB on the supports which are 3 feet or so apart. Thinking about it, if you have plywood under insulation board. You could have screwed outlet boxes anywhere you wanted. Unless I am not reading this right.

If I was putting in outlets I would have used 4" square boxes with raised rings. But remember I am an electrician and I think differently than you. I seen different things with materials available that you may not know.

That outlet is hurting you being that close to the corner. The board you show in red marries into the adjoning wall now your board on the adjoining wall has no support in the corner. So what you could do is use a piece of angle or I would just cut an L in a strip of wood. Now attach one side with screws into the red plywood and the other leg into the board on adjoining wall. But again that outlet hurts you unless you stop the strip before and after the outlet if that does not bother you. This is all to work with what you have.
 
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bsshog40

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A couple things. You could have put a 2X4 from one stud to the other and used a couple angle brackets to hold it. Then hung outlets fron that anywhere on the wall. Could have done that throughout the shop. The outlets do not have to hang off a support. You could have put a standoff the top or bottom of the box to hit the outside wall to give the support needed. We do this all the time in the trades except they make standoffs for the walls we use.

As far as corner I went back to read what you said and you said you have plywood behind the insulated board. Why not just put strips in the corner to screw into that plywood and just cut the insulation. You could have done that every 16". I am guess you are hanging the outside OSB on the supports which are 3 feet or so apart. Thinking about it, if you have plywood under insulation board. You could have screwed outlet boxes anywhere you wanted. Unless I am not reading this right.

If I was putting in outlets I would have used 4" square boxes with raised rings.
I don't have plywood behind the insulation. I have 1" x 2" strips to secure the foam board and to have a gap between the outside walls and foam board. Also, the tubing is 2 1/2". Even putting a 2x4 sideways would have left no room for foam board or the plywood overlay.
 

jttheclockman

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I don't have plywood behind the insulation. I have 1" x 2" strips to secure the foam board and to have a gap between the outside walls and foam board. Also, the tubing is 2 1/2". Even putting a 2x4 sideways would have left no room for foam board or the plywood overlay.
I disagree but my last suggestion is in the last reply and then I have no other ideas. If you have strip that are 1" behind the insulation you could have attached boxes to them easily. Not seeing the entire process I can not make any more suggestions. all I say never put an outlet in a corner like that. Build something off the support to support the box further out. here in NJ we use metal studs and and can cut and bend anyway we want. An L of either metal or wood is probably the answer to support that corner as I mentioned.

Make this in a 2X4 or some other hardwood.

https://www.homedepot.com/pep/FlexS...p.ds&msclkid=8ed20f53b4bb133118256aeb2e94c18b
 
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MRDucks2

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Run your OSB on the side walls like you plan on doing. When you mount the OSB on the end walls, butt it up tight to the side walls.

Take 2x2 and screw it into to face of both boards in the corners to attach them to each other. Yes, this leaves the 2x2 exposed on the inside of the corners but will secure the loose end to the solid end.
 

Woodchipper

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Interesting post. Why metal instead of wood studs? Seems that wood would be easier to work with and allow corners where OSB would butt up against each other for a tight fit. This is what I did when I closed in my basement/garage.
 

rherrell

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I have a 24' x 28' metral building for my shop, here are some pics of what I did.

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I also put 1"x 4"s on the ceiling and stapled the insulation. I use 3/8" plywood on the walls. I put sheet metal angle in the corners and screwed the ply to it, then I caulked the seam.

I put all my electrical on the outside, it just made more sense to me...

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sbwertz

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That is going to make a great shop! I also put a roll up insulated door on my shop so I could put lots of lights on the ceiling. My shop is a converted double carport, and I didn't want a standard garage door on it because it would prevent putting LED "fluorescent" lights throughout. It also means the door cannot be opened from the outside, only by releasing the sliding locks on the inside and with a steel door on the other end, it makes it more secure with all those tools in there. It has one small window that holds a window AC unit right in front of my lathes....it is Phoenix, after all LOL.
 
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bsshog40

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I disagree but my last suggestion is in the last reply and then I have no other ideas. If you have strip that are 1" behind the insulation you could have attached boxes to them easily. Not seeing the entire process I can not make any more suggestions. all I say never put an outlet in a corner like that. Build something off the support to support the box further out. here in NJ we use metal studs and and can cut and bend anyway we want. An L of either metal or wood is probably the answer to support that corner as I mentioned.

Make this in a 2X4 or some other hardwood.

https://www.homedepot.com/pep/FlexS...p.ds&msclkid=8ed20f53b4bb133118256aeb2e94c18b
Your suggestions are great John and I appreciate them. I was a little upset with the way they built this shop but I was already committed to it. I probably could have went in and framed around everything to make things easier but that would have cost a lot more money and a lot of drilling screws into these little support tubes. I'm just having to do the best I can by myself to make the shop feasible enough to work in hot/cold weather. Lol
 

bsshog40

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Run your OSB on the side walls like you plan on doing. When you mount the OSB on the end walls, butt it up tight to the side walls.

Take 2x2 and screw it into to face of both boards in the corners to attach them to each other. Yes, this leaves the 2x2 exposed on the inside of the corners but will secure the loose end to the solid end.
I actually like this idea better than the angle idea. And the more I think about it, I may cut the insulation back in the end wall corners and try to put a 2x2 in each corner to mount the osb to. Thanks!
 

bsshog40

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Interesting post. Why metal instead of wood studs? Seems that wood would be easier to work with and allow corners where OSB would butt up against each other for a tight fit. This is what I did when I closed in my basement/garage.
Yea, this is what you get when you buy a building from a carport company. I expected something different than what I got, but it is what it is. Lol
 

bsshog40

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I have a 24' x 28' metral building for my shop, here are some pics of what I did.

View attachment 367253View attachment 367254View attachment 367255View attachment 367256

I also put 1"x 4"s on the ceiling and stapled the insulation. I use 3/8" plywood on the walls. I put sheet metal angle in the corners and screwed the ply to it, then I caulked the seam.

I put all my electrical on the outside, it just made more sense to me...

View attachment 367257
Yea, in hind-sight, I should have just reframed the whole shop.
 

jttheclockman

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I actually like this idea better than the angle idea. And the more I think about it, I may cut the insulation back in the end wall corners and try to put a 2x2 in each corner to mount the osb to. Thanks!
Basically the same idea I am trying to tell you. Weather you make it an angle or a block makes no difference except for appearance and length of screws needed. The framing what Rick did is what I was talking about. see how he framed the windows, you could have run horizontal pieces from support to support throuout the entire walls. You could have hung your boxes for outlets off that if you wanted to bury behind the wall. I like the exposed piping idea but I told you this way back when you first started. But you need to be able to bend pipe. I can see he had some experience. Again though I would have used 4" square boxes. I hate those small boxes for doing splicing in and if you want to add outlets. With a 4 " box plenty of room and the mulberry covers can be double duplex or single duplex. As I said being an electrician I look at things differently. I piped my garage in a couple years ago. You have to work with what you have now and seems that corner is your problem and a block of wood or angle of wood ripped on a tablesaw so easy is the answer. just have to stop and start around that outlet. Hope you can get cover on when you butt opposite side wall in. good luck.
 

bsshog40

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Basically the same idea I am trying to tell you. Weather you make it an angle or a block makes no difference except for appearance and length of screws needed. The framing what Rick did is what I was talking about. see how he framed the windows, you could have run horizontal pieces from support to support throuout the entire walls. You could have hung your boxes for outlets off that if you wanted to bury behind the wall. I like the exposed piping idea but I told you this way back when you first started. But you need to be able to bend pipe. I can see he had some experience. Again though I would have used 4" square boxes. I hate those small boxes for doing splicing in and if you want to add outlets. With a 4 " box plenty of room and the mulberry covers can be double duplex or single duplex. As I said being an electrician I look at things differently. I piped my garage in a couple years ago. You have to work with what you have now and seems that corner is your problem and a block of wood or angle of wood ripped on a tablesaw so easy is the answer. just have to stop and start around that outlet. Hope you can get cover on when you butt opposite side wall in. good luck.
I hear ya John. My funds have also been limited on this thing. Lol I spent most my funds on my electrical. It was a little overkill but shouldn't have to upgrade anything in the future on that. I put 20a and 15a 2-outlet plugins on every support beam and one 20a in each corner. I also have an open spot to add 220v for the possibility of adding a mini-split system down the road. I think adding a 2x2 in the corners will be an easier option. On a side note, can you belive that a 2x2 is actually 1.25 x 1.25? Pitiful!! Lol
 

jttheclockman

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I hear ya John. My funds have also been limited on this thing. Lol I spent most my funds on my electrical. It was a little overkill but shouldn't have to upgrade anything in the future on that. I put 20a and 15a 2-outlet plugins on every support beam and one 20a in each corner. I also have an open spot to add 220v for the possibility of adding a mini-split system down the road. I think adding a 2x2 in the corners will be an easier option. On a side note, can you belive that a 2x2 is actually 1.25 x 1.25? Pitiful!! Lol
yep
 

MRDucks2

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I hear ya John. My funds have also been limited on this thing. Lol I spent most my funds on my electrical. It was a little overkill but shouldn't have to upgrade anything in the future on that. I put 20a and 15a 2-outlet plugins on every support beam and one 20a in each corner. I also have an open spot to add 220v for the possibility of adding a mini-split system down the road. I think adding a 2x2 in the corners will be an easier option. On a side note, can you belive that a 2x2 is actually 1.25 x 1.25? Pitiful!! Lol
Yeah, to get a 2x2 that is a full 1.5x1.5 you have to buy a 2x4 that is 1.5x3.5 and rip it to size. šŸ¤£
 

sbwertz

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Since I have an electrician in the family I chose to have a whole new breaker box with all 20 amp breakers put in for the shop. Like you, I had all the plugs installed at workbench level instead of floor level.
 
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bsshog40

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So after talking with my brother who use to build houses, I'm going in and taking out the foamboard and cross framing each wall panel. Luckily the foamboard can all be used to go right back in. Just have to cut it in sections. I used 2x3's for supports. I took 2x4 flush mounts, cut off about 1 1/2" off the ends and screwed them into the square tubing. I took out the 3 corner outlets as I didn't need them anyway. I will now at least be able to use full sheets of plywood and less waste. Lol I think it's gonna work out pretty good. A little time consuming, but will be worth it in the end.
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