First success with segmenting (all three pentel p200 mechanisms)

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Location
Alberta, Canada
Osange orange (accidentally took a bit too much off near the clicker, but that's hidden)
Olivewood, copper, mpingo (surprisingly comfy to hold)
Padauk, olivewood, and copper
3 pencils.jpg
 
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Osange orange (accidentally took a bit too much off near the clicker, but that's hidden)
Olivewood, copper, mpingo (surprisingly comfy to hold)
Padauk, olivewood, and copper

VERY NICE! Hmmm... I often make slim lines without the center band (Faux European). I may have just found a use for the center bands.
 
Nice going on the pentel conversion. I like the one on the right the best. I love seeing what others do with the conversion.

I've been making the pentel conversion since I read an article by Nick Cook. I think I made my first conversion in 2005. There were no special tooling so I improvised. I made my own "step drill" (very crude) and actually I went back to using two drill bits. At some point a member here started making step bits and special mandrels to hold the pen blank. OH!, so much easier. But, my friend, the late Rich Kleinhenz, published an article in Woodturning Design in 2012 that makes the process so much easier. Here is a link to Rich Kleinhenz's article. Shared with permission.
Do a good turn daily!
Don
 
Nice going on the pentel conversion. I like the one on the right the best. I love seeing what others do with the conversion.

I've been making the pentel conversion since I read an article by Nick Cook. I think I made my first conversion in 2005. There were no special tooling so I improvised. I made my own "step drill" (very crude) and actually I went back to using two drill bits. At some point a member here started making step bits and special mandrels to hold the pen blank. OH!, so much easier. But, my friend, the late Rich Kleinhenz, published an article in Woodturning Design in 2012 that makes the process so much easier. Here is a link to Rich Kleinhenz's article. Shared with permission.
Do a good turn daily!
Don
Aside from a couple staedtler mars 780s, all my pencils so far have been kitless pentel conversions. They're fun and pretty easy, but that dang adapter is the sticky spot (I've got some brass tube that presses into the previous tube after I drill it out, since my blank drilling is still pretty imprecise).
I'm glad you like them. The two on the right encourage different kinds of grips, and I think the middle one would work best as a sketch pencil since you naturally grip it up higher.
 
Aside from a couple staedtler mars 780s, all my pencils so far have been kitless pentel conversions. They're fun and pretty easy, but that dang adapter is the sticky spot (I've got some brass tube that presses into the previous tube after I drill it out, since my blank drilling is still pretty imprecise).
I'm glad you like them. The two on the right encourage different kinds of grips, and I think the middle one would work best as a sketch pencil since you naturally grip it up higher.
You may find this article helpful: https://www.penturners.org/resources/pentel™-pencil-conversion.428/

And read the article by Rich Kleinhenz. https://tinyurl.com/ycywescy
 
Very Nice. I have been thinking about trying something like that on the Pentel GraphGear 500 (0.9mm) lead pencils, but I haven't dove in yet. - Dave
 
I find the looks of the far right with two copper bands most appealing. Not so sure about the Osage orange one , it doesn't flow for me but great idea well executed đź‘Ť
 
Very nice trio. I suspect each feels nice in the hand; but, as a segmenter, the two with the copper bands look visually appealing. Well done.
 
Very nice trio. I suspect each feels nice in the hand; but, as a segmenter, the two with the copper bands look visually appealing. Well done.
Thank you, I really like the way the copper contrasts with the wood. An unexpected problem I ran into was keeping the dust separate while sanding/polishing them, which you can see a tiny bit on the olivewood
 
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