First Seam ripper

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mmayo

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
1,182
Location
Tehachapi, CA
Good start and make more

Very nice start to a new project.

I make and sell double ended seam rippers with one small ripper and a stiletto. Long ago I started having a rounded portion near each end, similar to a classic dog bone shape. Numerous occupational therapists and quilters commented on how ergonomic the design was, who knew. I now am convinced this is the most comfortable shape for most women, especially women with some years behind them. Though it may seem counterintuitive for women where slim is in, larger ripper bodies and more comfortable for many.

The photo is poor as I am under the weather for now.

Good work.
 

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Timber Ripper

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2017
Messages
280
Location
Burlington, NJ
Very nice start to a new project.

I make and sell double ended seam rippers with one small ripper and a stiletto. Long ago I started having a rounded portion near each end, similar to a classic dog bone shape. Numerous occupational therapists and quilters commented on how ergonomic the design was, who knew. I now am convinced this is the most comfortable shape for most women, especially women with some years behind them. Though it may seem counterintuitive for women where slim is in, larger ripper bodies and more comfortable for many.

The photo is poor as I am under the weather for now.

Good work.
Thanks for the advice. I will go for the more ergonomic shape on the next.

Feel better
 
Joined
Jan 28, 2019
Messages
32
Location
Alexandria VA

Shock me

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2010
Messages
158
Location
Boerne, TX
I’ve followed the theory of natural selection in settling on a profile, whatever sells the most gets reproduced more and a bit of minor random variation causes the profile to evolve. Apologies for the poor quality pic- the foreshortening obscures some of the shape, but the basic idea is still there. Concavity on both sides helps improve grip, and in general, older folk prefer the thicker ones, but not always-it’s good to have a range of thicknesses. The one on the far right is prolly too thin.

As far as tips-few seem to want a small seam ripper tip paired with a large-it’s redundant. A few more want the stiletto tip, but the most popular combo is either small or large ripper paired with a needle threader. For some reason, the tips are reversed in the photo-the needle threader usually goes on the narrower end for finer control. I always keep a supply of spare tips in case I’m wrong and the stiletto crowd is in town. Occasionally, people even want extra tips for even more versatility. The top request is for a cap for the ripper end which sadly I dont have

I should add that these are all longer than the tubes supplied in the kit, the extra length being necessary to get a good grip from both sides.


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Joined
Dec 22, 2017
Messages
790
Location
Wolf Creek Montana
Seam rippers are a hot seller for me. I use only a specific species of wood and I use, like Mark said, a dog bone type style. And I make thinner ones and thicker ones for just about any style or size hand someone might have. I sent 12 to a store about 2 weeks ago and after 10 days they ordered 12 more.
 

Timber Ripper

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2017
Messages
280
Location
Burlington, NJ
Seam rippers are a hot seller for me. I use only a specific species of wood and I use, like Mark said, a dog bone type style. And I make thinner ones and thicker ones for just about any style or size hand someone might have. I sent 12 to a store about 2 weeks ago and after 10 days they ordered 12 more.
Wow! that is hot seller.
If you don't mind me asking. How much do they typically sell for?
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2017
Messages
790
Location
Wolf Creek Montana
Seam rippers are a hot seller for me. I use only a specific species of wood and I use, like Mark said, a dog bone type style. And I make thinner ones and thicker ones for just about any style or size hand someone might have. I sent 12 to a store about 2 weeks ago and after 10 days they ordered 12 more.
Wow! that is hot seller.
If you don't mind me asking. How much do they typically sell for?
Not at all about asking. It takes me probably 1/2 an hour to turn, sand and get my first finish on. Let it sit overnight then hit it with Aussie Oil. So I probably have 3/4 of an hour into it. I can turn 12 in a day and also some key rings which I double stack on the mandrel. I sell them to a high end shop in Hawaii for $21.00, wholesale. He retails them for $43.00+. I also sell this same shop pens, key rings, coffee scoops and knives so I normally get an order that includes the items mentioned here. Almost forgot, he supplies the wood too.
 
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