First Kitless after a while

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Prinsen

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Jun 2, 2019
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13
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Netherlands
Hello everyone,

It's been a while since I've gotten to turn anything pen like, moving didn't give me much time to do anything lathe related.

Still seeing improvements over the last few, just need to work out how to get the threads a bit nicer and invest in a triple start.

This is a big pen for my bigger hands. 14mm threads. Sleeving the wood was also a challenge, in the end I didn't do it completely, but it worked out!

Would love to hear some feedback!
IMG_20200129_201225.jpg
 
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FGarbrecht

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Aug 22, 2019
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NY
Handsome pen, nicely done. What's the cap made from? What kind of wood is that? What is the section made from? I've been told to polish the barrel tenon before threading and then go after the threads with some plastic polish and a toothbrush.
 

Prinsen

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Jun 2, 2019
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Location
Netherlands
Handsome pen, nicely done. What's the cap made from? What kind of wood is that? What is the section made from? I've been told to polish the barrel tenon before threading and then go after the threads with some plastic polish and a toothbrush.
The cap is some random acrylic I had laying around. Darker with orange stripes, felt it would go well with the wood. I have no idea what wood it is. Got a pen blank from someone and just went with it. Section is Ebonite, love it but why does it stink and stain soo much...

Pre polishing sounds like a great idea, will be doing that next time. Thanks!
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2017
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Wolf Creek Montana
Nice looking pen from what I can see. Just a suggestion, when taking photo's of your pens put contrasting colors behind the entire pen. I can see the middle of the pen but the rest blends into the background, it's a wood on wood thing. Being colorblind is a big pain in the A#$#.
 

magpens

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Feb 2, 2011
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Coquitlam, BC, Canada
I think you have done a fine job, even without triple start !!

The wood might be Padauk.

When you say "sleeving" the wood, are you referring just to the drilling ? . Or do you actually insert a brass (or other material) tube ?
 

Prinsen

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Joined
Jun 2, 2019
Messages
13
Location
Netherlands
I think you have done a fine job, even without triple start !!

The wood might be Padauk.

When you say "sleeving" the wood, are you referring just to the drilling ? . Or do you actually insert a brass (or other material) tube ?
Padauk was also my first guess. Since I didn't know what wood it was and was a little concerned about the strength of the wood and needed something to thread, I did make a tube out of acryl to support the wood. I also used the same part to make the threads. Not sure how much it helped but I guess it's something.
 

Chief TomaToe

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Oct 6, 2017
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252
Location
Bloomington, Indiana
I am a fan of ebonite too, mainly because it is so easy to machine. Also, I agree about the terrible smell.

Ebonite is literally a hard rubber, so during machining I've noticed it releases a lot of fine dust which tends to get in any crevice it can find. Also, that's why you always get that burnt rubber smell - which is quite pungent.

The cap is some random acrylic I had laying around. Darker with orange stripes, felt it would go well with the wood. I have no idea what wood it is. Got a pen blank from someone and just went with it. Section is Ebonite, love it but why does it stink and stain soo much...

Pre polishing sounds like a great idea, will be doing that next time. Thanks!
 

Dr Robert

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Joined
Nov 11, 2015
Messages
31
Location
Kennett Square, PA 19348
I just entered the world of the kit less pen. When using ebonite as a coupler in conjunction with wood, can you turn the threads using a metal lathe? Is it advisable? More accurate? Recommendations?
 

darrin1200

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Mar 17, 2010
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1,019
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Lyn, Ontario, Canada
@Prinsen That is a beauty. My guess is also Padauk. Because of the deep ray flecks, and the tone. It also creates the orangest dust of anything. I hope we see something this good from you in the

@Dr Robert I use taps and dies to cut my threads, but that is mainly because I haven’t learned to thread in the metal lathe yet. I actually just got my thread dial fixed, so it’s next on the education list.
I use a little mineral oil when I’m cutting threads in ebonite.
 

FGarbrecht

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Aug 22, 2019
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470
Location
NY
I just entered the world of the kit less pen. When using ebonite as a coupler in conjunction with wood, can you turn the threads using a metal lathe? Is it advisable? More accurate? Recommendations?
As Darrin says, taps and dies work fine with ebonite. Single point threading on the metal lathe works for ebonite also. Personally I use tap and die method for ebonite because it is generally quicker than doing the lathe change gear setup.
 

magpens

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Feb 2, 2011
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Coquitlam, BC, Canada
YES !!

A die holder in the tailstock for cutting external threads. . The die holder free to rotate and slide longitudinally as threads are cut. . You can buy such die holders. . My hand is on the die holder to inhibit/control rotation, and also I can "feel" that everything is going OK.

A Jacobs chuck in the tailstock for cutting internal threads with a tap. . The Jacobs chuck mounted loosely so it can slide a little as the threads are cut. . . You can buy a Jacobs chuck which is mounted like a live center - my hand is on it to inhibit/control rotation - it still needs to slide a little.

When cutting threads of either type, I do not apply power to the lathe. . I turn the headstock chuck (which holds workpiece) with my left hand.
My right hand is on the die holder or the Jacobs chuck, as a guide to aid and control, and to "feel" that things are going OK.

This all takes a little practice to keep tap/die aligned and centered but you learn quickly and soon get the "feel" for the process. . I do not tighten the tailstock down, so that it can move a little along the lathe bed as the threading progresses.
 
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magpens

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Feb 2, 2011
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Coquitlam, BC, Canada
@Penultimate
Thanks, Mike, for pointing this out. . I have one, but misplaced it, so have been getting by without using it.
A very useful device for getting a tap started with accurate alignment, especially when making the first few turns of the thread cut.
It is spring loaded, which takes up slack as the tap advances into the workpiece during that critical phase.
The short blurb about this device on the LittleMachineShop website is worth reading for anyone who is interested in the process.
 
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