First crack at cutting boards

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jrich7970

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Socdad...They are 3/4 inch thick, and they are afraid to use them as intended. One is using it as decoration, and the other just as a "cheese board". As long as they like them, I'm OK. Only thing I don't like about the one is the Yellowheart ended up getting discolored from the walnut sanding dust. Because those strips are end grain I guess. I won't put those two together again. Or, if I do, I'll try to orient the strips the other way.
 

leehljp

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Socdad...They are 3/4 inch thick, and they are afraid to use them as intended. One is using it as decoration, and the other just as a "cheese board". As long as they like them, I'm OK. Only thing I don't like about the one is the Yellowheart ended up getting discolored from the walnut sanding dust. Because those strips are end grain I guess. I won't put those two together again. Or, if I do, I'll try to orient the strips the other way.
Do you have an cabinet scrapers or have you used them?
What I have found is that scrapers properly set and gently used will remove sanding dust. With a little practice, scrapers will pull the sanding dust off and leave the boards smooth. Practice beforehand so that you are not gouging. BTW, cabinet scrapers used to be very prevalent before sandpaper was common, and still is on upscale custom furniture.

The beauty of those boards could stand to have a scraper remove any sanding dust. Beautiful enough to be used as a decorative item, as already mentioned! . . . You do know that ART commands more value and money than functional boards, right? šŸ˜ƒ
 
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jrich7970

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Do you have an cabinet scrapers or have you used them?
What I have found is that scrapers properly set and gently used will remove sanding dust. With a little practice, scrapers will pull the sanding dust off and leave the boards smooth. Practice beforehand so that you are not gouging. BTW, cabinet scrapers used to be very prevalent before sandpaper was common, and still is on upscale custom furniture.

The beauty of those boards could stand to have a scraper remove any sanding dust. Beautiful enough to be used as a decorative item, as already mentioned! . . . You do know that ART commands more value and money than functional boards, right? šŸ˜ƒ
I have the rectangular shaped scraper in that pic. I haven't tried to use it yet, and actually, I got it *after* I made those boards. As for art commanding more money and value, sure, I can see that. But I haven't made that jump yet...one reason, of course, is because there are no shows around...and probably won't be any until next spring. That's OK.
 

jrich7970

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By the way...here are the boards from the edge. I put a bevel on them so they can be picked up easily. That was "interesting". I had to create a test piece the same size as the cutting boards so I could get the right distance from the fence so the angles would match up. Also, you can see on the bottom one there are some blade marks. Probably was because the fence wasn't totally parallel to the blade. I really need to make myself a sled. Best part...I have a lot of this wood left over and some of it is going to become blanks for pens. The maple, walnut, cherry, padauk and purpleheart. No yellow heart left over though.
 

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mmayo

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Make some cutting board conditioner. Mineral spirits and bees wax 14:1 by volume. Apply liberally monthly.
 

Curly

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.......I put a bevel on them so they can be picked up easily. That was "interesting". I had to create a test piece the same size as the cutting boards so I could get the right distance from the fence so the angles would match up. Also, you can see on the bottom one there are some blade marks. Probably was because the fence wasn't totally parallel to the blade. I really need to make myself a sled......
If you clamp a sacrificial board to the fence on the side the blade tilts into, tilt the blade and then raise it until the tips have just buried themselves into the board, you will be able to saw all your edges without changing the fence position. Want a bigger bevel? lower the blade, reposition the fence away and raise the blade again. Smaller? Do the opposite. The only thing to remember is to keep your gut out of the line of fire as the little triangle of wood off cut can come back at you.
 

jrich7970

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Make some cutting board conditioner. Mineral spirits and bees wax 14:1 by volume. Apply liberally monthly.
I used Walrus Oil Cutting Board Oil. Told my kids (and sisters, I made them some as well) to oil them with mineral oil "every once in a while". Turns out not one of them use them for cutting boards. One used it as a cheese board, the other three use them for decoration. I'm OK with that.
 

jrich7970

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If you clamp a sacrificial board to the fence on the side the blade tilts into, tilt the blade and then raise it until the tips have just buried themselves into the board, you will be able to saw all your edges without changing the fence position. Want a bigger bevel? lower the blade, reposition the fence away and raise the blade again. Smaller? Do the opposite. The only thing to remember is to keep your gut out of the line of fire as the little triangle of wood off cut can come back at you.
Thanks for the advice! I did make a sacrificial fence years ago which I use, but never for anything like you mentioned. I just use it when I need to cut something very thin.
 
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