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EricRN

Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
239
Just purchased a new blade for the table saw—Ridge Carbide 48 tooth combo blade. Was a little pricey but they say it can be resharpened 20-25 times; probably such that I’ll never need to buy another combo blade again. I’m hoping it will handle plywoods and crosscuts well. We will see. I’ll still probably need to invest in a dedicated rip blade for the thicker 2 and 3 inch blanks that I like to turn. But a 40 tooth combo would probably struggle with those too. Very excited for a nice blade. I’ve been working with the blade that came on my job site saw and it’s pretty clear that it was only designed for 2x4s and construction and not so much for fine woodworking and exotic hardwoods.
 

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
14,112
Location
NJ, USA.
This is a good blade. I believe I have one myself somewhere. It will do as you want. But I will give some insights that I have found over the years because I remember when all the top brand blade makers were touting their blades at woodworking shows and that is probably where I bought a few of them. Now this is just my opinion and is worth the money you paid to read it. First off these companies that sell their top brand blades at shows and demonstrate the thin cuts and smooth cuts and various angle cuts start with a finely tuned saw with no runout on the arbor. This is important when using any saw. So you can buy an expensive blade and not achieve the quality cut as what is being promoted. When using a full size tablesaw blade your saw needs to be able to handle heavy cuts with it so it needs the HP. That is why they sell thin kerf blades today because not everyone has those 3HP to 5HP cabinet saws. Some of those companies require you to ship them back to the company to resharpen because many blade sharpening companies do not have the sophisticated equipment to match the angles of the teeth on some of these blades. This can get expensive. Another thing I found from doing woodworking over the years, having a blade that is designed for your particular type of sawing means alot. Cross cutting, ripping, plywood, melamine, nonferrous materials and so on. Not that a combo blade will not do these things but better quality cuts come from type of teeth, amount of teeth, angle of teeth and pitch of teeth. You can not put all these things on one blade and that is why there are so many different blades. I know changing blades can be a pain and that is why the combo blade is popular. I am sure you will get alot of life from that blade and just work safely around all power tools. Take care.
 
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