Dyeing Wood

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wnybear

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Jan 24, 2013
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Ripley, NY
Has anyone here tried dyeing thin stock with standard household dyes before glue up? I have some scrap poplar laying about but it is pretty basic and has no interesting grain/color to it so I was thinking about using RIT dye.
 
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penmaker1967

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Jul 8, 2010
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biscoe nc
i have used rit dye before and it does very well for me not sure if if would hold up to turning myself i used the dye after i had turn the project then applied the dye and used ca or poly over it to keep it from fading. hope this helps
 

PTsideshow

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Dec 26, 2011
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Macomb County Michigan
Food coloring is water soluble, Having dyed 100,000's beads and wood chucks making parrot chew toys for cage birds when the item gets wet the color runs.
Rit dye is also a water soluble dye that is salt based. You can use it the hotter the water and the longer in the bath will deepen color of some colors. Again depending on the wood or material foam rubber you may have to rinse the excess color off to keep it form staining hands or other things.
Rit dye is also not listed as a food safe colorant if kiddies may put it in their mouth.
Check out WC or Rockler or Lee Valley for real wood coloring dye. well worth the expense and you can get the mixed coloring in bottle and just add fresh colorant as needed. Works great with alcohol, and some works with water.
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S-P-F and hard wood beads food coloring
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Rit dye tan color clown cowboy hat
On the food coloring follow the ole grama's using vinegar with the coloring and water for easter eggs it can make a difference, but the smell may linger.
:clown:
 

hornet406

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Jul 27, 2012
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126
Location
Nevada
I have a handful of pieces soaking in dye as I type this. I will let you know how they come out. I used powdered fabric dye mixed with water.
 

wnybear

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Joined
Jan 24, 2013
Messages
11
Location
Ripley, NY
So I made a few blanks today from scrap cherry and poplar. Later this week I will be turning and dyeing them. I think I'll try food color dye first just to see how well it works. Thanks for the input, here's a peek at the blanks.
 

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plantman

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Jan 2, 2012
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Green Bay, Wi
The secret is to turn first and dye later. Soakng the blanks in dye first will give you uneven penetration and no controll of final color unless put under pressure. Also uses less dye when done before finishing. Lightly sand any raised grain and wipe clean before adding CA or any other finish. Jim S
 

gbpens

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Jul 1, 2011
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747
Location
Homer Glen, IL
Many woods have a yellowing affect on dyes. Stick with white woods such as poplar, birch, box elder and maple. Those are the primary varieties on the market. Veneer packets are available on line. Cousineau Woods offers 1/16th birch veneer in a variety of colors. Great for segmenting. Soaking is inadequate for dying wood of any thickness. Dye after turning. Dyes tend to be translucent so repeated applications will not deepen the color. You have to strengthen the solution.
 

Jim Burr

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Feb 23, 2010
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Reno, Nv
RIT colorings, once exposed to UV of any kind will fade fast...2-3 weeks at most.This has been proven by HF art turners for years...that's why they don't use them. Transtint is one of the best, although there is another that is popular among the art crowd...the name isn't popping up in my head. Start with black, let it dry and sand it back to a highlight. Use your color of choice next. Repeat applications of quality dye will darken the color.
 
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