Drilling on the lathe

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FGarbrecht

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Aug 22, 2019
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NY
That looks scary. Had two lathe drill accidents recently, one bent a 7mm bit and sent it flying across my basement, the other my hand slipped off the chuck and the bit took a chunk out of my hand.
 

Curly

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Nov 20, 2010
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Saskatoon SK., Canada.
I have a question, why would one want to hold the chuck when drilling on the lathe?
Sometimes the taper holing the chuck into the tailstock will come loose from vibration and pull out. Maintaining some pressure against the tailstock keeps it from slipping.
 
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JimB

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Mar 18, 2008
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West Henrietta, NY, USA.
I have a question, why would one want to hold the chuck when drilling on the lathe?
Mostly because when you back it out, if the bit grabs, it can pull your entire chuck out of the tail stock. If you are holding the drill chuck you can prevent this from happening and you will also know instantly if it is starting to happen. If you are not holding it and this happens things can get very exciting very fast.
 

FGarbrecht

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Aug 22, 2019
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NY
Sometimes the taper holing the chuck into the tailstock will come loose from vibration and pull out. Maintaining some pressure against the tailstock keeps it from slipping.
Exactly. My chuck sometimes slips in the tailstock, especially when things get hot and the wood grabs the drill bit.
 

WriteON

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Aug 21, 2013
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Lake Worth,Fl. / BlueBell, Pa.
Holding the chuck. Show us where the manufacturer says HOLD the chuck while turning. Your hands guys. Your fingers. I lost the tail stock chuck a few times. Simply hit the off switch and backed off.
 
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John Eldeen

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Apr 3, 2019
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Sacramento, CA
Holding the chuck. Show us where the manufacturer says HOLD the chuck while turning. Your hands guys. Your fingers. I lost the tail stock chuck a few times. Simply hit the off switch and backed off.
I think there my be some misunderstanding here Frank. The chuck I reference here is the drill chuck in the tail stock not the headstock. Pete and Jim have covered it really well
Mostly because when you back it out, if the bit grabs, it can pull your entire chuck out of the tail stock. If you are holding the drill chuck you can prevent this from happening and you will also know instantly if it is starting to happen. If you are not holding it and this happens things can get very exciting very fast.
Sometimes the taper holing the chuck into the tailstock will come loose from vibration and pull out. Maintaining some pressure against the tailstock keeps it from slipping.
 

jeff

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Dec 5, 2003
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Westlake, OH, USA.
Who gets to sharpen that drill bit?
We send them out for sharpening. The machinist spent about an hour touching it up with a stone before the operation. Most big boring is done with dedicated boring tools with carbide inserts, but sometimes our guys like to be a little old school.
 

sbwertz

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May 11, 2010
Messages
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Location
Phoenix, AZ
It gets real exciting when the chuck backs out of the tailstock when you pull it out. This is not such an issue if you are cranking it out with the tailstock crank, but if you are drilling by hand pushing the bit into the wood and pulling it back out manually, if the chuck comes out of the tailstock you have a bent bit and a heavy chuck flying around in an orbit before it breaks the wood and goes flying around the shop. I don't hold it while I'm drilling but I always hold it when I pull it out of the wood.
 
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