drill bit storage

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monophoto

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2010
Messages
1,733
Location
Saratoga Springs, NY
I have a full set of imperial bits - fractional, lettered and numbered - that came in a metal bit file. I reserve those bits exclusively for use in wood. The fact that each bit has a dedicated place means that it's easy to find specific bits for an application.

I also have a random bunch of standard jobber-length twist bits that I have purchased over the years or inherited from my dad or FIL that I keep in two plastic boxes that originally came from the deli and contained sliced, baked ham. One box holds bits 1/4" and smaller, and the other holds larger bits. This setup is a bit more difficult to use, but it works for me. These are the bits that I reserve for use when drilling metal.

Then I have another of the plastic boxes that I use for specialty bits - brad point, 'aircraft' length, etc. I have fewer of them, so finding the bit that I need is not a problem.

And I have another plastic box (we're big on ham sandwiches in our house) that contains spade bits. Don't use them often, but sometimes they are convenient to have.

I bought a set of forstner bits at the big box store - 1/4" through 1 1/2" - that live in a wooden box. But I have a few additional odd-size forstners that reside in a rack on the wall. Likewise, I have a set of large diameter Silver and Deming bits (1/2" - 1" with reduced diameter shanks) that also came in a wooden box.
 

jjjaworski

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2012
Messages
706
Location
Las Cruces, NM
I used plastic tubes with caps on the ends I have acquired from buying turning tools and my wife's bead supplies.
I label the outside with drill size and kits it is used for.
I store them in a larger metal index card box I got at work that was being tossed.

I have all my other twist drill in metal cases for number, letter and fractional sizes. Plus two complete sets of all three. I used to work as a machinist years ago so something I used daily.

Other wood bits that came in sets usually have their own boxes.
I also have assorted sizes in my tool boxes- both machinist and wood pattern maker ones.

You can always make a drill block to hold the ones you use for pens to save time hunting them down when you need them.
 

egnald

Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2017
Messages
443
Location
Columbus, Nebraska, USA
Greetings from Nebraska - I have a plastic compartment box where I store my pen making drills, reamers, and extra mandrel shafts and stuff. I put each drill bit in one of the square plastic tubes from PSI and add a label to all 4 sides for easy identification. It works for me. - Dave
 

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eharri446

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2016
Messages
920
Location
Marietta, GA
I have several sets which came in there own cases. I also have a set which is all of the standard, letter, and metric bits for the pens kits that I make. I store those in a holder which was made by one of the members. I think it was by Hanau (username). He aslo made me a custom one for holding drill bits for the various taps and dies used in making kit less pens.

Also, for those who might be interested, I got an email this morning with this special in it: 155 piece drill bit set from Bits and Cutters.
 

howsitwork

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2016
Messages
972
Location
Thirsk
I used a filing cabinet with cardboard corrigations in the draws to stop em rattling. There are still 2 drawers full in it ! Then there’s the drill sets in dedicated boxes, then there’s the containers with bulk buys of certain sizes like David’s above . Sometimes I even right the sizes on the boxes.( not as often as I should I admit). Then there’s the ammo case with the taper shank drills set in wooden blocks. Then there’s the plastic tray of “ use these often so I’ll just keep them over there”.

OK with drills I’m a slob !😳
 
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