Coffee scoop advice

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Chasboy1

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Jan 11, 2019
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65
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Morristown, NJ
Hi folks, I bought a coffee scoop for my wife with a 1/4” shaft. I now have a Nova G3 4 jaw chuck and a spindle drive center as well as live tailstock center. What would be the best procedure to follow?
Drill the mounting hole first, turn the project using the chuck with the drilled end supported by the live center, then parting off?
Any advice appreciated!
 
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rholiday

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Nov 10, 2012
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Ft. Mill, South Carolina
Your suggested way of mounting, (chuck and live center with drilled hole), is the way I would go. There are other ways, but the way you mentioned is what I use for Back Scratchers that don't have a through hole.

Bob
 

monophoto

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Mar 13, 2010
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Saratoga Springs, NY
There are many ways to skin cats - - -

I think I would rough-turn the blank between centers, put a tenon on one end, and mount it in the scroll chuck. Turn the body, making sure that the diameter is correct at the point where the body of the turning meets the metal scoop.

Is the shaft threaded? If so, I would drill and tap the hole to match the threading, and then part off leaving the end of the handle as clean as possible. Then, mount a length of threaded rod in the scroll chuck, and screw the handled onto the rod to smooth over and sand the end.

If the shaft isn't threaded (which I presume means that it must be glued to the handle), I would drill a matching hole and part off the end of the handle. At this point, there are two options. You could mount a length of rod or dowel in the chuck, but since the shaft isn't threaded, it won't work well as a jam chuck (although you might be able to wrap a couple of layers of masking tape around the rod to pad out its diameter enough to jam the handle onto the rod. Alternatively, you could make a jam chuck with a slightly oversized tenon (dowel) extension to hold the handle while sanding the end.

Or you could mount a sanding mandrel in your chuck, and hand-hold the handle while sanding the end.

Like I said - many ways to skin cats.
 

Chasboy1

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Jan 11, 2019
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Location
Morristown, NJ
Thank you both. The shaft is not threaded and is 3/4” long. I was thinking I will drill the shaft hole about 1 1/4” deep, allowing extra for parting off.
However, couldn’t I use the mounting hole as the support on the live center on the tailstock, hold the other end in my chuck and then after all shaping and sanding is done, part off near the chuck? I can then reverse the project (after protecting the finished surface) and smooth the parted off end?
 

monophoto

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Mar 13, 2010
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Location
Saratoga Springs, NY
Thank you both. The shaft is not threaded and is 3/4” long. I was thinking I will drill the shaft hole about 1 1/4” deep, allowing extra for parting off.
However, couldn’t I use the mounting hole as the support on the live center on the tailstock, hold the other end in my chuck and then after all shaping and sanding is done, part off near the chuck? I can then reverse the project (after protecting the finished surface) and smooth the parted off end?

I don't see a problem using the mounting hole to receive the drive center for final finishing of the end of the handle. But you need to be careful if you use that mounting hole as the support while turning the handle - the fact that it is not threaded means that the blank will loosely jammed onto the drive center, and that could complicate the process of turning the handle. In addition, you could also damage the hole which will make installing the handle onto the scoop more difficult. Hence, my preferred approach would be to turn as much of the handle as possible with the mounting hole facing the tailstock, and then part off, reverse the blank, and finish the end of the handle.
 
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