Cherry tree bark - Sakurakawa nuri

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Teodor

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Feb 27, 2019
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Brno Czech Republic
Hello Everyone,

A different version of the cherry tree bark lacquer finish.
The pattern is made with sabi neri, mix of urushi and earth. I lost count of how much work was required but it was long, the layer of sabi neri took several weeks to cure.
Nice Day
PenTeo Samurai Flat Top Sakurakawa nuri 1.jpg

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PenTeo Samurai Flat Top Sakurakawa nuri 3.jpg

PenTeo Samurai Flat Top Sakurakawa nuri 4.jpg

PenTeo Samurai Flat Top Sakurakawa nuri 5.jpg

PenTeo Samurai Flat Top Sakurakawa nuri 6.jpg
 
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leehljp

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Teodore, that is a beautiful work of art! Rarely did I see that kind of detail in except in museums when I lived in Japan. Stunning!
 

magpens

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Feb 2, 2011
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Coquitlam, BC, Canada
Exquisitely interesting finish !!!!!

Very well done, Teodor !!!!!

Question ..... How do you know when the curing is "complete" when the process takes so long ?
 

Kcimdrib

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Nov 1, 2020
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I think I would be afraid to touch it. Again excellent work I think you should try CA finishing wearing a blindfold and one hand tied behind your back.
Great work.
 

TDahl

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Dec 11, 2019
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Brentwood
Simply incredible. One question I have (and you may have covered this when showing one of your previous works of art) is how you get the threads on the body for the cap so clean. What do you use to cut them. Thanks for sharing.
 

Pierre---

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Jun 10, 2012
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France
I must say I would not call it a cherry bark pen. 😊 But it doesn't matter, it's a great great pen anyway. Wow!
I wonder too about your perfect shiny threads. I guess you urushied them, but then? Rotary brush with compound? Disks? Sanding? Filing?
 

Teodor

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Feb 27, 2019
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Brno Czech Republic
Simply incredible. One question I have (and you may have covered this when showing one of your previous works of art) is how you get the threads on the body for the cap so clean. What do you use to cut them. Thanks for sharing.
Thanks. I made them by hand, triple start die from Tapco. I prepare the tenon like finish product, sanded smooth, I sand the edges. I use taping oil nd go slowly. After taping a sand again.
 

Teodor

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Feb 27, 2019
Messages
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Brno Czech Republic
I must say I would not call it a cherry bark pen. 😊 But it doesn't matter, it's a great great pen anyway. Wow!
I wonder too about your perfect shiny threads. I guess you urushied them, but then? Rotary brush with compound? Disks? Sanding? Filing?
Well it took me a lot of work and trials to make them. I can say only that I use japanese urushi for the threads, out of the box process to paint them and a lot of time, one note, dust free environement.
 

leehljp

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Feb 6, 2005
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Tunica, MS,
Yes. Truly A work of art superbly executed and genuine "Eye candy"
What is "URUSHI" ??? Is it a Japanese Shellac/Varnish Coating ???
TIA
ATB
aRM
Yes, urushi is a Japanese lacquer type of finish derived from a plant akin to poison ivy/oak. It takes a week to several weeks for it to cure properly, but once cured, it no longer will cause allergic reactions. In addition it is one of the hardest and highest temp resistant and longest lasting finishes around. But it takes many months and even a few years to master its use. Most of the urushi users here apply many many coats and allow each coat to cure before applying another. Different color coats are often applied at different levels for different effects.

There are 3 or 4, maybe 5 on this forum that are masters of this art form.

For almost 15 years, I lived in the area of Japan that became known for making the urushi finish the default finish in Japan, but didn't realize it until I returned back to the States. I wish I had taken an interest in the finish when I was there!
 
Last edited:

aRMdaMAN

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Jul 23, 2021
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Location
DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA
Yes, urushi is a Japanese lacquer type of finish derived from a plant akin to poison ivy/oak. It takes a week to several weeks for it to cure properly, but once cured, it no longer will cause allergic reactions. In addition it is one of the hardest and highest temp resistant and longest lasting finishes around. But it takes many months and even a few years to master its use. Most of the urushi users here apply many many coats and allow each coat to cure before applying another. Different color coats are often applied at different levels for different effects.

There are 3 or 4, maybe 5 on this forum that are masters of this art form.

For almost 15 years, I lived in the area of Japan that became known for making the urushi finish the default finish in Japan, but didn't realize it until I returned back to the States. I wish I had taken an interest in the finish when I was there!
Hello there HANK LEE Esq
I can only Thank my Lucky stars for having joined this "Elite" Group of absolutely unique, talented and ingenious Craftsmen whose workmanship we can only admire from a distance.
'Twas nice of You to take the time in explaining what URUSHI was and how it is worked.
And we can only say....."Awe, Shucks, Shame" to Your oversight whilst in Japan.
But then it's never too late to learn.
ATB & TC
aRM
 
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