Blue Light

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eharri446

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Mar 17, 2016
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1,017
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Marietta, GA
I recently started using Blue Light Blocking Reading Glasses 2 Pack Half Frame Readers from Amazon when working with my iPasd, iPhone, and PC. It does make a large difference with my eyes by relieving eye strain. Also, it makes it easier for me to fall asleep. I was having problems going to sleep since I like to read on my iPad before I go to sleep.

Of course, I need reading glasses due to my age. However, if you do not need readers, then you can get glasses which block blue light without the reader part.
 
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monophoto

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Joined
Mar 13, 2010
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2,348
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Saratoga Springs, NY
I use these also, both for ordinary computer use, and also for reading before I go to sleep at night.

After I had my second cataract surgery, I no longer needed glasses for distance vision so I chose to use ordinary drugstore readers (or readers I bought from an on-line source). But the problem was that most readers are of the half-lens variety, which means that when I'm working at my computer, I have to look upward to see through the readers, and that causes a lot of neck strain.

But the other problem was that I lost vision in one eye due to a detached retina. My optometrist advised me that it would be prudent for me to wear glasses full time so that I had some physical protection for my remaining 'good eye' - he was concerned about a freak accident that affected that eye and would effectively leave me totally blind. But those glasses are essentially reader bifocals with no correction in the upper portion - which brings me back to the neck strain problem when working at my computer.

So these two factors led me to shop around for readers that have full-size lenses that I can use when working at my computer, and that incidentally have the faint-yellow tint that blocks blue light. At all other times, I use my reader bifocals.

All of which falls under the heading of 'getting older ain't for sissies'.
 

monophoto

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Joined
Mar 13, 2010
Messages
2,348
Location
Saratoga Springs, NY
Update

I bought the three-pair for $10 from Amazon, and the pair that I use on a daily basis at my computer broke after about four months of use. No apparent cause - I was wearing them one day when I hear a loud snap and found that the rim around the lens had cracked on the right side. I tried gluing them back together with epoxy, but it didn't hold. And then a couple of days later the frame cracked on the left side.

The product reviews on the Amazon site reflect that others have also had problems with the frames cracking.
 

jrista

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Joined
Aug 12, 2021
Messages
1,261
Location
Colorado
I started using a program called f.lux many years ago. It works on windows and macs, I think. It automatically attenuates the amount of blue light emitted by various device screens in a natural way that simulates the natural color change of sunlight throughout the day:


There are similar apps for android and ios devices. Both windows and mac operating systems have some built in functionality like this now as well, although not with the natural scheduling of the color changes like f.lux does (for windows and mac, I recommend f.lux always.)

I particularly like f.lux because with its schedule, when I turn computers on in the morning or evening, it automatically dims them so I'm not blasted by all that bright blue-white light! Really helps my eyes and sleep.
 

monophoto

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Joined
Mar 13, 2010
Messages
2,348
Location
Saratoga Springs, NY
I started using a program called f.lux many years ago. It works on windows and macs, I think. It automatically attenuates the amount of blue light emitted by various device screens in a natural way that simulates the natural color change of sunlight throughout the day:


There are similar apps for android and ios devices. Both windows and mac operating systems have some built in functionality like this now as well, although not with the natural scheduling of the color changes like f.lux does (for windows and mac, I recommend f.lux always.)

I particularly like f.lux because with its schedule, when I turn computers on in the morning or evening, it automatically dims them so I'm not blasted by all that bright blue-white light! Really helps my eyes and sleep.
Actually, Windows 10 has an embedded feature that does this: Settings|System|Display You can set a schedule, and also choose the depth of color shift. Similar feature exists on iOS for my phone.

Unfortunately, there is no similar feature on my Kindle, but it's not as blue as other devices.
 

jrista

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Aug 12, 2021
Messages
1,261
Location
Colorado
Actually, Windows 10 has an embedded feature that does this: Settings|System|Display You can set a schedule, and also choose the depth of color shift. Similar feature exists on iOS for my phone.

Unfortunately, there is no similar feature on my Kindle, but it's not as blue as other devices.
Windows 10 has a very basic "night light" mode. It doesn't quite do what f.lux does, which tries to generate, daily, based on your location and the time of year, a truly natural curve to the color temperature (warmness (orangeness) vs. coolness (blueness)) of the light as the day and seasons wear on. The nice thing about f.lux is it is always adjusting to account for the natural change in real sunlight.

What Windows 10 has does some very basic adjustment based on DST alone, and then just shifts (rather rapidly) from "night light off" to "on" over about 30 seconds. The f.lux transitions are much slower and more natural. The f.lux stuff also takes into account science behind our actual circadian rhythms based on our wake-up time, and adjusts the "whiter" daytime color of the screen to mesh better with our natural circadian rhythm.

flux.png
 
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