Blank Measuring and Cutting Jig for Bandsaw Version 2.0

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egnald

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Jun 9, 2017
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850
Location
Columbus, Nebraska, USA
Greetings from Nebraska.

This morning I finished up a Tube Measuring, Blank Cutting Jig for my bandsaw version 2.0 by printing and applying some labels. My original design has served me very well and there really isn't anything wrong with it, however, I have been wanting to make a version that can be built using simple already dimensioned materials that can be found in my local home improvement store, except perhaps for the piece of T-Track which I ordered from Rockler.

Anyhow, it is essentially made of two pieces, a bandsaw sled base and a slider. The descriptions follow, but it is much more clear by simply looking at the attached photos.

The sled is made from an 18-inch length of 1x4 inch pine with a short piece of 3/4 by 1/4 inch piece of Oak Screen Molding that rides in the miter slot on the bandsaw. (I used Oak instead of pine simply because it is a harder wood and should wear better as it slides in the miter slot). On top is mounted an 8-1/2 inch length of T-Track which is extended to the full 18-inches with a piece of 3/4 square dowel. (I sanded the dowel down just a little to accommodate for the thickness of the label that was applied). There is also a 1/4-inch square dowel used as an outer guide rail for the slider and another bit of 3/4 square dowel as a stop for the tube gauge and one to keep the slider from accidently coming off.

The slider is made from a scrap piece of 1/2-inch plywood with a hole drilled through it to accommodate the T-bolt. The bottom is fitted with a length of 3/4-inch square dowel as part of the tube gauge and a couple of short pieces of 3/4-inch square dowel that pushes against the blank.

This is a top and bottom view of the sled and slider.
IMG_2012 Cropped.jpg
IMG_2013 Cropped.jpg

This shows where the tube and blank go on the fixture.
The tube length itself is what determines the length of the blank.

IMG_2014 Cropped.jpg

Here are the results from the cut from the picture above.
Note that the blank is consistently about 1/8-inch longer than the tube.

IMG_2015 Cropped.jpg

For Reference, this is a photo of my Version 1.0 jig.
It is conceptually the same and works the same, but it required special router bits to cut the integral T-Slot into the sled.

IMG_2017 Cropped.jpg

There is enough throw that I also use this to cut raw blanks to the desired 5 or 5-1/2 inch lengths.
It has been a very useful jig.

Regards,
Dave
 
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Dehn0045

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Mar 19, 2017
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Houston, Texas
Nice jig! I'd probably have to put a stop along the back edge or eventually I'd forget what I was doing and cut it in half, lol
 

Wmcullen

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Dec 1, 2020
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Fairfax, Virginia
Looks great! Identifying the less creative parts of our hobby and figuring out elegant or expeditious ways to accomplish them with jigs is another whole hobby in itself. Thanks for sharing!
 

egnald

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Joined
Jun 9, 2017
Messages
850
Location
Columbus, Nebraska, USA
Nice jig! I'd probably have to put a stop along the back edge or eventually I'd forget what I was doing and cut it in half, lol
Interesting that you should bring that up. Actually there is a reason that I cut the runner to a precise length. I have a WedgeLock device that came with a Kreg featherboard that I use as a miter stop on my saw for exactly the reason you stated -- at one time or another I almost did cut jig in half (my old jig). It simply jams itself tight in the slot when you tighten down the knob. I didn't need it for my featherboard as it is mounted to a T-Track on my router table. It is easy to remove when I need to cut stock that would interfere with it. - Dave

IMG_2020 Cropped.jpg
 
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