blank jig

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stevet876

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Mar 6, 2018
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augusta ga
I found a cool easy to make blank jig on you tube. It is used for cutting the corners off the blank to save wear and tear and time when turning down the blank. it works great and cost less than $4 for the aluminum angle. here is a link to the video I used to build the jig.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HV7V5ewo2GM
 

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MiteyF

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I've been wondering about an easy way to do this, without having to reset my band saw to 45* and then back to 0* every time. I've already got the angle, time to go scrounge and make some dust. Thanks!
 

JimB

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Maybe it's just me but I wouldn’t use that jig the way it is. I would not be comfortable having my fingers that close to the blade. But that is just me. There is also the possibility that the jig could move and run the blade into the angle iron (or your fingers).

You already have a tool that is made to knock corners off... your lathe. I watched the video and honestly I can knock off the corners much, much faster on my lathe then he did in the video. A sharp tool and turning up the lathe speed is all it takes.
 

MiteyF

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Maybe it's just me but I wouldn’t use that jig the way it is. I would not be comfortable having my fingers that close to the blade. But that is just me. There is also the possibility that the jig could move and run the blade into the angle iron (or your fingers).

You already have a tool that is made to knock corners off... your lathe. I watched the video and honestly I can knock off the corners much, much faster on my lathe then he did in the video. A sharp tool and turning up the lathe speed is all it takes.
A small clamp on the jig and a push stick. Viola.
 

gtriever

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I have to agree with Jim. When I first started turning pens, I built a lot of jigs including an edge jig from plans here in the Library. I used it exactly twice and then went back to turning the corners off on the lathe.
 

JimB

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Maybe it's just me but I wouldn’t use that jig the way it is. I would not be comfortable having my fingers that close to the blade. But that is just me. There is also the possibility that the jig could move and run the blade into the angle iron (or your fingers).

You already have a tool that is made to knock corners off... your lathe. I watched the video and honestly I can knock off the corners much, much faster on my lathe then he did in the video. A sharp tool and turning up the lathe speed is all it takes.
A small clamp on the jig and a push stick. Viola.
No jig, no clamp, no push stick. Just my lathe and it will be done faster than you can say 'Viola'... OK, maybe a little longer...5 seconds.
 

MiteyF

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Maybe it's just me but I wouldn’t use that jig the way it is. I would not be comfortable having my fingers that close to the blade. But that is just me. There is also the possibility that the jig could move and run the blade into the angle iron (or your fingers).

You already have a tool that is made to knock corners off... your lathe. I watched the video and honestly I can knock off the corners much, much faster on my lathe then he did in the video. A sharp tool and turning up the lathe speed is all it takes.
A small clamp on the jig and a push stick. Viola.
No jig, no clamp, no push stick. Just my lathe and it will be done faster than you can say 'Viola'... OK, maybe a little longer...5 seconds.
That's great for you. Maybe you've never turned, say, a segmented pen with grain running both directions, and a big chunk of cross grain black palm? Try turning that down to round in "5 seconds" and let me know how it goes.
 

JimB

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West Henrietta, NY, USA.
Maybe it's just me but I wouldn’t use that jig the way it is. I would not be comfortable having my fingers that close to the blade. But that is just me. There is also the possibility that the jig could move and run the blade into the angle iron (or your fingers).

You already have a tool that is made to knock corners off... your lathe. I watched the video and honestly I can knock off the corners much, much faster on my lathe then he did in the video. A sharp tool and turning up the lathe speed is all it takes.
A small clamp on the jig and a push stick. Viola.
No jig, no clamp, no push stick. Just my lathe and it will be done faster than you can say 'Viola'... OK, maybe a little longer...5 seconds.
That's great for you. Maybe you've never turned, say, a segmented pen with grain running both directions, and a big chunk of cross grain black palm? Try turning that down to round in "5 seconds" and let me know how it goes.
Sorry, That didn’t come across right. I didn’t mean to sound like a wise a$$. I apologize.

I’ve turned very little segmented. I have turned some black palm. I’ve also turned burl, mostly for bowls. I turn Pens, larger spindles and many bowls ranging from 3” to 15” blanks. I only use my bandsaw to knock corners off medium and large bowl blanks to get rid of large amounts of excess wood and get the bowl blanks better balanced. I’ve never used my bandsaw to knock corners off any spindle blank, large or small, regardless of the wood/material being turned.
 

jttheclockman

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As mentioned if you are not doing a segmented blank then no need to knock off corners. If you find a need to then use a belt sander. I knock corners off segmented blanks on my bandsaw and sometimes my belt/disc sander But make a simple sled and use double sided tape. That jig shown is an accident waiting to happen. You never put a blade in the center of a sled of any kind. The sled slides past the blade. I believe there is an example in the library. Good luck and save the fingers. :smile:
 

MiteyF

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As mentioned if you are not doing a segmented blank then no need to knock off corners. If you find a need to then use a belt sander. I knock corners off segmented blanks on my bandsaw and sometimes my belt/disc sander But make a simple sled and use double sided tape. That jig shown is an accident waiting to happen. You never put a blade in the center of a sled of any kind. The sled slides past the blade. I believe there is an example in the library. Good luck and save the fingers. :smile:
It doesn't look like it's a sled, it looks like a jig. As in, the blank slides through the angle iron.

And I know all about the dangers of band saws, I had surgery about 5 years ago to reconnect 4 tendons and 3 ligaments (plus 2 destroyed joint capsules) in my hand after a mishap with a horizontal band saw. I've got a picture, but this site doesn't seem to even like "grown up" words, so I doubt it would allow the pic.
 

leehljp

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That is angle aluminum. I cut aluminum with the band saw, TS and router all the time. Not a major problem. Been doing this for many years and learned this from someone who did this for years.

Yes, there are precautions one may need (gloves, goggles /face mask) but carbide teeth cut aluminum well. He is not cutting the aluminum but if he hits the aluminum, it is not a big deal. With his setup, a simple push stick will do the job without a problem.

I agree that there are delicate blanks that benefit from rounding the corners before turning. I like HSS and sharpening my own turning tools, others like carbide inserts. It's a personal choice. In this same manner, nothing wrong with cutting the corners off before turning. I do that occasionally with a router just for the fun of it.
 
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PatrickR

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Zionsville, IN
To each his own. What ever works for you. I don’t see any reason not to. I use a disc sander but remember seeing Norm Abrams do it to spindle blanks with a table saw.
The problem I see with the jig is that the blank is not fully supported when it reaches the blade, pulling it down into the opening. (Clearly seen as he cuts). A simple modification would fix that.
 

jttheclockman

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I stand behind my adult words. No need to see pictures of your mistakes and your hands. Hope you learned from the mistake Mityman. It not being a sled was my very point. You do not make a stainionary jig with a moving blade in the middle of it. You make a sled so you work piece slides past the blade. In this case you are sliding on a piece of aluminum that does not allow for slippery surface to begin with. The amount of material being taken off is just not worth the effort. This is all my opinion. Someone mentioned if the blade hit the aluminum. If that is strictly a wood blade than look to buy another because nonferrious materials will dull wood blades and we know it is not carbide. I would not be comfortable with it for sure but some may find it acceptable. Good luck.
 

Jolly Red

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Carterville, IL
I use a jug similar to your for cutting the corners off larger spindle blanks. However, I put the aluminum angle so it is oriented with the legs of the angle under the blank (90 degrees from your orientation). This supports the blank throughout the cut. To me, this is a safer setup.

I don't really see the need to cut the corners off small blanks, unless they might be the problem blanks that others have talked about.

Tom
 

Woodchipper

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Good idea. However, I find that it is as quick or quicker to turn the corners than to set up the BS and then have to set it up again to trim other blanks. After I glue up the tubes, some blanks will have a lot of extra wood. I carefully trim the blank to cut down on squaring the ends of the blank. Only do this with wood, BTW. This would be a good thing for larger pieces of wood for other things.
 
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I like the idea! Cut to length, place the jig on the saw and then cut the edge off I can see this being quicker than turning and with less chance of chipping the blank when getting started.

You can make a slide to ride on the right side of the plywood and into the aluminum "V" to push the blank along.
 
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