Beewax

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Stephanie

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BB3C4D95-E9F7-40D4-B95F-D76394BEC085.jpeg

Has anyone used this on their pens? I bought this awhile back and was wondering what the thought is on using it.BB3C4D95-E9F7-40D4-B95F-D76394BEC085.jpeg
 
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magpens

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I have never used that particular finish (but I have used similar) . . . I think you can not go wrong with it .

The label says "100% natural" .... it may not be really durable, but I would not worry about that .

The important thing at this stage of your "career" is to get your first pens looking nice, while learning the basics of turning.
You want to focus on getting pleasure from making the pens and admiring them.

I think that using this Beewax on your pens ( which I have seen in your other thread and which I greatly admire as first pens ) will help achieve that goal.
 
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Stephanie

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I used on the one pen I made with the chip on it. I used my friction polish first and about 5 layers of the Beewax on top. I’ll use the pen and see what happens. Experiment #1. Got nothing to lose.
 

penicillin

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Which friction polish are you using? Some of them have beeswax or carnauba wax in them already.

That "beeswax" product shouldn't hurt your pens, and a little gentle buffing with a soft cloth will give it a shine. If you apply it and polish it on the lathe, use very small pieces of cloth to avoid injury.

That beeswax product is not pure beeswax. I don't know what else is in it to make it a soft paste. Pure beeswax feels more like a wax candle at room temperature. I know woodturners who take a chunk of pure beeswax, apply it to their woodturning by holding the chunk against their turning, and then use a cloth to buff it out. Others do the same with carnauba wax. I have chunks of both. I use them other other things, but not pens.

The problem with beeswax is that pens get a lot of handling, and wax finishes are not durable. Carnauba wax is harder than beeswax, but still soft compared with a CA finish. Knowing that, most of the time I use a CA finish on pens.

Some pen blanks don't look good with a CA finish, so I use a shellac / wax combination on them. They look good, but I know that they won't be as durable. I use Hut Crystal Coat, but don't like it that much and want to try something else when it is gone. Shellawax or Mylands, perhaps.
 

scoobiehome

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Ready to get back into penturning soon! As a newbie, I used the Hut Crystal Coat and also tried the CA product. Just be careful with the CA fumes, as noted in previous threads. Ventilation and air/mask filters are important. Take care to stay healthy and post any questions on this therad. There's a wealth of knowledge in this group!

I think I remember a few conversations/threads about Linseed Oil as a finish? Maybe someone more knowledgeable than me could weigh in! Stay well and enjoy!
Renee
 

eharri446

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Watch Woodcraft for a sale on their Renaissance Wax - Clear Furniture Wax. This what a lot of museums use to wax their antique furniture with. It supposedly last longer than plain paste wax.
 

Stephanie

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Which friction polish are you using? Some of them have beeswax or carnauba wax in them already.

That "beeswax" product shouldn't hurt your pens, and a little gentle buffing with a soft cloth will give it a shine. If you apply it and polish it on the lathe, use very small pieces of cloth to avoid injury.

That beeswax product is not pure beeswax. I don't know what else is in it to make it a soft paste. Pure beeswax feels more like a wax candle at room temperature. I know woodturners who take a chunk of pure beeswax, apply it to their woodturning by holding the chunk against their turning, and then use a cloth to buff it out. Others do the same with carnauba wax. I have chunks of both. I use them other other things, but not pens.

The problem with beeswax is that pens get a lot of handling, and wax finishes are not durable. Carnauba wax is harder than beeswax, but still soft compared with a CA finish. Knowing that, most of the time I use a CA finish on pens.

Some pen blanks don't look good with a CA finish, so I use a shellac / wax combination on them. They look good, but I know that they won't be as durable. I use Hut Crystal Coat, but don't like it that much and want to try something else when it is gone. Shellawax or Mylands, perhaps.
Doctor's Woodshop, the High Build Friction Polish to go with the Pen's Plus that he makes.

I wasn't sure about the Beewax. I had it and thought it might be a way to put it to good use since I really have nothing else that I want to use it on.
 

penicillin

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Doctor's Woodshop, the High Build Friction Polish to go with the Pen's Plus that he makes.

I wasn't sure about the Beewax. I had it and thought it might be a way to put it to good use since I really have nothing else that I want to use it on.
I looked at Woodcraft's website, and then did some searches on the web. Both Doctor's Woodshop products already contain wax. Based on the description on the Doctor's Woodshop, I infer that it is carnauba wax, which is the most common wax used in those friction polishes. Like beeswax, it is food safe. Carnauba wax is harder and more durable than beeswax and it gives a good shine. It is the same wax that I put on my car.

Friction polishes all seem similar to me - alcohol, shellac, and wax. In the case of Doctor's Woodshop, they add some walnut oil, which will pop the grain of the wood. You apply the product, then quickly rub it with a cloth to get heat from friction. The alcohol flashes off (evaporates quickly), leaving a base of shellac and some wax to polish as the lathe turns. Doctor's Woodshop claims that their wax is extra fine, which keeps it in suspension better. Regardless, you should thoroughly shake any of those friction polishes to thoroughly mix and distribute the settled wax and other ingredients. Give the bottle a shake every time, just before you turn the bottle over to apply it.

The trick to applying those finishes is to get the friction heat up quickly after application. Otherwise, the alcohol will evaporate before the polishing cloth reaches the ideal temperature. You want hot, but not too hot. You are aiming for close to "burn fingers" temperature, almost "too hot to hold", but not quite that hot. I don't know how else to describe it. I hope you get the idea.

Remember to apply it with small cloths for safety. I take a 1-1/2 inch (4 cm) piece of old T-shirt fabric and pinch it between my fingers to form a V-shape well for a few drops of the polish, apply it back and forth quickly to the pen as the lathe spins slowly, then instantly spin up the lathe to high speed to get that friction heat while moving back and forth with the pinched hot fabric. If you don't have a variable speed lathe, then find a middle speed.

Remember to cover your lathe bed before applying any finish. If you use a flexible cover (fabric, plastic), then weigh it down to make sure it doesn't get sucked into the spinning lathe.

You will figure out what works best for you. :)
 

Stephanie

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I looked at Woodcraft's website, and then did some searches on the web. Both Doctor's Woodshop products already contain wax. Based on the description on the Doctor's Woodshop, I infer that it is carnauba wax, which is the most common wax used in those friction polishes. Like beeswax, it is food safe. Carnauba wax is harder and more durable than beeswax and it gives a good shine. It is the same wax that I put on my car.

Friction polishes all seem similar to me - alcohol, shellac, and wax. In the case of Doctor's Woodshop, they add some walnut oil, which will pop the grain of the wood. You apply the product, then quickly rub it with a cloth to get heat from friction. The alcohol flashes off (evaporates quickly), leaving a base of shellac and some wax to polish as the lathe turns. Doctor's Woodshop claims that their wax is extra fine, which keeps it in suspension better. Regardless, you should thoroughly shake any of those friction polishes to thoroughly mix and distribute the settled wax and other ingredients. Give the bottle a shake every time, just before you turn the bottle over to apply it.

The trick to applying those finishes is to get the friction heat up quickly after application. Otherwise, the alcohol will evaporate before the polishing cloth reaches the ideal temperature. You want hot, but not too hot. You are aiming for close to "burn fingers" temperature, almost "too hot to hold", but not quite that hot. I don't know how else to describe it. I hope you get the idea.

Remember to apply it with small cloths for safety. I take a 1-1/2 inch (4 cm) piece of old T-shirt fabric and pinch it between my fingers to form a V-shape well for a few drops of the polish, apply it back and forth quickly to the pen as the lathe spins slowly, then instantly spin up the lathe to high speed to get that friction heat while moving back and forth with the pinched hot fabric. If you don't have a variable speed lathe, then find a middle speed.

Remember to cover your lathe bed before applying any finish. If you use a flexible cover (fabric, plastic), then weigh it down to make sure it doesn't get sucked into the spinning lathe.

You will figure out what works best for you. :)
Thanks! I get what you are saying. Thankfully the Doctors Woodshop products come in a semi clear bottle which reminds you to mix it up. It seems to separate fairly quickly. He also has it as part of his label to shake up before using. I never thought to cover my lathe bed. I have some leftover drawer liner I can use. So much to learn. Appreciate all the info.
 

sorcerertd

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As for covering the lathe bed, I use a blue shop towel held in place with a magnet or two. I do usually keep the lathe bed waxed with some Johnson's paste wax, not just for protection, but the banjo and tailstock slide a little easier.

I've settled on CA as a finish for pens because of it's durability, but it can definitely be tricky and frustrating. I bought some Aussie Oil friction polish to use on magic wands and really like it for that and a couple other things I've tried it on. I'd imagine it's pretty similar to your Doctor's Woodshop stuff. If you are interested, here's a recipe in case you ever want to make your own: Shine Juice.

A little trivia... Shellac is made from secretions of the lac bug. It is mostly produced by females as a protective cocoon for their larvae. So it's a protective shell, made by a lac. There you have it. Yeah, I know. Pretty exciting. LOL.
 

Stephanie

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As for covering the lathe bed, I use a blue shop towel held in place with a magnet or two. I do usually keep the lathe bed waxed with some Johnson's paste wax, not just for protection, but the banjo and tailstock slide a little easier.

I've settled on CA as a finish for pens because of it's durability, but it can definitely be tricky and frustrating. I bought some Aussie Oil friction polish to use on magic wands and really like it for that and a couple other things I've tried it on. I'd imagine it's pretty similar to your Doctor's Woodshop stuff. If you are interested, here's a recipe in case you ever want to make your own: Shine Juice.

A little trivia... Shellac is made from secretions of the lac bug. It is mostly produced by females as a protective cocoon for their larvae. So it's a protective shell, made by a lac. There you have it. Yeah, I know. Pretty exciting. LOL.
That is kinda gross. How the heck does that work? Herds of Lac Bugs pooping everywhere and someone follows to scoop it up? I am going to have to look this up. Has to be interesting. Also...how the heck did someone figure this out? So bizarre. I did wax my lathe bed. Magnets for paper towels another great idea. I still haven’t figured out my dust collection. But getting there. Shine Juice?
 

LK&T

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That is kinda gross. How the heck does that work? Herds of Lac Bugs pooping everywhere and someone follows to scoop it up? I am going to have to look this up. Has to be interesting. Also...how the heck did someone figure this out? So bizarre. I did wax my lathe bed. Magnets for paper towels another great idea. I still haven’t figured out my dust collection. But getting there. Shine Juice?
There are some great videos online of the process, from collecting the "bug poop" all the way to final product. Shellac is a great wood finish that I use a lot. But like all finishes has its positives and negatives.
 

LK&T

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IMO beeswax paste is just about the prettiest finish you can use for wood. But, its durability is something to be considered. I use it on projects that aren't going to see a lot of handling like boxes, clocks and other "objects". I also use it on carved spoons because it's food safe and dead simple for my customers to reapply. On pens I want durable, which means hard drying finishes.
 

LK&T

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I used on the one pen I made with the chip on it. I used my friction polish first and about 5 layers of the Beewax on top. I’ll use the pen and see what happens. Experiment #1. Got nothing to lose.
Since beeswax doesn't harden, it doesn't develop layers. One coat that's rubbed in well will do ya'.
 

leehljp

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I used on the one pen I made with the chip on it. I used my friction polish first and about 5 layers of the Beewax on top. I’ll use the pen and see what happens. Experiment #1. Got nothing to lose.
I started to reply to this yesterday but got side tracked by travel.

Waxes - they are great protectorants for what they do. Unfortunately most people will not keep waxing. Waxing is not a long term finish as it dries out, evaporates and wears off rather quickly (days to a week or two). That is not bad in itself, but when one expects for it to continue to have that just waxed look, they get disappointed a few weeks down the road.

However, there are those who like the look and feel of wood, and wood that has just been waxed, and they take care of their pen and wax it weekly or every other week or so.

One of the first pens that I made and gave away had a very shiny wax finish and great "feel" to it. The owner came to me 3 days later asking me what happened to the finish. I learned quickly that I needed a more permanent finish and moved to use CA for the great majority of the pens that I made.
 

penicillin

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One thing that has not been said:
-> We are talking about wood and wood finishes here.

Plastic blanks (e.g., acrylic) don't need a finish per se. Polish them until they are nice and shiny and pretty and call them done. I use Micro-mesh for plastic blanks, sometimes followed by Hut Ultra Gloss plastic polish (sometimes not). Others have their own methods, but I have not heard of any pen makers who put wax, CA, or other finishes on plastics.

I also recommend wood pen blanks for beginners, because they are easier to turn. Plastic blanks are more challenging to turn on the lathe.

(For beginners - I recommend sanding the sharp edges of the plastic blanks to round them before turning. The brittle "corners" can cause the blank to chip or crack.)
 
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