Bandsaw Sled?

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bigthin13

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Sep 28, 2018
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Hi there! I just grabbed a table top bandsaw at a garage sale and got a great deal. I don't have the equipment in my shop to make a sled for it however, so I was hoping that somebody here might be up for the task. Of course I'd be willing to pay for your efforts! I'm looking for something just like the video below. Please let me know if you'd be able to help! Thanks a ton!

 
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mark james

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Hi Roman. OK, so I suspect that many folks can make this for you... (But why?)
If the table saw is functional, make it yourself. It would be a good exercise to get familiar with the bandsaw, see its capabilities and where you may need to tweak it.

Some very inexpensive scrap wood or a small plywood board from a Box store and you can explore making jigs. It may be a great way to make friends with your newest machine.
 

bigthin13

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Sep 28, 2018
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Oregon
Hi Roman. OK, so I suspect that many folks can make this for you... (But why?)
If the table saw is functional, make it yourself. It would be a good exercise to get familiar with the bandsaw, see its capabilities and where you may need to tweak it.

Some very inexpensive scrap wood or a small plywood board from a Box store and you can explore making jigs. It may be a great way to make friends with your newest machine.
I did toy with that idea, I’m just worried that a band saw won’t be able to square up the sled and give it the perfectly straight cuts it needs.
 

mark james

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I did toy with that idea, I’m just worried that a band saw won’t be able to square up the sled and give it the perfectly straight cuts it needs.
Play with it! I am not a good resource for bandsaws, and I hope/expect others will chime in. But I really believe you can do whatever you want with what you have. Just be patient for a few more suggestions. Band saw squaring up the sled? I think that is very feasible - don't spend any more money. :D
 

Curly

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Nov 20, 2010
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Saskatoon SK., Canada.
Before you do anything take a board and draw a straight line down the length of it. Cut as close to the line as you can for a foot and stop. Hold the board in that trajectory and turn off the saw. Does the kerf line up with the mitre slot? If not then you can’t use a sled to make crosscuts. There is a book by Mark Duginsky on tuning and using bandsaws. Get it. Worth reading.
 

jttheclockman

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Feb 22, 2005
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NJ, USA.
Before all the examples come out and the links on how to make, lets ask what is it are looking to do?? If it is just to cut blanks to length then no sled is needed just cut away. You are going to square the ends by some other means. If you are looking to segment than I suggest you get a tablesaw. If you want a sled for that then simple take a piece of plywood and put a runner under it to slide in the miter slot. They do sell miters for thos saws so you can buy one of those too. Lets face it man you are going to need alot more tools than just a bandsaw if doing pens.
 

bigthin13

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Oregon
I have all the tools necessary, I'm just looking to start segmenting, specifically herringbone blanks and a sled would make it a lot easier to cut the small slices needed.
 

jttheclockman

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I have all the tools necessary, I'm just looking to start segmenting, specifically herringbone blanks and a sled would make it a lot easier to cut the small slices needed.
Well I will say this with a bandsaw the blade can wander if not a good quality saw or blade and well tuned. You would be far more accurate on a tablesaw. This is just my opinion.
 

Mortalis

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Aug 19, 2013
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Rochester, Mass
Herringbone segmenting is easier using a table saw and fence. You slice the wood into 1/16" strips. Let the strips come off the non fence side using a 'thin strip guide'. The table saw and fence allow consistent thickness. Then use the band saw to cut the thin pieces into the laminate parts. A band saw, as Jttheclockman, mentioned is not the best tool for making the thickness slices.
 
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