Anxiously awaiting help

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Phixius

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Georgia, USA
I’m still wet behind the ears but have at least moved to using pull-ups... anyway my question. Proabably has many aspects so please expand as needed. My questions regards pricing a finished pen. The problem is the wood... 1) This would has been reclaimed from a SIGNIFICANT iconic place in history.. The structure was opened for use 1851 and yes was very much a place of use during the Civil War. So,e wood fro, this structure actually has lead bullet remains... (those have been place in a local museum) However there was some pieces I managed to acquire being somewhat of a local Civial War historian and do demonstrations (living histories and re-enactments). Larger pieces will be sold for those with more cash than me to uses to build a new used floor in a house or other structure. Anyway I have a few pieces to which I’m repurposed in the form of “Historical Pens”.... 2) The wood/tree is extinct being a Chestnut Hickory. Gorgeous Grain....

What on Earth do you price such rarity....

thanks in advance....

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FGarbrecht

Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2019
Messages
469
Location
NY
Since you have an interest in this particular bit of history, ask yourself what you personally would pay for something like this. See if you can find similar historical artifacts remade into modern craft items (Ebay, Etsy, etc), maybe that will help tell you what the market might be. Personally I'd figure out my costs to make the pen, add in the value of my time, multiply by some random number (profit margin) and add in the surcharges for historical value and rarity of the extinct wood. Worst that can happen is it won't sell.
 

mark james

IAP Collection, Curator
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
9,218
Location
Medina, Ohio
A great deal depends on the certificate of Authenticity (COA). I have several blanks that have a COA from a "Presidential Homestead, Jefferson" - Chestnut. I also have Chestnut blanks with no significance. They look exactly the same. Can I truly say the first are authentic... NO. Absolutely NO.

I have sat beside a blank seller that sold "historical" blanks and simply told his customers he was out of the "Authentic" COA's and would print them later that day and mail them out... OK... 🤔 (He was not the source for the blanks or the original COA's) .

So, judge the possibility you can accurately document the real source. Several years ago I bought and turned two pen blanks with "COA's from Presidential Wood Harvested from their properties." Market value...? In the appropriate venue, I'd say $500-$750/pen. The blanks were $50/each, kits $40.00. I had COA's; were they accurate - I have no idea. BTW - I did not sell either. One I gave one away in an IAP PITH for someone that I knew loved historical material. The other was a gift on an IAP function.

My point is, be careful! If you are the original source - GREAT - document your material as best as you can to retain it's possible value. If you are buying from another source, do your due diligence: A Presidential Chestnut Blank = $50.00+. A random Chestnut Blank = .75 cents!!!!!!!!!!!!! Appearance - the same.

I love authentic material; I hate scams. As a buyer - be careful. As a seller - do as much to verify your material as you can.
 

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
13,267
Location
NJ, USA.
I am sorry but what Mark says is true and to me that is just another $45 wood pen in my eyes. Even if you have a certificate, who is to say it is just not a copy of a copy. I stay far away from historical woods. At least I would not sell them. If you want to make for yourself then priceless. Just the way it is. Too many blank seller today and who knows what is what. That goes for the ones on here too. Just do not know.
 

Phixius

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Georgia, USA
First of all I’m making “blanks” myself the lumber it self is reclaimed from a Historical Rail Road depot... the gouged wood from iron wheels hoof prints from horses. It’s pretty amazing and iconic what’s even more a,axing as I was cutting and lathing the wood you can smell the coal from the locomotives and the grease and all... My family comes from along line of RR workers so the smell brings back so many memories.... Pretty wild how your nose Knows lol... I will goto the historical society locally to get COAs love more input.
 

alanemorrison

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2019
Messages
543
Location
N Ireland
My opinion only.
COA's maybe help to sell a pen as they are a unique selling point, but add little or no value to the pen.
Other folk may have different experiences.
Alan
 

gbpens

Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
739
Location
Homer Glen, IL
COA's are a good start but be sure to add pictures and a really interesting write-up. That will get the buyer's attention. Also, provide a box! Turn and finish the blanks but do not assemble all of them. Kits such as sierra are easy and quick to assemble. That way you do not type up your kits. Most customers will not put much of a premium on "historical"items. They tend to buy based on three things...appearance, appearance and appearance. So price the pieces slightly above your other work.
 
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