Another Small Box

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KenB259

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Dec 24, 2017
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Everyone's probably tired of seeing these, but I think only another woodworker can appreciate the prep work to make something like this. Not saying it's difficult , just takes a lot of engineering to cut the wedges perfectly and then setting up and cutting the threads and when you're done it all fits. I really enjoy making these. This one I let the lid overhang and I'm liking it better than the flush ones. All birdseye maple.
 

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d_bondi

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Utah
Beautiful!

I haven't done any turning other than pens and can't even imagine how you turn the threads.
 

KMCloonan

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Jun 13, 2017
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Round Lake, Illinois
Not tired of seeing them at all. They're beautiful. I agree with you that the lid being a little proud of the body diameter is a nice aesthetic. If you had just posted another box with the lid flush with the body, I would have admired it as well, but now that you've made the new lid design, It's cool to have this new option. Adds some variety.

The Birdseye Maple is also really a nice choice for these boxes.

I know you spent considerable time making the jigs to make these so precisely. From start to finish, how much time would you estimate it takes to complete one of these boxes? (hands-on time, not finish drying time).

Thanks for sharing.

KC
 

KenB259

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Not tired of seeing them at all. They're beautiful. I agree with you that the lid being a little proud of the body diameter is a nice aesthetic. If you had just posted another box with the lid flush with the body, I would have admired it as well, but now that you've made the new lid design, It's cool to have this new option. Adds some variety.

The Birdseye Maple is also really a nice choice for these boxes.

I know you spent considerable time making the jigs to make these so precisely. From start to finish, how much time would you estimate it takes to complete one of these boxes? (hands-on time, not finish drying time).

Thanks for sharing.

KC
I would guess it would take somewhere between 1-2 hours.
 

sorcerertd

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Sep 30, 2019
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North Carolina, USA
I'm not tired of seeing them, l and I do like the wider lid. The grain on the wedges/sides doesn't show as much, but it looks fantastic on that lid!
 

jrista

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Aug 12, 2021
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Colorado
I never get tired of seeing turned items. The wood here is really beautiful. Well done with the segmenting.
 

Lew

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Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas
Beautiful piece. But I am at a loss as to how you turn the threads. I don't believe you have a tap and die set of that diameter, so what's the process? Is there a tutorial somewhere?
 

monophoto

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Saratoga Springs, NY
Beautiful piece. But I am at a loss as to how you turn the threads. I don't believe you have a tap and die set of that diameter, so what's the process? Is there a tutorial somewhere?
Box threads are most often done using specialty tools called 'thread chasers'. These come as matched pairs - male and female - although there are a couple of makers who do a tool with a removable handle, and with the male and female threads at the opposite ends of the bar. A set of thread chasers has a fixed thread pitch, but can be used to thread items of any diameter.

Chasing threads is a skill that can only be acquired through practice, and generally requires timbers with close, straight grain. But a few people have mastered the skill of chasing threads in segmented boxes where the glue-up has been done such that the treads are always in side-grain.

Sam Angelo (the Wyoming Woodturner) and Mike Peace both have YouTube videos demonstrating thread chasing.
 

monophoto

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Not tired of seeing them at all. They're beautiful. I agree with you that the lid being a little proud of the body diameter is a nice aesthetic. If you had just posted another box with the lid flush with the body, I would have admired it as well, but now that you've made the new lid design, It's cool to have this new option
I've made quite a few small boxes - they are fun. My experience is that the slightly proud rim of the cap is problem more of a design feature - one of the problems with small boxes is that if the lid is snug (threaded or not), it can be difficult to remove because there is so little material to grip. Have a proud rim would solve that problem in addition to being aesthetically pleasing.
 

KenB259

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Beautiful piece. But I am at a loss as to how you turn the threads. I don't believe you have a tap and die set of that diameter, so what's the process? Is there a tutorial somewhere?
I use a Chefware Kits threading jig. For the most part thread chasing can only be used with very dense hard exotic wood and just a few domestics. Using the jig, I can use any wood and the threads are actually cut. Very fun to do n
 

Lew

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Location
Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas
Box threads are most often done using specialty tools called 'thread chasers'. These come as matched pairs - male and female - although there are a couple of makers who do a tool with a removable handle, and with the male and female threads at the opposite ends of the bar. A set of thread chasers has a fixed thread pitch, but can be used to thread items of any diameter.

Chasing threads is a skill that can only be acquired through practice, and generally requires timbers with close, straight grain. But a few people have mastered the skill of chasing threads in segmented boxes where the glue-up has been done such that the treads are always in side-grain.
Thanks for the response. I like your lids so much that I now have yet another rabbit hole to explore. I'm getting so many that even the rabbits are refusing to go down them.
 

d_bondi

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Utah
I use a Chefware Kits threading jig. For the most part thread chasing can only be used with very dense hard exotic wood and just a few domestics. Using the jig, I can use any wood and the threads are actually cut. Very fun to do n
Thanks so much, I just checked out ChefwareKits website and a YouTube video. This is really cool. Why do I have the feeling that it is going to cost me some money down the road... :eek::)
 

KenB259

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Thanks so much, I just checked out ChefwareKits website and a YouTube video. This is really cool. Why do I have the feeling that it is going to cost me some money down the road... :eek::)
There are other jigs that do the same thing but at about 2 or 3 times more. I love my Chefware Kits one, built very well and Craig the owner is very easy to deal with.
 

d_bondi

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There are other jigs that do the same thing but at about 2 or 3 times more. I love my Chefware Kits one, built very well and Craig the owner is very easy to deal with.

Ken, are you using the 10TPI or 16 TPI version? Thanks for the positive testimonial, I love supporting small businesses, and it looks to be veteran owned so it is a double word score!
 

KenB259

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Ken, are you using the 10TPI or 16 TPI version? Thanks for the positive testimonial, I love supporting small businesses, and it looks to be veteran owned so it is a double word score!
When I bought my jig a few years ago, I bought both spindles, but I have yet to use the 16 TPI one, all my boxes so far have been 10TPI.
 

hilltopper46

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Jun 28, 2006
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East Troy, Wisconsin, USA.
When I bought my jig a few years ago, I bought both spindles, but I have yet to use the 16 TPI one, all my boxes so far have been 10TPI.
This is funny, I have the opposite experience - I have both spindles and have only made on box with the 10tpi and literally 100s with the 16tpi. Just taste I suppose - perhaps I should try the 10tpi lead screw more often as it would result in fewer turns to remove the lids.
 
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