Casting Air Compressor Size for 2.5 gallon pressure pot.

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JBidinger

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I want to try my hand at making blanks with resin. I picked up a Harbor Freight pot that I'll convert to a pressure pot. My problem is that my air compressor lives out in the unheated garage and is too large to bring into the house. What would be the smallest compressor that would work for a 2.5gallon pressure pot? I figure a 3 gallon would be too small since it needs to "fill" 2.5 gallons. Maybe a 5 gallon?
 
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carlmorrell

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the capacity of a air compressor, think of it as reserve. When running air, for sandblasting, painting, power tools, you need the reserve capacity to keep the tool at the recommended pressure, when it is consuming air. I think that any compressor that has the PSI you need would work for a pot. As an aside debate I don't want to start, my best friend owns his own dental lab and casts under pressure for a living, he only uses 20-25 psi. Everyone on here will likely tell you that is not enough.
 

Fuzzy63

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Montpelier, Indiana
Hello Jon, I cast blanks between 45 to 50 PSI with a harbor freight pot that I converted also. I use a Dewalt DCC2560T1 and have never had a problem. The main thing is to make sure all your fittings doesn't leak air at all. Once you get to the psi you want and have no leaks the compressor shouldn't run. The pot should maintain that pressure. I'm sure everyone has a different way of doing this but this is just my way and it works for me.
 

howsitwork

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Why not link an old empty gas cylinder ( emptied and cleaned out first) into the systemwith a stop tap between the compressor and the linked tanks. Link the two up, charge to 50psi and then close the valve remove tanks with connect8mg line from the compressor, move into house and leave alone to cure.

I use this system as it gives a pressure reserve or vacuum reserve ( use it for both ) and means any leaks have minimal effect. Cheaper than a new compressor.
 

Lucky2

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Jon, rather then buying a new compressor, couldn't you build an insulated box around the compressor you now own? Then, all you would need to do, is to pipe the air into your house. To keep the compressor from freezing, is to use a 100 watt old style light bulb. That's what I did at my previous resident, and I never had an issue with it. Plus, it was a great benefit to have air available in the house, I used the pressurized air on a few different jobs. I used 1/2" heavy copper pipe, inside black vinyl water pipe.

Len
 

Kenny Durrant

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I have a 2 gal compressor and 2- 2 gallon pots. The compressor is rated for 125psi. I use 55 psi in each pot. I keep the hoses hooked up the whole time I have pressure on the pots. The only thing I have to do is open the valve slowly which I do to keep from blowing the resin all over the inside of the pot. Keep in mind there is more air in a 2 gallon tank with 100 psi than a 2 gallon tank with 55 psi.
 

JBidinger

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Jon, rather then buying a new compressor, couldn't you build an insulated box around the compressor you now own? Then, all you would need to do, is to pipe the air into your house. To keep the compressor from freezing, is to use a 100 watt old style light bulb. That's what I did at my previous resident, and I never had an issue with it. Plus, it was a great benefit to have air available in the house, I used the pressurized air on a few different jobs. I used 1/2" heavy copper pipe, inside black vinyl water pipe.

Len
Great idea but we have a detached garage and running an air hose that long would be an issue.
 

Charlie_W

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A wood turning friend uses a bicycle tire pump to pressurize her pressure pot. She doesn’t have room for a compressor.....works for her!

If you do buy a small compressor, go for the quieter ones that are popular today.
 

JBidinger

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A wood turning friend uses a bicycle tire pump to pressurize her pressure pot. She doesn’t have room for a compressor.....works for her!

If you do buy a small compressor, go for the quieter ones that are popular today.

I've got my eye on a 2 gallon that can go to 135 PSI and is advertising 60DB.
 

EricRN

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Probably more than you need but I just picked up a California Air Tools 4620ac and LOVE IT. Enough CFM for HPLV sprayers. Super quiet. Nice and compact.
 

Lucky2

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I would worry about condensation developing when running a line from a cold garage into a warm basement.
I use a small pancake style for this, works fine.


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All you would have to do to prevent condensation from being an issue, is to set it up with a drain for the condensation to be drained from. It's a small job to place one there, it works better then draining the compressor tank. Plus, you can install most any type of drain faucet.

Len
 

skipseke

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connellsville
Get s hotdog or pancake compressor st harber freight for around $40
They re small and loud (oilless). They should work they are slow but you can get 5p or 60 out of them
 

JBidinger

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FWIW I picked up a Makita MAC210Q Quiet Series, 1 HP, 2 Gallon. Since I'm doing this in the basement the "Quiet" part was mandatory. It's working great and most importantly received full SAF*.

* Spouse Approval Factor
 
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