A day of infamy

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BKelley

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Jan 31, 2010
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Tucker, Georgia, 30084
Today not much was said about one of the most horrible events ever endured by our Country. The bombing of Pearl Harbor. I guess most folks either don’t remember or it just isn’t important any more. I will always remember the men who gave their lives for my freedom. REMEMBER PEARL HARBOR !

Ben
 
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turncrazy43

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Apr 22, 2012
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Well said Ben. Too many young folks today don't realize how important that day was in our history. Thanks for bringing back to our attention.
Turncrazy43
See ya on the 15th.
 

Woodchipper

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Mar 15, 2017
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Cleveland, TN
I recall hearing family members telling of the attack broadcast over the radio. If we could just get the country united like it was on that day and the days to follow! My mother told of rationing of so many things. If there was a line to to get certain items, you got in line, no matter what it was, someone could use it. FYI, when a vote was taken to declare war on Japan, there was one dissenting vote. This was from a lady from one of the western states- can't remember who but I wonder how popular she was after the vote.
FWIW, I was told my uncle Joe was on a freighter loaded with scrap metal, bound for Japan. When the ship got word of the attack, they were routed to Singapore.
 

magpens

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Day of Infamy ... Indeed !! . I wasn't quite alive then but I will never forget the impact when I was old enough to understand. NEVER AGAIN I HOPE.
 

Cwalker935

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Richmond, Va
There was an old guy who worked in my old office building that was on one of the ships that was sunk, it may have been the Arizona but I am not sure. He was blown over the side when the bombs struck. He was picked up and placed on another ship. His family was notified that he was presumed dead. He must not have been much of a letter writer because he never contacted them through out the remainder of the war. After the war was over he showed up back home and gave his mother quite a shock. The initial confusion about his “death” is understandable but the lack of communication with his family is harder to understand given today’s multiple ways to communicate.
 

wolf creek knives

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Dec 22, 2017
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Wolf Creek Montana
My dad was on a sub during WWII and my father in law was on a destroyer escort. I have some of my dads photographs from Hawaii. I've asked my granddaughters about what they are taught about WWII and I'm surprised how little is brought up. My eldest granddaughter is almost 18 and her understanding of the Jewish Holocaust is almost nonexistent. There a saying something like, "If you don't understand the past, you're doomed to repeat it". Not sure who said it but it's very true.
 

super8mm

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Feb 26, 2016
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My father was on Corregidor when they had to surrender in May of 42. He spent some time in Cabanatuan POW camp then July 23, 1943 he was put on the Clyde Maru hell ship and sent to Fukuoka POW Camp #1 - Kashii (Pine Tree Camp) Kyushu Island to work in a mine.
 

sbwertz

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Phoenix, AZ
My dad was in the Army Air Corps the day of pearl harbor. Or maybe they had already changed the name to US Air Force by then. It was Army Air Corps when he enlisted in 1940.
 
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StanBrown

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Waller,Texas
FYI, when a vote was taken to declare war on Japan, there was one dissenting vote. This was from a lady from one of the western states- can't remember who but I wonder how popular she was after the vote.
Her name was Jeanette Rankin. She was from Montana, the first woman ever elected to Congress, and to this day is the only woman ever elected to the House of Representatives from Montana.

She was a dedicated, confirmed pacifist and was the only dissenting vote against WWII. In an odd twist of fate, she was also voted against WWI (she was first elected to Congress in 1916).

She died in 1973.

Whether you agree with her politics or not, she was an extremely interesting person.
 
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