4 questions with 1 stone

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Lexington, Ky
Hey fellas I'm at the point where I need to finish out some of my turning tools and figured I should stop by before making the investment. I've got a Jet 1221 VS and am looking for both a bowl coring system and Longworth chuck appropriate for my lathe. Far as the coring system goes I'm almost settled on the One Way 12" mini system. If there's a better system out there for a beginner like myself please mention it, but I'm fairly sure this should be the best option for ease of use. I see they offer replacement cutter heads. If the kit doesn't come with a carbide cutter should I go ahead and order that as well?

As for the Longworth chuck, I already have a Nova G3 chuck and wondering what's the least expensive but capable option I should look at for a Longworth that's compatible with my Nova G3? Also, not being that studied up on these kind of chucks, since my lathe swing is 12" I assume any Longworth described as 12" is appropriate for my Jet.

Last tool question...need advice on a good sanding system, drill, pads and disks. I get emails from the Woodturners Wonders and they're advertising two of their systems. One angle drill driven and the other friction driven. I'm guessing the drill is the better option? Only issue I have with that kit is Reed Gray talks about how the softer backed pads don't do well with the lower grits, so I guess I'll have to get more parts than this kit offers. Are the Woodturners Wonders kits worth looking into or are there better options out there?

Sanding kit link

And last, I have absolutely lucked out and found 10 good sized Walnut trees that a guy needs cut down, so if it turns out I can get this very labor intensive job done I'll have wood for a good long time to come. Brings me to the question, what's the best way / procedures / time of year to fell a tree with the idea of keeping it's bark on through storage / drying and the turning process? Believe I've seen winter is the best time to fell but is say November weather in Kentucky good enough or should I wait more toward late Dec or Jan?
 
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Better read up and check out the requirements for a coring system. I don't have one but from what I've seen, they probably require quite a bit of power. Also better check out whether or not a coring system can fit on a 1221.
I do have a Longworth style chuck and I use it often. I see it as a good method for finishing bottoms of bowls. There is a learning curve. Make sure you get one sized for your lathe (12" max for you). Also, make sure the "fasteners" are tight - but not too tight. The more "fasteners" the better IMHO.
I really like and use the sanding supplies from Woodturners Wonders. I also have the angle drill from there. The first one died and they were great in getting me another. WONDERFUL customer service. Just remember that these drills are meant to be DRILLS, not sanding machines. The continuous dust and the long sanding times makes for a pretty harsh environment.
I'll be there to help with the walnut ( :D). Wow, what a score! Best time to cut in order to keep bark on is deep winter. The bark is looser in the summer because the tree is growing (in girth as well as height). Anchor seal is a good coating on the cut ends to delay cracking (DELAY - not eliminate). I've also used old latex paint as a short term sealer.
Good luck!
 
Joined
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I use a Woodcut coring system... it's about the simplest I saw when I was shopping... draw back is the knives are more or less fixed as to what you will get, but I find it easier than some of the others.
I do use it on a Jet 1442 with a 1 hp or 1 1/2 hp motor... not sure right now.
Can't offer any advice on the Longworth... I no longer use one... mine was a home made and it let go of a bowl that careened off my face...
I prefer to use a simple vacuum chuck to clear the bottoms of my bowls....
on the sanding, not sure who Woodturners wonders is.... I buy all my sanding disc from Vince's WoodNwonders.... he has lots of pads that you can use for hand sanding as well as the appropriate discs... he also has the spindled pads that fit a sander... I bought my sander/drill from Amazon at about $39.... it is a Neiko 55 degree drill .... the ones I see at other sites are more in the $50+ range. Just be sure to blow the dust out of the vents regularly... my current drill is over 1 year old and still moving well.
I have one of the friction driven sanders from Capn Eddie... he offers the bushing, and magnetic ball for you to make your own... I use it occasionally, buy prefer the power sanding on my bowls.
No advice on the walnut, but lucky you if you can get it all.
 

ebill

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Nov 14, 2017
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magnolia tx
- I have a Ron Browns Best Longworth that I use occasionally. I too use a G3 chuck. https://tinyurl.com/34m8ks27 As with all Longworths, small bowls/objects or larger bowls/objects with curved surfaces become problematic for external grip with the small bumpers normally provided. For internal grip, the small bumpers are usually ok. Like Chuck I would prefer to use a vacuum chuck but its on my list of many things to buy when I win the lottery <g>.

- I have been eyeing the taller bumpers from Easy Wood: https://www.easywoodtools.com/product-page/2-easy-reach-grippers While I know that they are made for Easy Wood cole jaws, I bet some bolt sourcing/mods? would let me use them on a Longworth.

- re: your walnut problem <if there is such a thing?> .... I bet you can find some other woodworkers in your area that would cheerfully provide some labor in exchange for some turning pieces of walnut <I know I would>. Since they are going to come down anyhow, best time to cut is when you won't sweat to death sawing, loading, and hauling .....

- ebill
 
Joined
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Tellico Plains, Tennessee, USA.
- I have a Ron Browns Best Longworth that I use occasionally. I too use a G3 chuck. https://tinyurl.com/34m8ks27 As with all Longworths, small bowls/objects or larger bowls/objects with curved surfaces become problematic for external grip with the small bumpers normally provided. For internal grip, the small bumpers are usually ok. Like Chuck I would prefer to use a vacuum chuck but its on my list of many things to buy when I win the lottery <g>.

- - ebill
My vacuum chuck system is pretty simple... I have a long hollow rod, (looks like a lamp rod) that is fitted on a bearing that seats against my hand wheel on the Jet1442, has a nut with o-rings that fastens on the other end and a vacuum pump attached with a length of plastic hose.... no gauges or other paraphernalia.... I don't remember just which pump I have, but think it's two atmospheres in strength.... the tube and bearing I got on line for about $50 and the pump also on line for about $100. My Vacuum chucks I bought online also, but don't remember the cost... plus I have a second one that a friend gave me when he shut his shop down.
I set it up, use a live center in the tailstock to hold a chuck that centers the bowl on the vacuum chuck.... I listen to the pump to tell when it has reached a vacuum.
The whole system likely cost me under $250-$300.
 
Joined
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Lexington, Ky
Ted thanks for the coring advice. ONeWay does make a system that fits my 1221 but I'm hearing the 1HP motor that drives it probably isn't enough for coring. It was sort of a big assumption on my part but I'm glad I'm learning different before I invested the dough.

Thanks for the chuck etc advice too. Luckily I'm finding good wood around. The leads are sporadic, but when they come through it's like a jackpot! Any advice on treating bugs and how it's done. I was thinking sealing with Anchorseal was all that was needed but I've just recently been told how bugs will get in and separate the bark as well as create holes.

TellicoTurning, believe my 1221 has a 1HP so I bet your 1442 has a 1 1/2. And Holy Cow a bowl careening off your face! Yeah that's a hard lesson learned that doesn't have to be taught twice I bet! So now you say you use a simple vacuum chuck? Jim Sprague, a youtube woodturner I watch uses one so I looked into them and the cheapest I found was a grand, most of it being put toward the pump. But I'm all for making one out of parts and what nots like you're describing. Would you mind positing pictures of your setup? More pictures the better. $300 is entirely doable for something as nice as a vac chuck.

On your Neiko 55 degree angle drill, I'm looking at it's stats and comparing it with a Bauer $50 angle drill at HF. The Neiko turns at max 1400 where the Bauer does 1300. Neiko is 3.8 amp v. Bauer 3.5 amp. Neiko is 3.25 lbs while Bauer is 3.8...all in Neiko's favor. But the Neiko doesn't seem to have dialed speed control, just feathered at the trigger. Does this matter any or is sanding always done at maximum speed on the drill?

ebill thanks for the link for the Longworth at Ron Brown's, that's a decent price compared to what else I've seen.
 
Joined
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TellicoTurning, believe my 1221 has a 1HP so I bet your 1442 has a 1 1/2. And Holy Cow a bowl careening off your face! Yeah that's a hard lesson learned that doesn't have to be taught twice I bet! So now you say you use a simple vacuum chuck? Jim Sprague, a youtube woodturner I watch uses one so I looked into them and the cheapest I found was a grand, most of it being put toward the pump. But I'm all for making one out of parts and what nots like you're describing. Would you mind positing pictures of your setup? More pictures the better. $300 is entirely doable for something as nice as a vac chuck.

On your Neiko 55 degree angle drill, I'm looking at it's stats and comparing it with a Bauer $50 angle drill at HF. The Neiko turns at max 1400 where the Bauer does 1300. Neiko is 3.8 amp v. Bauer 3.5 amp. Neiko is 3.25 lbs while Bauer is 3.8...all in Neiko's favor. But the Neiko doesn't seem to have dialed speed control, just feathered at the trigger. Does this matter any or is sanding always done at maximum speed on the drill?
You may be right on the HP of the lathes.... I'll check tomorrow when I go out to the shop.
A bowl careening off the face is certainly a wake up.... mine came out of a home made long worth... Not sure I trust even a factory Longworth now... I'll use a Cole jaws on smaller bowls, but prefer the vacuum on larger one.
I'll also get pictures tomorrow for you... I'll have to do some research to determine what I actually paid, but know it was no where near a grand...

The Neiko has a paddle trigger for running the drill/speed control... I pretty much sand at full speed most of the time on the lathe with the work spinning at about 600 rpms....you can control the speed of the drill a little by the pressure you exert on the trigger, but I rarely try to run at slower speeds.... one think, a lot of the gears in the Neiko are plastic, so try to not let dust build up inside the housing... it has vents on either side front and back... I just blow the out frequently with my compressor. It also has a forward/reverse switch near the cord end of the housing... My switch as failed in the reverse direction, but still runs okay forward.... it also arcs occasionally through the rear vent... I get a zap about once a day... not serious, just a sharp nip, but does make me jump every time.
Don't know anything about the Bauer... next time I'm in HF will take a look at it... was just there today, but didn't look at any power tools.
 
Joined
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Bradley,
here are the pictures of my vacuum system...
DSCF5109.JPG
DSCF5110.JPG

The pump is a Zeny 3 cfm that I bought from Amazon.... currently listed for $76.99
DSCF5111.JPG
DSCF5112.JPG
DSCF5121.JPG
DSCF5113.JPG

These show the rod through the spindle, primarily a lamp rod attached to a bearing at the handwheel, where the air hose will attach.
second picture is the bearing flush to the hand wheel, third is an overall picture with the hose attached.... I already had the hose from another project.. you'll need one with an I.D. that will fit snugly over the nipple on the bearing... my hose is a 5/8 O.D.... didn't take it loose to measure I.D..... last picture is the nut that fits over the end of the rod and secures it in the spindle... the nut has an o-ring on it to make a good seal.
This is called a vacuum adapter kit and is by Hold Fast.... Price I found was $63.95
DSCF5114.JPG
DSCF5115.JPG
DSCF5116.JPG

This is the chuck itself, a 6" HoldFast...I also have a 3 1/2 inch....Not sure where I bought them, but if you look up Hold Fast Vacuum chucks, I'm sure you'll find several listing on the net.... Prices I found were $71.95 for the 6" and $59.95 for the 3 1/2".. there is also a spindle extension behind/between the chuck on the spindle... you might need that to move the rim of your bowls away from the headstock or headstock motor... my motor is to the size of the headstock and protrudes to the right a couple of inches.
DSCF5117.JPG
This is a chuck on a live center in the tail stock... used to center the bow on the vacuum chuck...
the m2 live center was $39.95 where I looked it up... the Barracuda chuck I already had and use it or one with #3 jaws depending on size of my tenon... a very necessary item to make use you have a good balance on the bowl.
DSCF5120.JPG
The pump and adapted hooked up.... I set the pump on the stool so I don't have to bend over to reach it on the floor (and not sure my hose will reach the floor.... you will need an air connection on one end of the hose to attach to the pump... also make sure you watch the oil level in the pump... there is a little window on the end towards the lathe that shows the oil level.

All told using current pricings, I think this system will run about $364.73 plus tax and shipping. Not sure if I paid these same prices, I've had most of this for over a year, maybe a couple of years.

Hope this helps... let know if I can add any info for you.
 
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