2 Pens 2Finishes 1Timber

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DrD

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Attached are some photos which highlight the differences one can get in end product using slightly different finishes and techniques. The pen on the left in the first photo is a BHW Streamline Flat Top 7mm in Chrome; on the right is a BHW Streamline Round Top 7mm in Chrome. Both pens are from the same 3/4" thick slab of Mecassar Ebony. The Flat Top (left pen in photo 1) was wet sanded 320 grit - 1000 grit, 3600MM - 12000MM; the sanding oil was Mahoney's Utility Finish. 24 hours later the pen received 3 coats of Pens Plus and 2 coats of Ren Wax. The Round Top was dry sanded thru the same grits as the Flat Top. Following the 12000MM a 2 coats of Myland's Sanding Sealer were applied. After the second coat dried the blanks were buffed with tan (micro fine) Mirlon, and 3 coats of Myland's Friction polish was applied, followed by 2 coats of Ren Wax. Photos 2 & 4 show 2 different views of the the tops of the 2 pens and photo 3 & 5 the bottoms. The is quite a bit of grain/structure/coloration in the Flat Top, but due to the darkening from the wet sanding, you need to hold the pen to really see it.

I just found this interesting as I continue my quest for a general alternative to CA.

DrD
 

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iamrohn

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Oct 8, 2019
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Minneapolis, MN
Thanks for sharing... coincidentally I just turned an ebony blank (with cocobolo accents) yesterday and have been googling to try to decide the better finish for it, your post is very helpful to me.
 
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DrD

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Joined
Jun 26, 2019
Messages
790
Location
Columbus, Mississippi
Thanks for sharing... coincidentally I just turned an ebony blank (with cocobolo accents) yesterday and have been googling to try to decide the better finish for it, your post is very helpful to me.
10 years + back when I was really active turning pens, I mostly turned wood and most of that was oily. At that time. William Woodwrite was in the USA, and he had the most marvelous friction sanding sealer and a wonderful friction polish. I don't believe he still sells those. They were the best!

I have about decided on Myland's Cellulose Sanding Sealer followed by PensPlus. There is a problem, for me at least, in that the Myland's dries extremely quickly - too quickly. But, with the wood I turn, I feel a sanding sealer is vital.

Thanks for taking the time to comment!

Don
 
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