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pshrynk

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Dec 6, 2017
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So i was going to spend the weekend learning how to do rings but discovered my tools are too big to turn the ID without shattering things. So I ordered a ring-specific tool.

Then I decided I was going to do the bracelet that I got to see if I wanted to do that. Turns out that I need a waste form to turn on because of scratching potential. So I ordered a new bangle form just to turn on.

Then I decided to turn the salt and pepper shakers that I got at Woodcraft last month. And learned about the thing called "Forstner Bit Extension."

Swear to ghod, if I find out that Slimlines now require some new gadget, I'm going to scream!
 
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dogcatcher

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Jul 4, 2007
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It will help a lot of you start with learning how to use all of the capabilities of your lathe before buying stuff you think you need. The mandrels the gadgets the whatever else things are nice. But in a lot of cases can be made using your lathe and or using junk in the shop to make your own gadgets.
 

JimB

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West Henrietta, NY, USA.
It all depends on what you want to make and how you go about it. Sometimes you can make your own tools or jigs to accomplish what you need to do. For example, I made some rings from Corian, no inserts (cores), just the Corian. To size the inside I made a mini tool from an Allen wrench.
 

sbwertz

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Phoenix, AZ
I don't know if this will work for rings, but I made a mandrel to turn napkin rings. Take a piece of hardwood and drill a hole about 3/4 the diameter of the inside of what you are turning, then turn a tenon a little smaller than the inside of the piece. Then take it to the band saw and saw into the end in the form of the cross. You can then mount it between centers putting the hole on the point of a large 60 degree live center. Slip the blank over the tenon and tighten the tail stock. As the tailstock tightens, live center will push into the split tenon and the mandrel will expand to firmly hold what you are turning. I use oak or hickory for the mandrel.

For me I drill a 1" hole in the mandrel, then turn a tenon to a little less than 1 1/2 inches. (My napkin rings have a 1 1/2" hole in the center) Then I slide the blank on the tenon and tighten the tailstock. The mandrel expands to firmly hold the napkin ring while I turn it.
I'd post a picture, but my mandrel is down at the blind center and I'm at home. Tip: use a pencil while the mandrel is spinning to scribe a vertical line to be sure you have your blank square on the mandrel.

Note: if you prefer you can hold the mandrel in a four jaw chuck instead of between centers.
 

JimB

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I have done what Sharon describes for Turning Corian rings. Works great! What I did for rings was turned a Morse taper on one end of the wood mandrel so it went directly into the headstock so I didn’t need a chuck or anything else to hold it.
 

dogcatcher

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One of the best investments you can make is drill and tap to make threaded accessories to fit your lathe headstock.

Here us a "ring mandrel" that threads on to my headstock. The square looking thing at the right end is a pipe plug. It's threads are tapered, so that as you screw it in, it spreads the 4 "fingers" of the collet like end of the "ring mandrel". The left end has been drilled and tapped to fit the 1-8 threads on my headstock. I suggest you use HDPE or other "plastic" to make this type of mandrel, the "fingers" are more consistent when moving out with the pipe plug.

You can make similar version that work as internal clamps, by using a hose clamp to bring the fingers to compress.
 

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pshrynk

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Dec 6, 2017
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Lake City, Minnesota
It will help a lot of you start with learning how to use all of the capabilities of your lathe before buying stuff you think you need. The mandrels the gadgets the whatever else things are nice. But in a lot of cases can be made using your lathe and or using junk in the shop to make your own gadgets.
Oh, I've made some of the stuff I need for rings, but the tools are still too small and I can't make a Forstner extension. It's all a part of the learning curve, I think.
 

sbwertz

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I actually have three forstner extensions because I use them a lot and don't want to have to keep changing the bit in the extension. Ace is only a few blocks from my house and they have them in stock.

I use a 1" for the peppermills we make and a 1 1/6" for the matching salt shakers (that is the diameter of the little plastic tubes I line them with), and a 1 1/2 inch for napkin rings. (I drill a hole through a long blank, then slice them on the table saw for napkin rings if I want them wider than 3/4 inch. Otherwise I cut them from three quarter or four quarter stock.)
 
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Texas Taco

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May 25, 2019
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Southeast Texas
I was only joking about the mandrel because I turn between centers. There is always more than one way to accomplish something.

RRRRRRRRRhhhh! Did I get it right? Am not very good with some of the regional American pronunciations. ;)
There's more than one way to skin a cat. :D
 
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