Stablization with Polyurethane

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mrplace

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I stabalized some spalted Maple burl blanks (3/4" x 5-1/2" not drilled) with high gloss polyurethane (Silver Can Minwax). I put it under vacuum and wait a few hours and let off the vacuum, and did this several time through the day. Then late that evening I put them under about 26" of vacuum and left it there until the next evening.

It has been two weeks and I grabbed one and put it on the lathe and notice that it is still a little damp inside. Has anyone else used Polyurethane, and how long did it take your blanks to dry?

Thanks,
 
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wdcav1952

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Mr.,

This is a link to the article on stabilization in the library. I have never tried the process, so the link is all I can offer.

http://content.penturners.org/articles/2004/polyurethane1.pdf
 

Tanner

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The same thing happened to me. Here is a discussion on using a toaster oven to help remedy the situation. http://www.penturners.org/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23417
 

mrplace

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My blanks seem to be more dense with the polyurethane than with the pexi/acetone method.

I just started a larger batch of blanks in the polyurethane last night. I guess I will just put them up in the atic where it is real warm (if the rain ever stops).
 

mrplace

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I pull a vacuum and let the bubbles stop, then let the vacuum off and let them sit for an hour or so, and then keep repeating until all the blanks sink and air bubbles stop forming under vacuum.

I really like the way the grain looks with the polyurethane. I have done about 20 spalted maple burls, and I am happy with all of them.
 

tomahawk54

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I've used plexi as a finish and was considering getting into stabilizing my blanks.
I would think that it would dry faster and polish better than polyurethane
 

guts

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I use minwax poly fast dry(silver can) and I am quite satisfied with the results,only downfall is the wait after,at least a month before I turn it,have not tried the toatser oven maybe the next batch.
 

Fred

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A question about drying... As I sat here reading this threat it dawned on me - not you Dawn - as to why we can't put slow drying items into a weighted down jar with the material raised off the bottom slightly and then put the jar into a pan of boiling water to heat the wood. DO NOT PUT A TOP ON THE JAR as I think it just might pop and throw boiling water everywhere. Then let the jar get hot, the wood get hot, remover after a bit of time, remove the wood from the jar, and let them cool down. I just may have to try this to see what my scientific results can be. This method would at least keep the wood from 'burning' as might happen in a toaster oven.

I think a tail jar like a Cremora jar would be great from keeping out any water that might splash in from the boiling water. Anyone else wonder along these lines? [?]
 

DocRon

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Originally posted by Fred_erick
<br />A question about drying... As I sat here reading this threat it dawned on me - not you Dawn - as to why we can't put slow drying items into a weighted down jar with the material raised off the bottom slightly and then put the jar into a pan of boiling water to heat the wood. DO NOT PUT A TOP ON THE JAR as I think it just might pop and throw boiling water everywhere. Then let the jar get hot, the wood get hot, remover after a bit of time, remove the wood from the jar, and let them cool down. I just may have to try this to see what my scientific results can be. This method would at least keep the wood from 'burning' as might happen in a toaster oven.

I think a tail jar like a Cremora jar would be great from keeping out any water that might splash in from the boiling water. Anyone else wonder along these lines? [?]
Two things occur to me. Be careful about bringing solvents such as acetone into the vicinity of heating sources, especially open flames, like a gas stove. Also, might be better to use a double boiler arrangement, rather than have your glass jar in direct contact with the heated bottom of the pan - it avoids thermal stress a little better. Other than that, I like the idea.
 

alamocdc

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Doc, anything stabilized with an acetone mixture would not be in this category as it is not slow drying. Blanks stabilized with it dry w/in a day or two. However, polys are would be included as slow drying and these too are flamable, so the warning concerning open flames and flamable vapors still applies.[;)]

Editted to correct typo.
 

MesquiteMan

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I have used a toaster oven for literally hundreds of blanks done in various different solutions with no problems at all. I have used it for Plexi-tone, poly, epoxy thinned with DNA, and Alumilite. The trick is to put it on the bake setting and abou 200 degrees. Then use put a nail in the door to hold it open 1/8" or so. The solvents will not build up inside since they can easily escape the open door and 200 is not hot enough to burn the wood. It works great and drastically speeds up the cure time. For poly it only takes 5 hours or so and plexi-tone take 1. This will get them completely dry through and through.

Of course all the typical warnings apply...don't leave the oven unatended, don't leave the oven near combustible materials, don't pick up the hot blanks with your bare hands, don't use your spouse's new toater over, etc.
 

tntwoodcrafts

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Quesnel, British Columbia, Canada.
Originally posted by mrplace
<br />I stabalized some spalted Maple burl blanks (3/4" x 5-1/2" not drilled) with high gloss polyurethane (Silver Can Minwax). I put it under vacuum and wait a few hours and let off the vacuum, and did this several time through the day. Then late that evening I put them under about 26" of vacuum and left it there until the next evening.

It has been two weeks and I grabbed one and put it on the lathe and notice that it is still a little damp inside. Has anyone else used Polyurethane, and how long did it take your blanks to dry?

Thanks,
I stabilize with poly mixed 50/50/ with mineral spirits (odourless paint thinner)My opinion, better penetration and quicker drying!!
 
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