Speechless & stumped.

Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad

WriteON

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2013
Messages
2,999
Location
Boynton Beach ,Fl. - BlueBell, Pa.
Our community had a group go to a glass blowing class. They posted pictures of themselves in the shop looking and doing. My first impression was oh boy. No safety equipment. Useless plastic cheap eye protectors. The business is owned/operated by artists. Where is the common sense and brains. The shop is as dangerous as a metal foundry. I bugs me to see anyone operating any machinery/tools, etc without proper protection. Is it macho mentality, laziness or what.
 
Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad

MRDucks2

Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2017
Messages
2,826
Location
Washington, IN
Interesting. While I have only been to a half dozen or so over the years, I have never been to a professional glass blowing location/studio in which they were not utilizing proper safety gear for the task.
 

EricRN

Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
584
Yikes. I had a similar experience taking my kids to the cub scouts pine wood derby workshop hosted by a neighboring den. After a 20 minute safety briefing, you go in and one of the volunteer dads working the band saw isn’t wearing any safety glasses at all. Others are forcing blocks of wood through band saws with blades that are clearly too dull to be safe, and not making any relief cuts. Then they’ve got the scouts using belt sanders and drills without providing any safety goggles. I took my kids home without doing any of that stuff. Would have offered to lead it myself next year if it were my parish and pack. I guess my only option is to buy a 14 inch Laguna band saw so we can do it in the garage next year!🙄
 

Fred Bruche

Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2018
Messages
853
Location
Philadelphia 19146
So what kind of safety equipment do you think they should be wearing in a glass blowing studio? Unlike metal, glass doesn't "splash" when worked with. I've done glass blowing for a few years, the worse injury I got was a couple of mild skin burns from the metal tools used to shape the glass. Seriously eyes protection is all that is needed at the level of glass handling occurring at an intro class. Don't you think such an event would have been banned a long time ago if any serious injuries were occurring on a regular basis?
 

Penchant 4

Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Messages
252
Location
Great Lakes Area
So what kind of safety equipment do you think they should be wearing in a glass blowing studio? Unlike metal, glass doesn't "splash" when worked with. I've done glass blowing for a few years, the worse injury I got was a couple of mild skin burns from the metal tools used to shape the glass. Seriously eyes protection is all that is needed at the level of glass handling occurring at an intro class. Don't you think such an event would have been banned a long time ago if any serious injuries were occurring on a regular basis?
Have assisted in glassblowing workshops for five years and am in complete agreement!
 

Penchant 4

Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Messages
252
Location
Great Lakes Area
Our community had a group go to a glass blowing class. They posted pictures of themselves in the shop looking and doing. My first impression was oh boy. No safety equipment. Useless plastic cheap eye protectors. The business is owned/operated by artists. Where is the common sense and brains. The shop is as dangerous as a metal foundry. I bugs me to see anyone operating any machinery/tools, etc without proper protection. Is it macho mentality, laziness or what.
It is awareness of the actual risks and standard practice. Glass, in its molten state, is about the consistency of honey. It does neither splashes nor splatters as do materials that are more fluid in the molten state. A good pair of Z87+ impact resistant glasses are sufficient to need in the case stated.

Glass that cools, without being annealed, is the typical risk to eyes in a hot shop. A typical hot shop will use metal containers such as a classic milk can for holding glass that will not go in an annealer. The shop I assist in has five such cans placed in convenient locations around the space. As part of the safety briefing given to students before they move into the glassblowing area, the need of and requirement for them to wear eye protection is among the emphasized points.
 

WriteON

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2013
Messages
2,999
Location
Boynton Beach ,Fl. - BlueBell, Pa.
So what kind of safety equipment do you think they should be wearing in a glass blowing studio? Unlike metal, glass doesn't "splash" when worked with. I've done glass blowing for a few years, the worse injury I got was a couple of mild skin burns from the metal tools used to shape the glass. Seriously eyes protection is all that is needed at the level of glass handling occurring at an intro class. Don't you think such an event would have been banned a long time ago if any serious injuries were occurring on a regular basis?
I'm anything but an expert however ......for me I'd wear protective gloves and anything recommended for full protection.

"Quote" "Don't you think such an event would have been banned a long time ago if any serious injuries were occurring on a regular basis?"

One accident is too many. Especially if it can be prevented. Too argue your comment NO...how many people get seriously injured or die in car accidents daily and they are not banned. Not apples to apples but just the same.
Safety concerns in Florida?...... great subject for a Comedy Club
Interesting. While I have only been to a half dozen or so over the years, I have never been to a professional glass blowing location/studio in which they were not utilizing proper safety gear for the task.

What equipment wear they wearing?
 
Last edited:

WriteON

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2013
Messages
2,999
Location
Boynton Beach ,Fl. - BlueBell, Pa.
Is an apron/gloves an overkill or a good safety measure or bunk.
I'm only stating my case. I do not like seeing people working or doing anything without proper protection. I have seen what can happen. I'm not preaching...just saying. Feel free to debate...I'm out. I'm not looking for support or disputes. Have fun and enjoy whatever you are doing. Be safe.
 
Last edited:

Fred Bruche

Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2018
Messages
853
Location
Philadelphia 19146
I am not arguing, but describing glassblowers as a bunch of careless hippy artists that don't care about safety is just plain wrong.
If you are interested to see how pros do it, check out the Corning Museum of Class channel on Youtube, they have recordings of live sessions.
 

WriteON

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2013
Messages
2,999
Location
Boynton Beach ,Fl. - BlueBell, Pa.
describing glassblowers as a bunch of careless hippy artists that don't care about safety is just plain wrong.
Fred...Never said that. I'm only referring to the particular group gathering from my community. I'm referring to a particular UNSAFE shop...in my opinion. I’d post pictures but obviously cannot post my neighbors pictures.

EDIT… The ladies attending were wearing watches, bracelets, rings, soft footwear. I’m calling foul on that. It’s the owners/instructors responsibility to protect everyone in the shop.
 
Last edited:

MRDucks2

Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2017
Messages
2,826
Location
Washington, IN
What equipment wear they wearing?
For those simply glass blowing in a shop or demonstration area (using mostly mounted flames and glass rod with their blowing) the equipment in use was shielded from those observing by a short transparent shield. Those working the glass were typically seated but wore a face shield or safety glasses (seen both in use). As I recall they had a leather pad in their lap they would set aside when they got up. Most of these, but not all, are aligned with commercial venues.

For those in larger scale custom glasswork shops they wore safety glasses and gloves or gauntlets when working close to the heat. Don’t know that I paid any attention to their footwear.
 

WriteON

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2013
Messages
2,999
Location
Boynton Beach ,Fl. - BlueBell, Pa.
For those simply glass blowing in a shop or demonstration area (using mostly mounted flames and glass rod with their blowing) the equipment in use was shielded from those observing by a short transparent shield. Those working the glass were typically seated but wore a face shield or safety glasses (seen both in use). As I recall they had a leather pad in their lap they would set aside when they got up. Most of these, but not all, are aligned with commercial venues.

For those in larger scale custom glasswork shops they wore safety glasses and gloves or gauntlets when working close to the heat. Don’t know that I paid any attention to their footwear.
Thanks MR. The S. Florida Crowd…There is nothing like group of NY women in a class or shop of any kind. Fashion first…Each and everytime.
 
Top Bottom