Backstop for gluing tube in blank

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TurtleTom

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I had all that HDPE left over from making mandrel cones so I decided to solve a problem I was having with glue ups. When I put the CA on the tube resting on my insertion tool and put it in the blank, wherever the tube stopped was where it stayed. I made a few short pens and gave them away.
So I put a 7mm short stub on a piece of HDPE which inserts in the back of the blank and prevents the tube from going out the other side or even up against the far side of the blank. You can see in the photo about how big it is. I put them together and hold it up against the lathe when I push the tube in.
It works really well. I made a slimline using the backstop and I had my first perfect glue up, even 2 of them.
I hope this helps someone else.
 

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TurtleTom

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Google HDPE it will pop up on Amazon 18 inch stick for $9.87 (I have free shipping from Amazon though.)
I'm sure I'll think up some new projects for the rest of that stick.
 

monophoto

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You can buy HDPE at a dollar store - it's the white material that kitchen cutting boards are made from.

My insertion tool is made from a bit of HDPE cutting board that I mounted between centers and turned into a conical dowel. I turned a tenon at the handle end to fit into a turned wooden handle. Ordinary glues won't adhere to HDPE, but you can turn some grooves in a tenon, and when you glue it into a handle, the glue will cure in those grooves to mechanically lock the handle in place.
 

chartle

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Google HDPE it will pop up on Amazon 18 inch stick for $9.87 (I have free shipping from Amazon though.)
I'm sure I'll think up some new projects for the rest of that stick.

UHMW is even cheaper at around $4 for I think 24". I bought some for my non stick bushings.

Added it to a recurring order we do so it was free shipping.
 

TurtleTom

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After more thought I realized UHMW or HDPE is unnecessary. Since probably no one puts glue within 1/4 inch of the end of the tube, the glue cannot reach the far end anyway since all the glue slides to the rear. So just make one from hardwood.
 
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After more thought I realized UHMW or HDPE is unnecessary. Since probably no one puts glue within 1/4 inch of the end of the tube, the glue cannot reach the far end anyway since all the glue slides to the rear. So just make one from hardwood.

Tom, I am not sure I understand what you mean. I could be gluing incorrectly. I recently had a blow out (rare!) so I maybe I need to re-examine my technique.

I drill the blank. I scratch the heck out of the tube with emery cloth. I mix up some epoxy. I then put the tube on the insertion tool. I roll the tube through the epoxy. I then slide the tube into the blank. I slide the tube almost fully out the other side of the blank. I then pull it back in and rotate it around a few times. I then place the tube to where I want it and let it set.

Thoughts?
 

pianomanpj

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After more thought I realized UHMW or HDPE is unnecessary. Since probably no one puts glue within 1/4 inch of the end of the tube, the glue cannot reach the far end anyway since all the glue slides to the rear. So just make one from hardwood.

I put glue on the entire length of the tube. Leaving any voids is just asking for a blow-out. Granted, most of that last 1/4" is covered with squeeze-out during tube insertion, but I'm not willing to take that chance.
 

TurtleTom

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I then pull it back in and rotate it around a few times. I then place the tube to where I want it and let it set.

Thoughts?[/QUOTE]

I can't think of a single improvement on that technique. The fact that you are using epoxy instead of CA I think puts you ahead of me. I mean to change my technique to include epoxy instead of CA in the near future. I might as well, I let the CA cure overnight anyway.
 
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I then pull it back in and rotate it around a few times. I then place the tube to where I want it and let it set.

Thoughts?

I can't think of a single improvement on that technique. The fact that you are using epoxy instead of CA I think puts you ahead of me. I mean to change my technique to include epoxy instead of CA in the near future. I might as well, I let the CA cure overnight anyway.[/QUOTE]

Thank you for the reassurance. However, I guess I don't understand what your initial post meant by not putting glue on the last 1/4". I figure most of us push the tube through a bit and then pull back. Therefore the last 1/4 always gets coated by glue. Right?
 

kaydubya

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Dunedin, New Zealand
After more thought I realized UHMW or HDPE is unnecessary. Since probably no one puts glue within 1/4 inch of the end of the tube, the glue cannot reach the far end anyway since all the glue slides to the rear. So just make one from hardwood.

Tom, I am not sure I understand what you mean. I could be gluing incorrectly. I recently had a blow out (rare!) so I maybe I need to re-examine my technique.

I drill the blank. I scratch the heck out of the tube with emery cloth. I mix up some epoxy. I then put the tube on the insertion tool. I roll the tube through the epoxy. I then slide the tube into the blank. I slide the tube almost fully out the other side of the blank. I then pull it back in and rotate it around a few times. I then place the tube to where I want it and let it set.

Thoughts?

I do the same and have never had a problem. The occasional blowout is due to unstable wood rather than gluing technique. Oh, and I always use polyurethane (Gorilla) glue, as it swells as it sets, thereby filling any voids. The only disadvantage is the need to glue tubes into blanks the day prior to turning but I don't have a problem with that.
 

Tom T

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I cover the whole tube with CA. It is a little more messy. I ware rubber gloves. I have found that if the whole tube is not covered that you can get play between the tube and the blank at the very end of some kits. It has never blown out, but the tip sometimes gets a slight edge as you slide your fingers up the tube. Because the blank has moved slightly after it has been turned and assemble. I should probably switch to apoxy.
I really like the tool you have made. Great idea thanks for sharing that with us.
 

Huskysibe

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Jan 23, 2015
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Burleson, TX
I use chopsticks to gently push a tube back that has been inserted too far. I first use the chopstick to dip the end of it in epoxy and coat the interior of the blank, then I just coat the tube and twist while pushing it in with my gloved finger and then kind of center it with the chopsticks to leave room on either end to square up the ends.
 
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