Acrylic chipout

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Hi,

Anyine ever have chipping like this on an acrylic? Have done a couple before with no issues. Is this a material problem or something I'm doing wrong?

Thanks,
Mike
 

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RobS

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Jun 20, 2016
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Hi Mike,

From the photos it looks like you are turning polyester and not acrylic.

Acrylic is very impact resistant, and can be turned easily.

Polyester, acrylester, or rhino are made from a material that shines up so well, but is fragile when turning.
I would recommend using a negative rake carbide bit, or negative rake scraper. That should allow you to clean that up.
 
Joined
May 1, 2020
Messages
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Location
Plymouth, MA
Hi Mike,

From the photos it looks like you are turning polyester and not acrylic.

Acrylic is very impact resistant, and can be turned easily.

Polyester, acrylester, or rhino are made from a material that shines up so well, but is fragile when turning.
I would recommend using a negative rake carbide bit, or negative rake scraper. That should allow you to clean that up.
Good eyes, checked the label on another blank. It is an inlace acrylester. I have an Easy Wood Tools carbide set, square, round, and detail. Was using the square to start. Maybe the round would work.
Thanks for the quick response
Mike
 

egnald

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Jun 9, 2017
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Columbus, Nebraska, USA
Yes! That looks exactly like Inlace Acrylester. In my experience it is one of the most brittle therefore difficult materials to turn. A sharp tool and light cuts - a round carbide might help as it exposes less cutter surface area to the blank and a negative rake if you have one. I've had the best luck cutting these at the highest speed my lathe will go. If you still get major chips you might try sanding it down to the final dimensions.

Inlace Acrylester is a polyester resin based material. I think Rhino is polyester also, but perhaps with different additives and/or percentages of hardeners that affect the brittleness.

I think the easiest to turn, but more expensive are they urethane based blanks, like Alumilite. I have been very impressed with the Diamond Cast blanks that Tim McKenzie makes.

Although Inlace Acrylester is a tough material to turn, it polishes great and makes great looking pens. I don't turn it very often anymore and opt for Rhino blanks instead as they are a little less brittle - still at the high end though.

And of course, the best of luck to you! - Dave
 
Joined
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Messages
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Yes! That looks exactly like Inlace Acrylester. In my experience it is one of the most brittle therefore difficult materials to turn. A sharp tool and light cuts - a round carbide might help as it exposes less cutter surface area to the blank and a negative rake if you have one. I've had the best luck cutting these at the highest speed my lathe will go. If you still get major chips you might try sanding it down to the final dimensions.

Inlace Acrylester is a polyester resin based material. I think Rhino is polyester also, but perhaps with different additives and/or percentages of hardeners that affect the brittleness.

I think the easiest to turn, but more expensive are they urethane based blanks, like Alumilite. I have been very impressed with the Diamond Cast blanks that Tim McKenzie makes.

Although Inlace Acrylester is a tough material to turn, it polishes great and makes great looking pens. I don't turn it very often anymore and opt for Rhino blanks instead as they are a little less brittle - still at the high end though.

And of course, the best of luck to you! - Dave
Thanks for the reply, I'll get a neg rake tip. My first time on Acrylester, thought I had acrylic.
 

sorcerertd

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If you turn your carbide tool upside down and cut at an angle above center it works just like a negative rake cutter
Hmm, the simplest things I don't thing of.

Everybody covered the bases on this, but I would just add that you cannot be aggressive with these blanks, no matter what cutter you use or how sharp it is. I typically use a 2" radiused carbide cutter, but don't turn many of these (not because of the brittleness, but because of the smell).
 

RDHals

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May 19, 2020
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North West Arkansas
I had that happen to me while turning a bowling ball once, things got ugly real fast that day. Thanks to a face shield and safety glasses I survived. The bowling ball not so much. I learned some things that day and the days following.
The negative raked carbide tipped tools are a must when working with that stuff. Follow that with a freshly sharpened skew and a very light touch. And move slowly, very slowly.
 
Joined
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Plymouth, MA
Hmm, the simplest things I don't thing of.

Everybody covered the bases on this, but I would just add that you cannot be aggressive with these blanks, no matter what cutter you use or how sharp it is. I typically use a 2" radiused carbide cutter, but don't turn many of these (not because of the brittleness, but because of the smell).
Ya, think this will be my first.....and last.🙄
 

David350

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Sep 10, 2017
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Location
Dallas, TX
One sure sign that the turning is not going well is that you see what appears to be dust coming off your blank and not ribbons of material. Based on the picture of your blank, I bet you saw some of that....
 
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