Do it yourself threading

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karlkuehn

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Sorry to have not stayed up with you guys that are forging ground here...I thought I was safe with doing 'kit' pens, but after reading Chris Thompson's stuff and seeing what you guys have been doing, I've got a bit of a bee in my bonnet to start really customizing my stuff.

With all the tap and die stuff that's been posted, what options are out there for duplicating/mating to existing thread patterns and preserving multiple entry points? I guess the multiple points aren't that big a deal, but it just intrigues me.

Someone please point me in the right direction to catch up here. I've got a bazillion ideas I'd like to try, but I'm not gonna start chasing threads by hand! heh
 
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ashaw

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Karl
You really have only two options. The first one is to get a set of tap and dies. This is only good for one pen style you want to make. By pen style meaning Small, Medium or Large. This is only for me a short term method. Because of there expense and because taps and dies do wear out over time. When you start by buy more then one set the price starts to approach the cost of a decent metal lathe. Note this applies to multi-start threads not single start. I wanted to try and make my own pen style before putting money out for a metal lathe. I really what to see what type of market there is. Chasing threads with a wood lathe is not all that bad. For dies you need a die holder about 20.00 and you turn the lathe by hand. What is really to challenge is getting the size down on a repeatable basis. That is turn for a metal lathe as well as a wood lathe. Right now once Atlanta is done I will be able to concentrate on make my own pens.

Hope that helps

Alan
 

Sfolivier

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Does anybody have a good small metal lathe to recommend? I think that for advanced pen making, it's looking more and more useful (not only for threading, but also for holder making and even full pen body work).
 

ashaw

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I know of a couple but I will have to look thru my information again. They start in the 2,500.00 range. But in the mean while I have been great some great result with my wood lathe and mini chucks. Next week I will have to post some information about my results.

Alan
 

rherrell

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I bought the 7x14 Micro-Mark metal lathe for $650.00, far cry from $2,500.00. I admit I'm new to metal lathes but it came highly recommended, as far as mini lathes go.
 

pipeyeti

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Originally posted by karlkuehn

Sorry to have not stayed up with you guys that are forging ground here...I thought I was safe with doing 'kit' pens, but after reading Chris Thompson's stuff and seeing what you guys have been doing, I've got a bit of a bee in my bonnet to start really customizing my stuff.

With all the tap and die stuff that's been posted, what options are out there for duplicating/mating to existing thread patterns and preserving multiple entry points? I guess the multiple points aren't that big a deal, but it just intrigues me.

Someone please point me in the right direction to catch up here. I've got a bazillion ideas I'd like to try, but I'm not gonna start chasing threads by hand! heh
Karl I almost never loan out tools but if you would like , when we get the taps in I will share. I will want to play with them for a few weeks. But after the initial newness wears off I'll still be doing kit pens so I would be willing to send them to you to play with for a few weeks. That should hold you until another group buy. I think we could work out a time share. it will give you a chance to see if you really want to invest the money in a set.
 

ashaw

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Rick
You are right Micro-Mark is a good lathe and for the price is a great value. I also would have been looking down that route had this been just a hobby. But since turning this into a full time business I had to look what was going to give me the best productivity for the money. Also had to look at longevity of the machine. After questioning a number of machinist that is where the price break came from. As a result would I change my mind later on an go to a Micro-Mark it all depends on what I want to do with it.
 

rherrell

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I agree Alan, if I were buying a lathe to use full time in a production environment I would go larger also. After reading ALOT about these little lathes it became obvious that there was alot of tweaking and tuning that needed to be done before you make your first cut. After spending all day last Saturday tuning it up I was able to do some practicing on Sunday. I made a set of JG bushings out of aluminum and they turned out pretty good! I'm waiting for some O1 drill rod so I can make the real McCoy's. There's ALOT to learn but I'm looking forward to it.:D
 

bgray

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I really recommend going bigger then a 7x mini lathe.

The problem is that you need to make screw mandrels, pin chucks, etc, from hard metals. The mini lathe will handle it, but it squeals and complains. And it's just not super-accurate.

The next problem is that mini-lathes really will not cut threads below 12tpi. If you are doing quad lead threads at 32 tpi, you need to cut 4 threads at 8tpi.

Someone has a strategy for setting up the mini lathe for 6-8 tip, and then you turn the leadscrew manually with a wrench.

So it can be done. You certainly CAN make any pen on a 7x mini lathe, but you might regret putting the money into it you are serious.

I own a Micromark, and I upgraded to a 12 x 36 within 6 months of using it.

There's a WORLD of difference.
 

Chuck Key

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Originally posted by bgray43050


Someone has a strategy for setting up the mini lathe for 6-8 tip, and then you turn the leadscrew manually with a wrench.
That is the way I do it on a Homier 7 x 12 that can be purchased for $299.00. Course if anyone thinks they need a $3000.00 lathe I have no problem with that.

Chuckie
 

rherrell

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Originally posted by Texatdurango

Originally posted by rherrell

I... After spending all day last Saturday tuning it up I was able to do some practicing on Sunday....
So which of the little monsters did you get?
I got the Micro-Mark 7x14. My first metal lathe so small was the way to go. There's ALOT you can do on a mini lathe and I believe it's the way, for someone like me, who's never run one before.
Making pens on this thing is the furthest thing from my mind right now. Gadgets and gizmos are going to be the order of the day for awhile. First thing is making all new between center bushings, good practice project. That should keep me busy for a couple weekends. It's a new toy and I've got to play with it.;):)
 

Texatdurango

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Originally posted by rherrell

...I got the Micro-Mark 7x14. My first metal lathe so small was the way to go. There's ALOT you can do on a mini lathe and I believe it's the way, for someone like me, who's never run one before.
Making pens on this thing is the furthest thing from my mind right now. Gadgets and gizmos are going to be the order of the day for awhile. First thing is making all new between center bushings, good practice project. That should keep me busy for a couple weekends. It's a new toy and I've got to play with it.;):)
I can't believe I totally missed your post above where you already said what you got, it's the stupid computer!

Just cutting your own c2c (center to center) bushings is gonna pay for the lathe in a short time, post some shots of them when you're done and possibly a "Robbins tutorial" :D
 

bitshird

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I would suggest a Jet 9x20 which is a belt drive and a bit picky for threading or a grizzly 11 x 26 gear head drive,which easier for threading,speed changes and bearing life, grizzly also makes a 9 x 19 that is identical to my jet 9x20 and about 400.00 less expensive, My jet gets Stainless and Titanium run through it quite often .
Harbor Freight, Grizzly and the Jet are only separated by color, and the Jet and Grizzly come with a 4 jaw and a 3 jaw chuck
 

randyrls

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Originally posted by Texatdurango

Originally posted by rherrell

I... After spending all day last Saturday tuning it up I was able to do some practicing on Sunday....
So which of the little monsters did you get?
My uncle has a Clausing in his shop. He does metal working. That chuck on that thing must be at least twelve inches across.
 

Texatdurango

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Originally posted by bitshird

I would suggest a Jet 9x20 .....
Why? Is it more capable than other brands of producing 3 or 4 start multi-start threads in sizes we can use in pens?

Could you elaborate on the threads it is capable of cutting and is it "user friendly"? I have heard that some lathes will cut certain threads but is very hard.

Thanks
 

bitshird

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Originally posted by Texatdurango

Originally posted by bitshird

I would suggest a Jet 9x20 .....
Why? Is it more capable than other brands of producing 3 or 4 start multi-start threads in sizes we can use in pens?

Could you elaborate on the threads it is capable of cutting and is it "user friendly"? I have heard that some lathes will cut certain threads but is very hard.

Thanks
No it's no easier to start multi lead threads on than any other lathe, in fact there is no easy way to set up a machine for multi start threads with out an index head, but the Jet is a good machine at a good price..
 
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