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Old 08-27-2016, 02:47 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Tool sharpening

I'm in the North Dallas/Lake Highlands area and need to sharpen my roughing gouge. Is there anyone that could help me?
I'm at 214-716-9005.
Thank you! I'm a week in to this fun hobby and am excited to be a part of this forum...
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Old 08-27-2016, 03:17 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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I'm sure someone in your area will help you out but if you are using HSS tools you need a way to sharpen them. Woodcraft has their slow speed grinder on sale for September. There are also other options.
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Old 08-27-2016, 03:44 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
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I'm in Benbrook, you are welcome to use my slow speed grinder.
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Old 08-27-2016, 06:36 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Not necessarily a recommended approach, but I simply free-hand sharpen my tools on a belt sander & touch up with small diamond homes.
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Old 08-27-2016, 08:09 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Not necessarily a recommended approach, but I simply free-hand sharpen my tools on a belt sander & touch up with small diamond homes.
I finally smartened up and moved my belt grinder right beside the lathe--makes touch-ups quick. Easy to put a quick edge on the gouge (I use the slack part of the belt) but I've not quite perfected getting the edge I want on the skew.

Regards,
Michael
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Old 08-28-2016, 07:55 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mecompco View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Not necessarily a recommended approach, but I simply free-hand sharpen my tools on a belt sander & touch up with small diamond homes.
I finally smartened up and moved my belt grinder right beside the lathe--makes touch-ups quick. Easy to put a quick edge on the gouge (I use the slack part of the belt) but I've not quite perfected getting the edge I want on the skew.

Regards,
Michael
Michael - There is a member in the local club who has been turning for 35 years and has been using a belt sander for sharpening for many years. He even has an article in the AAW magazine about converting a belt sander by reversing the direction and setting up jigs. According to him, you will still need to hone a skew to get a proper edge.
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Old 08-28-2016, 10:17 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mecompco View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Not necessarily a recommended approach, but I simply free-hand sharpen my tools on a belt sander & touch up with small diamond homes.
I finally smartened up and moved my belt grinder right beside the lathe--makes touch-ups quick. Easy to put a quick edge on the gouge (I use the slack part of the belt) but I've not quite perfected getting the edge I want on the skew.

Regards,
Michael
Michael - There is a member in the local club who has been turning for 35 years and has been using a belt sander for sharpening for many years. He even has an article in the AAW magazine about converting a belt sander by reversing the direction and setting up jigs. According to him, you will still need to hone a skew to get a proper edge.
Jim, is that article available on-line by any chance? I use a normal-running belt sander, but I can see that a reverse-running one would be more efficient & I'd like to see his jigs.
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Old 08-28-2016, 10:33 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimB View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by mecompco View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Not necessarily a recommended approach, but I simply free-hand sharpen my tools on a belt sander & touch up with small diamond homes.
I finally smartened up and moved my belt grinder right beside the lathe--makes touch-ups quick. Easy to put a quick edge on the gouge (I use the slack part of the belt) but I've not quite perfected getting the edge I want on the skew.

Regards,
Michael
Michael - There is a member in the local club who has been turning for 35 years and has been using a belt sander for sharpening for many years. He even has an article in the AAW magazine about converting a belt sander by reversing the direction and setting up jigs. According to him, you will still need to hone a skew to get a proper edge.
Jim, is that article available on-line by any chance? I use a normal-running belt sander, but I can see that a reverse-running one would be more efficient & I'd like to see his jigs.
Edgar - his website is truecreations.biz. Once there click on the woodturning section. There is a link on the bottom left or you can click on his Tips and Articles section and it is listed there. If you are a AAW member it is in the December 2012 edition of American Woodturner.
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Old 08-28-2016, 01:36 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimB View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by mecompco View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Not necessarily a recommended approach, but I simply free-hand sharpen my tools on a belt sander & touch up with small diamond homes.
I finally smartened up and moved my belt grinder right beside the lathe--makes touch-ups quick. Easy to put a quick edge on the gouge (I use the slack part of the belt) but I've not quite perfected getting the edge I want on the skew.

Regards,
Michael
Michael - There is a member in the local club who has been turning for 35 years and has been using a belt sander for sharpening for many years. He even has an article in the AAW magazine about converting a belt sander by reversing the direction and setting up jigs. According to him, you will still need to hone a skew to get a proper edge.
Jim, is that article available on-line by any chance? I use a normal-running belt sander, but I can see that a reverse-running one would be more efficient & I'd like to see his jigs.
Not sure why a reversed belt is a good idea. Don't grinding wheels turn towards one? When you sharpen a knife, don't you "cut" into the stone? When you're grinding a knife blade, your edge is up into the "incoming" belt. Why would a lathe chisel be any different? If I'm missing something, please educate me.
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Old 08-28-2016, 01:52 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mecompco View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimB View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by mecompco View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
Not necessarily a recommended approach, but I simply free-hand sharpen my tools on a belt sander & touch up with small diamond homes.
I finally smartened up and moved my belt grinder right beside the lathe--makes touch-ups quick. Easy to put a quick edge on the gouge (I use the slack part of the belt) but I've not quite perfected getting the edge I want on the skew.

Regards,
Michael
Michael - There is a member in the local club who has been turning for 35 years and has been using a belt sander for sharpening for many years. He even has an article in the AAW magazine about converting a belt sander by reversing the direction and setting up jigs. According to him, you will still need to hone a skew to get a proper edge.
Jim, is that article available on-line by any chance? I use a normal-running belt sander, but I can see that a reverse-running one would be more efficient & I'd like to see his jigs.
Not sure why a reversed belt is a good idea. Don't grinding wheels turn towards one? When you sharpen a knife, don't you "cut" into the stone? When you're grinding a knife blade, your edge is up into the "incoming" belt. Why would a lathe chisel be any different? If I'm missing something, please educate me.
I am guessing it doesn't have to do with the sharpening process but rather with eliminating the risk of catching the belt with the tool and ripping it.

Also, he Replaced the disc with a wheel to hone/polish chisels. That you need going away from you. I know he uses that on gouges with a flute to get the flute smooth which gives you a better edge.
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Last edited by JimB; 08-28-2016 at 01:55 PM.
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