Drilling with accuracy on a wood lathe - International Association of Penturners
     International Association of Penturners
Pens for Service Members
 
Support The IAP

Go Back   International Association of Penturners > Community Forums > Advanced Pen Making
  Forgot Password
Register FAQ Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Advanced Pen Making Kit-less construction; designs and challenges beyond those normally associated with kit pens.


Logged on members can hide ads!

Welcome to penturners.org!

You've found the home of The International Association of Penturners. You are currently viewing our site as a guest, which gives you limited access to view discussions, photos, and library articles.

Consider joining our community today. You'll have full access to all of our content, be able to enter our contests, find local chapters near you, and post your questions and share your experience with our members all over the world.

Membership is completely free!!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-16-2014, 10:30 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Tucson
Posts: 13
Photos: 0

Default Drilling with accuracy on a wood lathe

I would like to know how some of you drill (accurately) on a wood lathe. I use a drill chuck that fits into the MT2 on the tail stock. As soon as I loosen the quill to advance the drill, it chatters and wobbles all over the place, even if I am holding it at the base of the chuck to steady it.

The other alternative I have tried is to keep the quill locked, and just manually push the tail stock in slowly. But it's the same issue... once the tail stock is loosened, there is too much play and the end of the drill dances back and forth making a very inaccurate hole.

I use a 60 degree center starter before I drill. But I am not happy with these results. This kind of wobble is not nearly precise enough for the close tolerances needed to make a kitless pen. Is there a better way to secure a drill, than using this MT chuck?
penfetish is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-16-2014, 10:37 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 1,075
Photos: 0

Default

What has worked for me is to lock the tailstock with the bit real close to the blank.
Then tighten the quill down and then back it off just slightly to allow the handwheel to advance the bit. You need to go real slow here so the bit is barely digging in. Once the bit has advanced about 3/16" you can loosen the quill more and advance faster.
I also pre-start the holes either with a center bit or with a round flat tool. It is important that there is no material in the center of the started hole to allow the end of the bit to go off center.
__________________

Likes: (1)
Dale Allen is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-16-2014, 10:54 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
BSea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Little Rock, Arkansas
Posts: 4,547
Photos: 40

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dale Allen View Post
What has worked for me is to lock the tailstock with the bit real close to the blank.
Then tighten the quill down and then back it off just slightly to allow the handwheel to advance the bit. You need to go real slow here so the bit is barely digging in. Once the bit has advanced about 3/16" you can loosen the quill more and advance faster.
I also pre-start the holes either with a center bit or with a round flat tool. It is important that there is no material in the center of the started hole to allow the end of the bit to go off center.
That's about what I do. But what do you mean by starting the hole with a round flat tool?

About the only other thing I do when I really want a good true hole is to drill a pilot hole about 1/16" smaller than the final hole.
__________________
Bob

Central Arkansas IAP Chapter Member
BSea is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Advertisement
Old 05-16-2014, 10:59 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Tucson
Posts: 13
Photos: 0

Default

Thanks Dale. I think part of the problem is the length of the drill + the length of the chuck holding the drill, makes for a very long extension and the vibration gets magnified. I have tried your method, but perhaps I loosened the quill too much at first. It seems the taper in the tail stock has a lot of play in it as soon as the quill is loosened.
penfetish is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-16-2014, 11:28 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
its_virgil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Wichita Falls, TX, USA.
Posts: 6,829
Photos: 74

Default

I put the blank between centers and turn it round then cut into the needed two (or one) parts. i hold the blank with my collet chuck then drill. I make a lot of one piece slim lines and drill from both ends with a standard size bit and the two holes meet dead on. Drilling on the lathe is a very accurate way to drill. I also use a center drill.
Do a good turn daily!
Don
__________________
Don Ward aka its_virgil
Wichita Falls, Texas
www.RedRiverPens.com
www.RedRiverPens.com/articles (pen stuff I've written)
its_virgil is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-16-2014, 11:49 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
Laurenr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Spokane Valley, Washington
Posts: 295
Photos: 96

Default

This issue has driven me crazy for years. So crazy that I finally bought a metal lathe. With the metal lathe I can drill with complete accuracy. I suggest that if accuracy is as important to you as it is to me, you might want to bite the bullet and purchase a metal lathe.

While using a wood lathe, I found that using a collet chuck helps, but only if you have the blank very evenly rounded. Center drills, pilot holes, slow speed, sharpened bits, and reamers, will help also. A center drill will also help with drifting when using a drill press.

The bottom line is that wood lathes are just not made for the kind of accuracy needed for kitless pen making. Yes, it can be done, much better by some than others, (and no doubt we'll hear from a few directly after I post this), but if you are asking this question, I'm guessing you won't be happy until you have a metal lathe. IMHO.

Lauren
__________________
Life's heaviest burden is having nothing to carry.
Laurenr is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-17-2014, 12:16 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
johncrane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Posts: 8,652
Photos: 190

Default

I also do what Don suggest.
__________________

SUCH IS LIFE. Down Under.
johncrane is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-17-2014, 01:05 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Tucson
Posts: 13
Photos: 0

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurenr View Post
This issue has driven me crazy for years. So crazy that I finally bought a metal lathe.

Lauren
I have been thinking about this very same thing, and spent the last hour looking at metal lathes. It's a whole other animal! But I agree, the lack of precision is driving me crazy, too.

I have spent days making fountain pen sections, and every one of them comes out differently - using the same tools - because there is too much play in the tail stock when drilling. It affects the threads when tapping, it enlarges the 1/4" bore where the converter fits in, and where the nib housing meets - the opening is oval. Measure, measure, measure, drill ... start over.

I suspect this what they call chasing the dragon.
penfetish is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-17-2014, 08:24 AM   #9 (permalink)
 
duncsuss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Wilmington, MA
Posts: 1,215
Photos: 1

Default

You haven't said what brand or model lathe you own, but there's a possibility you could improve things by fixing your tailstock so it doesn't have nearly so much play.

For example, you could add shims to the guide plate under the tailstock (the one that's supposed to keep it perfectly centered and aligned along the axis). Then at least you'd have it starting out pointing the right direction.
Likes: (1)
duncsuss is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-17-2014, 08:32 AM   #10 (permalink)
 
Dan Masshardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
Posts: 4,794
Photos: 0

Default

The lathe question is a good one.

What are you using to hold the blank?

Except for kitness style stuff, I don't see why extreme accuracy is so vital.

I get good accuracy. With my nova chuck.

And epoxy always makes up any difference. For gluing tubes in that is.
Dan Masshardt is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Related Content
Logged on members can hide ads
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
drilling

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:04 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0

Content Copyright © 2003-2016 by Penturners.org, LLC; All Rights Reserved
Terms Of Service   Acceptable Use Policy