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Old 11-13-2018, 07:28 PM   #11 (permalink)
 
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My first thought is that, when viewed from the side, whether the side cutting edge is straight or curved would depend on how the gouge is manipulated during sharpening.

When he visited the Cincinnati woodturning group's meeting recently, Doug Thompson said the V gouge has the smallest sweet spot but gives him a better cut than a similar U gouge.

Could the original poster explain how the catches are occurring?
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Old 11-13-2018, 07:37 PM   #12 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donstephan View Post
My first thought is that, when viewed from the side, whether the side cutting edge is straight or curved would depend on how the gouge is manipulated during sharpening.

When he visited the Cincinnati woodturning group's meeting recently, Doug Thompson said the V gouge has the smallest sweet spot but gives him a better cut than a similar U gouge.

Could the original poster explain how the catches are occurring?
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Old 11-13-2018, 08:43 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Thank you for the insight, Jim. That is helpful, and makes complete sense about the curved wing. I do have another bowl gouge from a cheap HSS set. I think I'll try turning a couple using that to see if I notice a difference and can work on my technique before going back to the Thompson.

Would it be possible to grind the Thompson differently so it has straight wings instead of curved, or would that be a waste if I can just practice on the other gouge first?
The short answer is yes, you can regrind it so it is straight. Bowl gouges, like all other HSS gouges, can be reshaped rather easily. The harder part is getting the original shape back if you want it back that way. Doug Thompson provides instructions with his gouges that tell you how to set your Wolverine jig (if you have one) to maintain the gouge the way he shaped it. I donít know how easy it is to get it back with those settings.

I would recommend using your other bowl gouge first and see how you do with it. That will at least give you an idea about your technique and if that is your problem.
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Old 11-14-2018, 07:29 PM   #14 (permalink)
 
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Thanks again for the tips.

donstephan - recently I was getting a lot of catches when trying to hollow out. I hadn't used it in a while, but I was having a hard time with it not catching/skipping when I was trying to start the cut to make the hollowing cut. I ruined the rim on one piece doing that. I'm guessing I just had it at the wrong angle so it caught and was thrown out (I was bracing it with my thumb/hand to try to prevent this, but it didn't stop it).

Hollowing tends to be the more difficult part for me.
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Old 11-14-2018, 08:19 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Noot17 View Post
Thanks again for the tips.

donstephan - recently I was getting a lot of catches when trying to hollow out. I hadn't used it in a while, but I was having a hard time with it not catching/skipping when I was trying to start the cut to make the hollowing cut. I ruined the rim on one piece doing that. I'm guessing I just had it at the wrong angle so it caught and was thrown out (I was bracing it with my thumb/hand to try to prevent this, but it didn't stop it).

Hollowing tends to be the more difficult part for me.

Here are a couple tips on getting the hollowing cuts started without the gouge skating across the rim.

First, you need to make sure the bevel of your bowl gouge is at 90 degrees to the bowl rim or at the angle which you want the cut to go. The cut follows the bevel. Also, your gouge needs to be closed....top of flute at 3:00 so the cutting edge is plumb as you start the cut. After you have the tip in the wood( and have bevel support), you can open the flute to get a good cutting edge.

Next method is to use your parting tool and putting a groove in the top of your blank where your cut will go. This will provide an edge for the bevel of your bowl gouge to ride on as you start your cut.

Hope this helps.
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Old 11-15-2018, 07:14 AM   #16 (permalink)
 
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Eric; Charlie's suggestion about AAW is an excellent one! AAW chapters often have "mentors" that can show you the cuts and generally help you. Nothing beats having someone stand beside you! Click here to find an AAW chapter near you.

Our local club meeting was last Tuesday and the topic was "Rough Turning A Bowl". Very informative.
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Old 11-16-2018, 02:55 PM   #17 (permalink)
 
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Thank you for the helpful information again!

I'll see what I can do to find a mentor/coach, and will keep practicing in the meantime.
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:43 PM   #18 (permalink)
 
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Basically you want to bring the gouge to the wood in a neutral presentation, so that the gouge doesn't try to move in any direction.

1. For me, the top of the tool rest is just below the center of the bowl blank (i.e. the axis of the lathe).

2. The tool is horizontal, i.e. parallel to the lathe axis, and when placed on the tool rest the middle of the gouge should be at the height of the lathe axis. Adjust the height of the tool rest if necessary.

3. The flute or hollow portion of the gouge should point to the right, sometimes referred to as facing 3 o'clock.

4. The cutting edge bevel at the gouge nose should be perpendicular to the surface of the wood it is about to touch.

You might want to experiment with some different variations on the presentation first, to see first hand what happens. Rotate the lathe spindle (and the bowl blank) by hand using the handwheel as the nose of the gouge is presented to the wood, or have someone rotate the handwheel for you if necessary. At hand rotation speeds you will see exactly what would happen at several hundred RPM's without unpleasantness.
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Old 11-16-2018, 08:43 PM   #19 (permalink)
 
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Thanks for the tips. I'll try rotating by hand. Seems like a better way to practice without ruining anything :)


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Old 11-28-2018, 06:55 PM   #20 (permalink)
 
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Its been quite awhile since I have turned and just getting back into it. But, a lot of variables will be associated with your grind. There are many ways to grind a gouge and learning the right technique for your grind is important. It took me a couple of years of heavy turning to finally settle upon a favorite grind
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