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Old 06-02-2018, 11:43 AM   #11 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtriever View Post
1. As JT said, the t-track needs to be recessed into the template;

2. also, the clamps need to be relocated so you can clamp short pieces closer to the blade.

3. Looking at it again, if the t-track is top-mounted along the edge of the angled templates it would work. Personally, for greater support I'd still prefer to see it recessed about an inch or so back from the edge of the templates.
Thanks for your feed-back.

1. They are recessed into the 3/4" jigs but this preliminary drawing doesn't show it.

2. Agree. I will do that.

3. I will experiment with a couple of different configurations. I was thinking of recessing a couple of horizontal mounting holes for additional support. Also, epoxying the rail to the jig might add additional support.

Note: I don't have an image of the horizontal toggle clamp with a transparent background so this looks a little kludgy.
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Old 06-03-2018, 12:45 PM   #12 (permalink)
 
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I love jigs and made many and will continue to make them as needed. I looked at your diagram a couple times and have to say I do not understand it at all. I can not for the life of me figure out where the stock goes and where the jig portion goes. I am looking at the tracks and looks like you have the stock up against the track which is a no-no. I know I am missing something but if you are using this as a plan to make these for sale better plans with better detail are needed. Would like to see something with more detail and description if possible. Show where the blade is in relation to things. Show a blank on the jig. I could not make any more suggestions because I do not understand it. Sorry.

I too own 2 Dubby sleds but still made dedicated sleds for segmenting pen blanks. Cutting blanks to length does not require special sleds. Just a miter gauge.
================================================== ==============================================

Per your request, here are a couple of drawings showing a vertical cut (page 2) and a horizontal cut (page 3). If you want to make an angle cut then one of the desired angle jigs fit on the left side of the sled replacing the horizontal jig. The vertical jig, on the right side of the sled, just gets slid to the right out of the way. It could be removed but there is no need. Let me know if you have any further questions.

================================================== ==============================================
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ultimate-pen-segmenting-sled-upss-page-1.jpg   ultimate-pen-segmenting-sled-upss-page-2.jpg   ultimate-pen-segmenting-sled-upss-page-3.jpg  

Last edited by GDIS46; 06-03-2018 at 01:15 PM.
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Old 06-03-2018, 01:03 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Some observations:
1) With the vertical cut, the sled is nearly sliced in half. The only support holding the halves of the 1/2" birch together are the end fences. I think you will have to worry about flexing and warping.
2) When making the horizontal cut, the vertical template will need to be moved way back to prevent the cut off piece from potentially jamming against the template.
3) I assume this sled only fits one model or make of table saw since the runners are not adjustable.
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Old 06-03-2018, 03:28 PM   #14 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jttheclockman View Post
I love jigs and made many and will continue to make them as needed. I looked at your diagram a couple times and have to say I do not understand it at all. I can not for the life of me figure out where the stock goes and where the jig portion goes. I am looking at the tracks and looks like you have the stock up against the track which is a no-no. I know I am missing something but if you are using this as a plan to make these for sale better plans with better detail are needed. Would like to see something with more detail and description if possible. Show where the blade is in relation to things. Show a blank on the jig. I could not make any more suggestions because I do not understand it. Sorry.

I too own 2 Dubby sleds but still made dedicated sleds for segmenting pen blanks. Cutting blanks to length does not require special sleds. Just a miter gauge.
================================================== ==============================================

Per your request, here are a couple of drawings showing a vertical cut (page 2) and a horizontal cut (page 3). If you want to make an angle cut then one of the desired angle jigs fit on the left side of the sled replacing the horizontal jig. The vertical jig, on the right side of the sled, just gets slid to the right out of the way. It could be removed but there is no need. Let me know if you have any further questions.

================================================== ==============================================

hello Gary

I see you are determined down this path. OK first off I do not see a need for that pink cut off part of the sled. You have to determine what side of the blade you want to make your cuts. Being it is a sled it does not matter just where you put your jigs. That piece that you have to make the 90 degree cutoffs just make that square to your blade so that it is 90 degrees for the cutoffs and 0 degrees for the slicing. Now recess a track in the top of this block holding back about 1" so that you can use a stop block and or just a clamp. They make both that ride in tracks. The reason I said you never ever run stock against a track is you are both counting they were manufactured to extreme tolerances and also when clamping something in them can distort the edge cause an inaccurate edge. Why take that chance. The more possible flaws you take out of the jig the better you are. Thus the reason for a jig in the first place.

You need to make the front and back rails about 4 " high to give rigidity to the jig. Remember you are cutting at least 1-1/2" deep into those rails with the thickness of material. I would make the back rail thick so that you can not push the blade through it when cutting or make a guard over the blade exit slot to protect yourself because sometimes the mind lapses and we forget the blade exiting that back rail and if that is where you set your hands up it could be a problem.

Next all those preset angles all all made predicating on a few things and that is your blade is set the same all the time it is used. There is no play in the rails that slide in the miter slots, and that the jig itself stays true and does not warp. The angles need to be cut after the back rail is set on the jig and are now cut in reference to that rail. It will take some exact measuring when doing this. You can not cut the angles using a miter gauge and then attach to the sled unless you do all cutting and marking off of the blade. That is the only true constant when making any sled. And again with those angle pieces I would use a track dadoed into the block about 1" in and use the same type clamps and stop blocks. The bottom track needs to be cut into the sled to accommodate the sliding bolt setup you are thinking.

The comparison to the dubby sled is an accurate one because it is doing similar to what you are attempting accept that it has tracks built into the top and side of the adjustable fence. yes it does not have a platform on both sides of the blade but one can be put there very easily. I have done this many times. The advantage of a dubby cutoff sled is it is infinite in adjustability with any angle you can think off. Plus you can do compound cutting without messing up the jig.

Not sure if I was clear on my suggestions but good luck as you move forward.
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Last edited by jttheclockman; 06-03-2018 at 03:33 PM.
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Old 06-03-2018, 09:22 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillerTurnings View Post
Some observations:
1) With the vertical cut, the sled is nearly sliced in half. The only support holding the halves of the 1/2" birch together are the end fences. I think you will have to worry about flexing and warping.
2) When making the horizontal cut, the vertical template will need to be moved way back to prevent the cut off piece from potentially jamming against the template.
3) I assume this sled only fits one model or make of table saw since the runners are not adjustable.
Thank you for your feedback.

1. Yes, the sled is cut in half as most sleds for traditional woodworking are. Perhaps the sled base should be increased to 3/4" Baltic Birch plywood but with 3/4" thick jigs, it limits the effective blade cutting height.

2. The vertical jig can be totally removed from the sled if clearance is a concern when doing other cuts.

3. I am not making it for resale so I don't care if it will transport from one saw to the next. If anyone wants to make one, they would make it for their particular saw. But that brings up another question. Are table saw runners standardized? I don't know.
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Old 06-03-2018, 10:03 PM   #16 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillerTurnings View Post
Some observations:
1) With the vertical cut, the sled is nearly sliced in half. The only support holding the halves of the 1/2" birch together are the end fences. I think you will have to worry about flexing and warping.
2) When making the horizontal cut, the vertical template will need to be moved way back to prevent the cut off piece from potentially jamming against the template.
3) I assume this sled only fits one model or make of table saw since the runners are not adjustable.
Thank you for your feedback.

1. Yes, the sled is cut in half as most sleds for traditional woodworking are. Perhaps the sled base should be increased to 3/4" Baltic Birch plywood but with 3/4" thick jigs, it limits the effective blade cutting height.

2. The vertical jig can be totally removed from the sled if clearance is a concern when doing other cuts.

3. I am not making it for resale so I don't care if it will transport from one saw to the next. If anyone wants to make one, they would make it for their particular saw. But that brings up another question. Are table saw runners standardized? I don't know.

The answer to this question is no. The larger saws on the market are 3/4" wide . slots Depth could vary. Table top models and micro saws all could be different. Makes no difference because as I said each sled must be made off the blade's axis. The back fence needs to be 90 degrees to the side of the blade and all jigs need to work off that. You can not use the miter slots as your bench mark. This goes for any type saw including bandsaws.

The base of the sled needs to be 3/4" for stability and for allowing those tracks underneath for the hold down bolts you show. When you say depth of cut is a concern then you are not working with a 10" blade. If you are working with a 10" full size saw and using a 7-1/4" blade for thinness, they do make thin 10" saw blades too.

I believe there are examples of this type sleds in the library here. You may want to check it out or do a google search for other examples and it may inspire you more so. Good luck.
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Old 06-03-2018, 10:29 PM   #17 (permalink)
 
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If you already know this, my apologies in advance. - - Most, but not all miter slots are 3/4 inch wide by approx 3/8 deep. Measure yours to determine the size of the runner(s). The blade should be aligned to the miter slot and then the front and rear fences are aligned perpendicular to that.
A 3/4 base will leave you plenty of blade height for pen segmenting cuts. Unlike some, I make my sleds from 3/4 MDF instead of plywood since MDF is less likely to deform.

Good luck with your project, and post pics when it's finished!
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Old 06-04-2018, 12:51 AM   #18 (permalink)
 
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I know people like to build a better mousetrap but I believe in this case there are better ideas for a segmenting sled on the net. I also believe an adjustable fence is the way to go. here is an example and there are a ton more if you do a google search for segmenting tablesaw sleds.

http://lumberjocks.com/assets/pictur...cts/494063.jpg
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Old 06-04-2018, 05:41 AM   #19 (permalink)
 
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I'd add that given the size of the pieces we work with a sled is a must. A friend of mine lost all the fingers of his left hand last week (they were able to reattach them) on his table saw. Table saws are the most dangerous of the equipment we work with and every precaution should be taken. Hands should never, ever get near the blade.
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:52 AM   #20 (permalink)
 
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I'd add that given the size of the pieces we work with a sled is a must. A friend of mine lost all the fingers of his left hand last week (they were able to reattach them) on his table saw. Table saws are the most dangerous of the equipment we work with and every precaution should be taken. Hands should never, ever get near the blade.
Sorry to read this. I will say this and I always disagree with this statement that the tablesaw is the most dangerous tool in the shop. I believe it is the operator that is the most dangerous. All machines are dangerous and having the knowledge to operate them properly and safely is a must. Tablesaws get the bad rap because they probably are the most common tool in a woodworking shop. But I believe the more dangerous tool is a router. That bit spins at a higher rate than a blade and is exposed alot more in the operations it is asked to perform than a tablesaw blade if a guard is not used. Weather set up in a table or free hand the power to do instant harm is tremendous. Again if wood is fed into the bit the wrong way or not secured properly can be very harmful and there are alot more bits and operations to choose from to use a router. But more people use a tablesaw than routers.

With that said having a working knowledge and being aware of every move with each operation of tool is paramount when it comes to shop safety. Do not work with tools when in a hurry, do not become complacent, do not work with tools when tired and use and follow all safety precautions when working with any tools in the shop. Work safe and work smart.
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