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Old 04-21-2018, 07:38 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
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Default Trying to setup sharpening system for tools???

Ok, I am fairly new to this and have been told that I am not all there in the head anymore, but I have a few questions. It may be slapping me in the face I just have not figured it out yet.......I have bought the Wolverine Sharpening Jigs and the Raptor Tools for the correct degrees on the tools. However the .pdf that comes with this tool shows using a 23 degree setup on the Vari Grind Jig Arm. I have upgraded to the Vari Grind 2 sharpening jig. Would I set it up the same way??? Any help from anybody using this system would be appreciated. Thanks
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Old 04-21-2018, 10:28 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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What I am about to tell you goes out the window if you are looking to change the angle on your tools that you have already. people will do this on occassion when they are looking to try different cuts for different woods or material. I do not suggest this till you get better at what you are doing.

So my suggestion is weather you use this jig you have or another jig for some other reason, forget about angles and gauges for now. Just take your tool and insert it in the jig holder the distance they recommend and then lay the jig in the bottom arm and lay the tool on the wheel that you are using. Now adjust the arm in or out till the tool blade lays flat on the wheel matching the grind that is on the cutting tool now. Lock in place and you have the angle. Those jigs are nice for beginners but after awhile they are a pain. Many people just lay the tool on the tool rest and adjust the angle till they get the tool to rest flat on the wheel and after a few practices you get the feel of how to sharpen each tool. Weather you have to roll it or sweep it.

One little trick is to take a sharpie and blacken the cutting edge the entire cutting edge. When you get your so called jig set up spin the wheel by hand as you rest the tool on the wheel and look at the scratch marks on the cutting edge. You should be removing the sharpie mark evenly. If not adjust the angle some more and repeat. You could turn the grinder on and lightly touch the tool to the wheel if you do not feel comfortable spinning by hand. But you have one chance to see copy the angle the tool is at the present so pay attention. Anything after that will match the angle YOU grind it at.

Hope this makes sense.
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Old 04-21-2018, 10:50 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jttheclockman View Post
What I am about to tell you goes out the window if you are looking to change the angle on your tools that you have already. people will do this on occassion when they are looking to try different cuts for different woods or material. I do not suggest this till you get better at what you are doing.

So my suggestion is weather you use this jig you have or another jig for some other reason, forget about angles and gauges for now. Just take your tool and insert it in the jig holder the distance they recommend and then lay the jig in the bottom arm and lay the tool on the wheel that you are using. Now adjust the arm in or out till the tool blade lays flat on the wheel matching the grind that is on the cutting tool now. Lock in place and you have the angle. Those jigs are nice for beginners but after awhile they are a pain. Many people just lay the tool on the tool rest and adjust the angle till they get the tool to rest flat on the wheel and after a few practices you get the feel of how to sharpen each tool. Weather you have to roll it or sweep it.

One little trick is to take a sharpie and blacken the cutting edge the entire cutting edge. When you get your so called jig set up spin the wheel by hand as you rest the tool on the wheel and look at the scratch marks on the cutting edge. You should be removing the sharpie mark evenly. If not adjust the angle some more and repeat. You could turn the grinder on and lightly touch the tool to the wheel if you do not feel comfortable spinning by hand. But you have one chance to see copy the angle the tool is at the present so pay attention. Anything after that will match the angle YOU grind it at.

Hope this makes sense.

John has a great suggestion, that is the way I have done it for years.
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Old 04-21-2018, 11:09 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Great, Thanks that is where I will start and get lots of practice.

God Bless!
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Old 04-22-2018, 11:29 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
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For some reason I have never seen discussion of how the sharpened tip should look after sharpening. It would seem very easy to remove too much metal at one or more places along the bevel, rendering a tool sharpened at the same angle every time but a less than ideal shape. It would seem this knowledge and understanding would be very helpful for those using jigs, especially those new to sharpening and using lathe tools.

I sharpen freehand using a Robo Rest, which makes for extremely quick and easy sharpening for a variety of gouge angles and scrapers during turning of a bowl, so I can't offer suggestions on the jig.
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Old 04-22-2018, 11:44 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by donstephan View Post
For some reason I have never seen discussion of how the sharpened tip should look after sharpening. It would seem very easy to remove too much metal at one or more places along the bevel, rendering a tool sharpened at the same angle every time but a less than ideal shape. It would seem this knowledge and understanding would be very helpful for those using jigs, especially those new to sharpening and using lathe tools.

I sharpen freehand using a Robo Rest, which makes for extremely quick and easy sharpening for a variety of gouge angles and scrapers during turning of a bowl, so I can't offer suggestions on the jig.

Don it is difficult to explain sharpening without photos and I do not have the time to look up google for videos and photos. Telling someone to do a search is forbidden words here because it brings out the etiquette police here. But sometimes words can not answer a question alone and this is the case here. IN MY OPINION. (better put a smiley face here too) There are tons of videos on the net showing sharpening using jigs and no jigs. But I will say my trick with the marker will get you there without removing too much material if you are careful. As soon as all the marker is gone then the angle is sharpened all along the cutting edge. Is it a perfect angle no one here can tell you that. If you sharpen the same way on both side of the tool the way I said you will get a sharp tool. Now other factors come into play what was the angle before you sharpened and was it what you find good?? What kind of tool is it?? Is it a cheap Harbor Freight metal or a higher grade of steel?? How are you presenting tool to the wood or other material and it is proper?? Is your wheel of good quality and dressed properly?? Are you grinding equal amounts of material off each side of tool?? So many other factors go into sharpening. When you get proficient at it yes no jigs are needed, just a good tool rest. That is all I do now. I have those jigs when I started and now they collect dust.
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Last edited by jttheclockman; 04-22-2018 at 11:46 AM.
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Old 04-22-2018, 01:08 PM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jttheclockman View Post
What I am about to tell you goes out the window if you are looking to change the angle on your tools that you have already. people will do this on occassion when they are looking to try different cuts for different woods or material. I do not suggest this till you get better at what you are doing.

So my suggestion is weather you use this jig you have or another jig for some other reason, forget about angles and gauges for now. Just take your tool and insert it in the jig holder the distance they recommend and then lay the jig in the bottom arm and lay the tool on the wheel that you are using. Now adjust the arm in or out till the tool blade lays flat on the wheel matching the grind that is on the cutting tool now. Lock in place and you have the angle. Those jigs are nice for beginners but after awhile they are a pain. Many people just lay the tool on the tool rest and adjust the angle till they get the tool to rest flat on the wheel and after a few practices you get the feel of how to sharpen each tool. Weather you have to roll it or sweep it.

One little trick is to take a sharpie and blacken the cutting edge the entire cutting edge. When you get your so called jig set up spin the wheel by hand as you rest the tool on the wheel and look at the scratch marks on the cutting edge. You should be removing the sharpie mark evenly. If not adjust the angle some more and repeat. You could turn the grinder on and lightly touch the tool to the wheel if you do not feel comfortable spinning by hand. But you have one chance to see copy the angle the tool is at the present so pay attention. Anything after that will match the angle YOU grind it at.

Hope this makes sense.
This is the most common-sense approach, and it will work for those of us who are more interested in turning than sharpening. Well done- do this!
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Old 04-22-2018, 01:17 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jttheclockman View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by donstephan View Post
For some reason I have never seen discussion of how the sharpened tip should look after sharpening. It would seem very easy to remove too much metal at one or more places along the bevel, rendering a tool sharpened at the same angle every time but a less than ideal shape. It would seem this knowledge and understanding would be very helpful for those using jigs, especially those new to sharpening and using lathe tools.

I sharpen freehand using a Robo Rest, which makes for extremely quick and easy sharpening for a variety of gouge angles and scrapers during turning of a bowl, so I can't offer suggestions on the jig.

Don it is difficult to explain sharpening without photos and I do not have the time to look up google for videos and photos. Telling someone to do a search is forbidden words here because it brings out the etiquette police here. But sometimes words can not answer a question alone and this is the case here. IN MY OPINION. (better put a smiley face here too) There are tons of videos on the net showing sharpening using jigs and no jigs. But I will say my trick with the marker will get you there without removing too much material if you are careful. As soon as all the marker is gone then the angle is sharpened all along the cutting edge. Is it a perfect angle no one here can tell you that. If you sharpen the same way on both side of the tool the way I said you will get a sharp tool. Now other factors come into play what was the angle before you sharpened and was it what you find good?? What kind of tool is it?? Is it a cheap Harbor Freight metal or a higher grade of steel?? How are you presenting tool to the wood or other material and it is proper?? Is your wheel of good quality and dressed properly?? Are you grinding equal amounts of material off each side of tool?? So many other factors go into sharpening. When you get proficient at it yes no jigs are needed, just a good tool rest. That is all I do now. I have those jigs when I started and now they collect dust.

And I skipped past all of that...and reverted back to my youth when I was taught to use a stone on a bench. I still have a flat stone and a curved one - carved before I turned. Sharpening on a stone on a bench is another practice that gives one time to think. (Imagine of that, boys...when you get REALLY proficient, you might be sharpening without electricity. Next thing you know, they'll want to make ink paste, shove it in a plastic tube and call it a "ballpoint" instead of using real ink. What will they think of next?)
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