Lathe Chisel /Grind/ Purpose Chart? - International Association of Penturners
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Old 06-10-2018, 07:33 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Lathe Chisel /Grind/ Purpose Chart?

Is there a chart that describes:
Which lathe chisel to use for what cut?
. . . Or what is the purpose of each chisel type for its specialty of cut?
Which Grind /Shape to use for what cut?

Thanks for any help. I am trying to expand my lathe language and communication ability.

I am an AAW member but I have never figured out how to find things there.
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Old 06-11-2018, 07:03 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
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https://www.google.com/search?source....0.ndmnQ5PkkPU

look at the images

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Old 06-11-2018, 07:11 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Hank; You are correct, the AAW Journal index is hideous to use and search. Maybe they could improve it.

I doubt there is any standard nomenclature for the different cuts. But I am interested in the results of your query.... The first step in knowledge is to ask a question.

There are only two different ways to cut wood. Scrapes and cuts.

Scrape: The tool is presented to the wood with the bevel NOT in contact with the wood.

Cut: The tool is presented to the wood with the bevel in contact with the wood and supporting the cutting edge.
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Old 06-11-2018, 07:20 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by its_virgil View Post
https://www.google.com/search?source....0.ndmnQ5PkkPU

look at the images

Do a good turn daily!
Don
Thanks Don, that is much more than I was expecting. PLENTY of information there.

I am supposed to be in some meetings all day (in Dallas) but with a bad summer cold and watery eyes, I will stay in at my daughters home and read on this all day. I still have 2 more days of meetings after today, so I won't feel guilty missing today.
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Old 06-11-2018, 07:34 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Randy,

I have tools that I have never used and I have a few bowl (spindle) tools and gouges that I want to try. I bought the Grizzly wet slow grinder 3 or 4 years ago and used it initially for sharpening the already used tools. That worked great, but when I needed to bring my dozen or so unused tools to shape, I discovered the drawback to the Grizzly - needing a full day dedicated to nothing but grinding. Disciplined people will do this. (OK, I confess, I have been lazy.) I now have two CBN wheels, and bringing to shape will be fairly quick. JimB reminded me to use LIGHT touches with the CBN, so I will practice and experiment with that.

That brings me to the fact that I need to use my other tools. I think that by starting off with pen turning, we ("I") tend to not use a lot of tools, and as a result miss out on some great experiences and chances to expand our (my) skill levels.
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Old 06-11-2018, 09:46 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Hank - you ask a good question but unfortunately there isn’t a simple answer. There is information out there from various places but it is all incomplete because the options are almost unlimited. What i mean is each turning tool can be used to do many different cuts and each cut can be done with multiple tools. When you add in how many ways you can shape and reshape the tools the list of combinations becomes endless.

Let’s say you want to make a candle holder from a 2x2x8 blanks. There are many different tools you could use and each of them can complete the job start to finish. Roughing gouge, Spindle gouge, detail gouge, bowl gouge and skew are all good tools to use. Each can do the job start to finish.

Want to roll a bead? It can be done with a detail gouge, skew, bowl gouge.

Want to turn a bowl? A bowl gouge or heavy scraper can do it.

There are a couple NEVER DO THIS situations. The main one is turning a bowl. Never use a skew or a roughing gouge to turn a bowl.

As far as tool shapes go there are so many possibilities. The real trick is to find the one that works for you. For example bowl gouges can have flutes that are V, U or parabolic. Different people, even professional Turners, will make arguments for why one is better then the other for the same cut but they disagree on which one is best. Then there is the bevel angle anywhere from 40* to 65*. Then there's the shape of the grind, often referred to as a fingernail or swept back grind. How far back it should go and how you should set your jig is different Turner to Turner. Or you can free hand sharpen. Then there is the 'standard' or flat across grind used on many 'bottom feeder' or 'finishing' bowl gouges. Bevel angle is often anywhere from 50* to 70*.

As you can see from the brief examples I have given, the possibilities are endless. I have experimented with different combinations on all my tools and also by using tools that belong to other Turners. I have settled on tools and grinds that work for me but for some tools I have multiple tools with different grinds. For example I have 5 bowl gouges, each with a different grind. On the other hand I have 3 skews with identical grinds because that is the only grind that seems to work for me.

The only way to know what works for you is to experiment. Once you find what works for you then you need to duplicate that each time you sharpen. I’ve given turning lessons to many people. Most have never turned before. When they have difficulty with a particular cut I give them a different tool to use for the same cut. That will often make a big difference.
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Old 06-11-2018, 10:50 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Hank,

+1 to what Jim says. I can't really add much along those lines.

Both spindle and faceplate turning are hard to learn on your own.

If you can find some hands-on instruction, that would be great.

If you can't I would suggest the Turning Wood book and DVD by Richard Raffan. There may be others that have come down the pike since, but when I was learning spindle and bowl turning he was the best out there.

After that Richard has additional more in depth books and videos on bowls, boxes, etc.

Just my $.02
Bill
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Old 06-11-2018, 02:13 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Still consider myself to be new at turning but it has been my observation that there are many ways to grind tools and an equal number of ways to use them.
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Old 06-11-2018, 07:50 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Like Bill I would suggest the book and video combinations by Richard Raffan, as well as his design book. For me they are not "one time" read/watch because there is so much in them, but rather reference material to which I refer at least every other month.
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Old 06-13-2018, 05:36 AM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Cannot really add much to information already provided. Having wasted a lot of steel learning how to sharpen my turning tools best advice can give is don't worry too much about bevel angles early on. Took awhile to find best bevel angle that worked best for me on bowl gouges have four each with different bevel angles. Spindle gouges pretty much the same as factory grind within a degree or two.

Would recommend buying an inexpensive or expensive angle finder before attempting to change bevel angles.

My angle checker merely two school protractors fasten together with a small bolt & nut in the middle. When closed it's a full circle. For gouges open laying one side along center of gouge inside the flutes and other end along the bevel. Do the same for my scrapers and chisels (parting tools & skews).
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