Homemade closed-end pen mandrel - International Association of Penturners
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Old 04-16-2018, 03:27 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Homemade closed-end pen mandrel

I've been hoping to try my hand at a few closed end pens, but would like to convert a few existing pen kits, namely a few Raw's. I can't bring myself to order one of the mandrels, having tried some of the "expanding" types for making duck calls. They seem terrible. If you remove and reinstall a pen, they seem to always be a bit off.

For my calls, I machined my own pin mandrel, which works a real treat. However, that's a lot of work and supplies if I wanted a mandrel for each diameter of pen tube I may turn. I've seen some here use some homemade wood mandrels, and I was hoping for some advice on creating my own. Is it as simple as a veeery slight taper and constant use of calipers?

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 04-16-2018, 04:32 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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I have had great success with simply using a Harbor Freight Punch Press Set. I grind a slot in whatever dimeter punch I need, grind down a nail to fit the slot, and use a collet chuck to hold the punch.

With the set, I have every size I need for any pen, it costs less that $15.00 for the entire set, and they still work as punches!
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Old 04-16-2018, 05:18 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
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That's not a bad idea. However, I use those punches in a drill chuck to square my blanks, and some of the most common pen sizes I encounter don't have close enough to what I'd call a "tight fit" to ever want to turn it up to 3k rpm. To me, a proper pin mandrel should be very close to a press fit, and with a few exceptions, I haven't gotten that with those punches.
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Old 04-16-2018, 05:28 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
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In the case of the RAW kit, Iíve made a number of them as closed end. The first couple I made a mandrel, but figured out pretty quickly none is needed at all (if you are using a collet).
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Old 04-16-2018, 05:31 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickR View Post
In the case of the RAW kit, Iíve made a number of them as closed end. The first couple I made a mandrel, but figured out pretty quickly none is needed at all (if you are using a collet).
I've thought about this too. How exactly did you go about it? I've chucked up a spare cap in my collet chuck, and threaded on a whole pen to fix a finishing issue, but it was constantly spinning off thanks to the nice smooth threads.
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Old 04-16-2018, 05:46 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Check out this link. Closed End mandrel idea

and this one http://www.yoyospin.com/baron/

Last edited by dogcatcher; 04-16-2018 at 05:49 PM. Reason: added Yoyo Spin's Link
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Old 04-16-2018, 06:11 PM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MiteyF View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickR View Post
In the case of the RAW kit, Iíve made a number of them as closed end. The first couple I made a mandrel, but figured out pretty quickly none is needed at all (if you are using a collet).


I've thought about this too. How exactly did you go about it? I've chucked up a spare cap in my collet chuck, and threaded on a whole pen to fix a finishing issue, but it was constantly spinning off thanks to the nice smooth threads.


Turn the blank round before drilling and leave extra on the ends for support using a live center. After drilling and gluing in the hardware you can work with it as one piece. I use a spare cap or male connector to work on the parts individually. If you keep some friction on the part it will keep the joint tight.
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Old 04-16-2018, 06:26 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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no special mandrel needed. A standard mandrel with the proper kit bushings can be used. Look at the closed end pen articles at http://www.RedRiverPens.com/articles
Do a good turn daily!
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Old 04-16-2018, 06:42 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickR View Post
Turn the blank round before drilling and leave extra on the ends for support using a live center. After drilling and gluing in the hardware you can work with it as one piece. I use a spare cap or male connector to work on the parts individually. If you keep some friction on the part it will keep the joint tight.
Hm. Why do you turn round first? I personally have never had much luck drilling on the lathe, press works much better for me. Not to mention my lack of chuck jaws that would hold a 1" square blank.

Virgil, you've got a dead link.
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Old 04-16-2018, 06:59 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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I turn round first so that I can drill it in a collet. Iím working on a small metal lathe but that shouldnít matter.
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