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Old 07-02-2018, 10:30 AM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Question Wipe on poly

I read a post yesterday that mentioned WOP for pen blanks. I have searched for it and haven't found it yet. How is it best applied and how long do you let each coat take to dry? Thanks.
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Old 07-02-2018, 10:41 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
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If you are using conventional solvent-based WOP, wipe it on using a bit of toilet paper or paper towel. Let it cure a few hours. Buff with fine steel wool or a gray scruffie pad, and then repeat until you get the desired effect - typically, 3-4 coats, but you can actually apply many more coats if you wish. After it cures fully (a couple of days), you can buff.

You can also use water-bourne poly (ie, floor finishing poly). You don't have to thin it, but it doesn't hurt to add just a bit of water. Drying is faster - typically, 30 minutes or thereabouts. You MUST buff lightly between applications because the water does raise grain. You can buff after it fully cures, but be careful - complete curing takes several days, and if you buff before it fully cures, you can damage the finish and have to sand everything off and start over.

The waterbourne version is probably a bit harder/tougher than the solvent version, and it is totally neutral in color while the solvent version is amber. The result is that by comparison, the waterbourne version almost looks blue. I suggest not using the waterbourne version on timbers that are very light in color.
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Old 07-02-2018, 10:52 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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On the recommendation/supplies I received from Bruce Robbins, I have the past year used a slow speed drying system in a cardboard box under a heat lamp. This has speeded up the cure time so I can reapply closer to a 2 hr wait. Humidity will also be a factor. This is with WOP.

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Old 07-02-2018, 11:10 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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I've used the above method and have also experimented with the dip method. Both work well, and I give the final coat 24 - 48 hours to cure. While it's not what you asked about, WTF also gives a nice finish in much less time.
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Old 07-02-2018, 11:16 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
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You might want to check out Wood Turners Finish from General Finishes. There is an extended thread on it here:

Simple non CA shiny finish

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Old 07-02-2018, 11:24 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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I have Minwax WOP Clear Satin. It says to use paint thinner to clean up. This should give you an idea what I propose to use. Dries in the 2-4 hours but I could rig up something to speed up the process.
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Old 07-02-2018, 11:37 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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You can also use Les Elm's process seen hehttp://content.penturners.org/librar...nwaxfinish.pdfre
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Old 07-02-2018, 11:45 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
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The photo Mark attached triggered a thought - - -

A WOP finish is generally built up using many thin coats. Another option is to use fewer coats, but where the individual coats are thicker. This approach is sometimes referred to as 'rotisserie' finishing. The basic procedure is to use a brush to apply a thick coat of full-strength polyurethane. The problem with applying a thick coat is the tendency for the finish to run. To counter that tendency, the piece must be rotated continuously, both while applying the finish, and for upwards of a hour after applying it. The vibration from continuously rotating the piece causes the finish to self-level, and after about an hour, it is pretty much set and you can stop the rotation. You do need to wait longer between applications - a thicker coat takes longer to cure. People who use this approach often wait as mush as 24 hours between coats, and to assure that the application is even, sand lightly between coats. But with this approach, you can build up a very thick coat of finish that will buff to a glass-like shine with about four applications.

Pepper mill turners often use rotisserie finishing, but there is no reason it couldn't be done with pens. Obviously, you need a means to rotate the pen for finishing - if your lathe can operate down in the 50-75 r/min range, you can just leave it on the lathe for finishing and that initial hour of curing. The downside is that this is an inefficient use of your lathe - having some kind of auxiliary rotating scheme frees up your lathe to turn the next pen while the last one is curing.
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Old 07-02-2018, 11:56 AM   #9 (permalink)
 
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I do exactly as Louie mentioned; after 45-60 minutes I turn the "rotisserie" off and let it sit in the warm box (certainly not hot, but you can feel some warmth on the mandrel). The second coat is usually at 2 hrs - If I don't forget it .
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Old 07-02-2018, 01:53 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Constant rotating is the same as I used for applying epoxy to fishing rod wraps. I need to make a new system as I tossed the stuff when I quit building rods 18 months ago. FWIW, if you see a microwave at the curb, grab it. Rod builders will fight over it. The turntable motors are about 4-6 rpm and some are reversible when you shut it off and start again. People toss the MW when all is needed is a new fuse.
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