How to make a faux Urushi/japanese lacquer finish - Page 3 - International Association of Penturners
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Old 03-08-2012, 11:41 PM   #21 (permalink)
 
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Urushi is on the US import and customs list of dangerous materials. I know that Ernest at Hakumin gets his directly from a supplier here in Japan...quite possibly one of the places I get mine from. So, it is possible. I don't ship it because I don't need the hassle should it get hung up in US customs.
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Old 03-08-2012, 11:42 PM   #22 (permalink)
 
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PT, I agree with you on the Japan Drier. I threw that out there as "a" solution.
Man that would have drove him crazy, if he never used it before. In the amount he will be applying. It always was a pain when you are dealing with pints,quarts and gallons!.
He shall have a very interesting learning experience a head of him.
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Old 04-19-2012, 09:09 PM   #23 (permalink)
 
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Default Replicating urushi

I've been playing around with several different methods and even though I still have to refine the process.....I think I'm on to something
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Old 04-19-2012, 09:48 PM   #24 (permalink)
 
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Not bad....but it's looking quite deliberate and hurried. Urushi is neither.

I guess it depends what you do with it after this point but I would say thin layers of paint...sand back till the highspots just barely show and repeat many times until all the low spots are level with the red. Togidashi is a very delicate and time consuming process.

That said.... It's great that you are going hard on this. Awesome enthusiasm.
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Old 04-19-2012, 10:00 PM   #25 (permalink)
 
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Not bad....but it's looking quite deliberate and hurried. Urushi is neither.

I guess it depends what you do with it after this point but I would say thin layers of paint...sand back till the highspots just barely show and repeat many times until all the low spots are level with the red. Togidashi is a very delicate and time consuming process.

That said.... It's great that you are going hard on this. Awesome enthusiasm.
I agree. I have a LONG ways to go but the purpose was to narrow down the right material and methods that would get me in the ballpark lol. In all honesty this is my 15th attempt to get the method somewhat close but I'm making progress. (The blank in the picture took several days to make)

The pen is actually smooth but I'm going to be working on finessing the bump layer and highlight layer so it can replicate the smooth and natural effect/figure of true shibo urushi. But I'm happy with being able to apply the methods with different materials. (Hardest part is finding materials that work with one another )

Thanks for the support!

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Old 04-20-2012, 12:00 AM   #26 (permalink)
 
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Ooops.....sorry, In that pic the red looks like it is flaking off and not smooth.

15 attempts ....that's pretty good. You'd probably be looking at 15 attempts with real urushi before getting it close and it wouldn't be two days...more like two months between attempts. To do this without urushi or Cashew would have me scratching my head. Very cool and looking forward to seeing #16,,,17...18...and...
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Old 04-20-2012, 07:48 AM   #27 (permalink)
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I personally don't think you will be able to replicate Urushi easily outside of lacquer itself. If it could be done, it probably would have been done. I may be a little too particular, but that is my background from Japan. They are very disciplined in this area. Western minds want to speed up the process!

"Japan dryers" are metalic additives (a thinner of sorts) that go into US/Euro lacquers that help it cure at a different rate and then give supposedly similar properties of Japanese lacquer. The Urushi effect takes place with layers and layers and each being "cured" before adding the other layers. Drying to touch and even light sanding takes 2 to 4 hours, but real "curing" takes days to months between layers.
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Old 04-27-2012, 10:06 PM   #28 (permalink)
 
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Default #16 making progress

AND here's #16. I have to say this is the most fun I've had making blanks. I really enjoy the whole process and the fun of seeing the design evolve. Comments and critiques are welcome.
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Old 04-27-2012, 10:37 PM   #29 (permalink)
 
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It appears you are on your way, and as the others have said there is a different standard on time and the steps involved. Looking good you are doing nice work.
As with the cinnabar work the real is time consuming each layer is painted and cured then another layer added to the wood or enameled brass base.


A real vase can have upwards of 300 + layers before carving starts.


poured, pressed and forced cured. Solid material drilled out and the a disk of brass glued on. As you can see the dull muddled faux carving's compared to the one above.
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Old 04-30-2012, 02:10 AM   #30 (permalink)
 
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AND here's #16. I have to say this is the most fun I've had making blanks. I really enjoy the whole process and the fun of seeing the design evolve. Comments and critiques are welcome.
Hey, #16 is looking pretty good. Different than urushi but in a good way. I would like to see one of these finished.
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