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Old 06-18-2017, 08:10 AM   #21 (permalink)
 
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Peppercorn tree, fence, #57 ?

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OK so, what made you think that the Peppercorn tree, an invasive species in Australia, is capable of doing such a thing...?

Are you sure...? you still have another guess.

PS: what is happening with everybody else...??? no one wants to play..?

Cheers
George
Well the bark matches up and after research the tree is actually capable of this and finally I'm not one who's going to disagree with a tree expert like yourself 😉 so rightly or wrongly I think I'll stick with my answer.

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Well, I'm glad you are happy with your second guess, as for the "tree expert" I know a little, however, far from being an expert but, thank you...!

Cheers
George
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Old 06-18-2017, 08:31 AM   #22 (permalink)
 
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She-Bull Oak (#14) eating a fence
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Old 06-18-2017, 02:41 PM   #23 (permalink)
 
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I'll try one shot.

Eucalyptus, fence and No. While, you do have the Dura, Beakpod, White Ironbark and the Peninsularis listed, I don't think this particular species is on your list.

I doubt this is right, but it's fun to try.
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Old 06-18-2017, 11:39 PM   #24 (permalink)
 
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I think DJBPenmaker may be right with Peppercorn #57 as George did not say he was wrong...he challenged why he thought it was Peppercorn. That is not an unusual move by George to let others still play.
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Old 06-18-2017, 11:52 PM   #25 (permalink)
 
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She-Bull Oak (#14) eating a fence
G'day mate,

Not a good choice, why...? because that wood is pretty much a slow growing tree that doesn't have what we know as sapwood, the whole thing is heartwood and then the bark that is thin and roughly "scaled", in this case, if planted too close to a metal/wood/etc. structure, the tree would grow pushing against that structure as it grows, bend and continue up. Only trees that are super fast growing with lots of soft juicy sapwood are capable of growing over things...!

PS: You are correct mate, I like to give everybody a chance to play, regardless...!

Cheers
George
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Old 06-18-2017, 11:56 PM   #26 (permalink)
 
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I'll try one shot.

Eucalyptus, fence and No. While, you do have the Dura, Beakpod, White Ironbark and the Peninsularis listed, I don't think this particular species is on your list.

I doubt this is right, but it's fun to try.
Hi,

You've got the fence right but the rest is incorrect, including the fact that, the tree species in question is indeed listed on my Timber List...!

Cheers
George
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Old 06-19-2017, 02:41 AM   #27 (permalink)
 
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Olive #21 eating the garden gate
Hahahah, no your answer is incorrect but let me tell you something, there are no other tree species in Australia with as much fence wire inside of them as the Olive trees, why...? because in the old days our European colonizers started by planting Olive trees as fence boundaries and later, wire fences were erected between these trees as if they were fence posts and off-course, after many years, the wires wrapped around the trees trunks started to become embedded in the trees were only the wires coming out of it are/were visible.

I can still today find many of these Olive trees with wires coming out of them and if they were spikes

Cheers
George
Well George , in my part of Alberta , it is the aspen poplar trees that eat the fence wire and the staples . Of course , as farmers we know that a living post will outlast a dead one , and doesn`t have to be treated with bluestone to extend its life , so they were frequently utilized when a fence had to run through a patch of brush . I doubt they were commonly planted next to a house fence here though , because they sucker like crazy .
. Don`t think you have the aspen in Australia , but I know you`ve cut a lot of the white and black ones , as is evidenced by it appearing early on your list as number 10 .
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Old 06-19-2017, 07:21 AM   #28 (permalink)
 
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Okay I will officially say
Fence #10 Poplar.

I say Poplar because the bark looks like it, and I remember as a kid in Upstate NY those things were trash trees. I did a science experiment as a kid if I would take a limb of it and plant it, if it would grow. I already knew the answer, because we would use them for stakes when we planted other trees.
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Old 06-19-2017, 07:26 AM   #29 (permalink)
 
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Strangler fig
#62
Fence
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Old 06-19-2017, 07:45 AM   #30 (permalink)
 
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Okay I will officially say
Fence #10 Poplar.

I say Poplar because the bark looks like it, and I remember as a kid in Upstate NY those things were trash trees. I did a science experiment as a kid if I would take a limb of it and plant it, if it would grow. I already knew the answer, because we would use them for stakes when we planted other trees.
Wrong tree species, sorry.

As an intrusive type tree species, Poplar trees can grow from any off-cuts branches the one thing they can not do without in plenty of water, if the ground is dry, they won't survive long.

Cheers
George
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