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Old 08-27-2007, 05:37 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default View Different Sharpening Jig Concepts

As a newbie buying/building my penturning equipment, I want to make my own grinding jig(s). As one expert turner remarked, "once you understand the principle build a jig to make it work". I followed that advice and started planning the jig. First I Google'd some pix of Gouge Jigs.

Whoa! There are a _Bunch_ of different ways to approach the design. ALL of them look excellent. I'm not sure which type is best for me since I don't plan on selling my stuff. Just a hobby for a retired guy.

Anyway here are some pix. Hope they are of some help.

































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Old 08-27-2007, 05:53 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Might I recommend you visit your local woodworking supplier and look at the various jigs for the Tormek and/or the Jet systems. I don't use the Wolverine myself, but from what I read here it is a very popular system in use by many IAP members.

I don't like the design of the jigs that could allow the end of the handle to 'swivel' left and/or right. That would change the angle of the edge a good bi and you would never be able to get a consistent edge. Those jigs with a 'pocket' for the end of the tool handle make far more sense to me.

The use of a sander seems like it would cause a quick generation of heat in the steel. Bad thing!

I push the use of the Tormek machine and cannot say enough about the quality and reproducible results one is capable of getting with it's use. Expensive yes, but definitely worth it. The Jet is a good 'copy', but many folks here seem to like to to use the Tormek jigs with it as they are definitely better and more versatile jigs.

Go to Woodcraft or Rockler and put your hands on these things and go so far as to ask for a demonstration. Take a dull tool and let them show you the difference between sharp and "scary sharp!" Talk with other customers in the store ... research, research, research. Ask lots of questions. [:D]
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:42 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
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This looks like a great place to use for reference - I'll add my jig to this mix, too. Maybe we can turn this thread into the "Check here and find what works best for you" answer to the usual sharpening questions :D

Here's mine:

http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_arm-bracket.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_arm-pocket.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_arm.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_bowl-center.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_bowl-left.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_bowl-right.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_fingernail-left.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_fingernail-right.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_pocket-closeup.jpg
http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/albums/userpics/10007/normal_roughing.jpg

For more info and larger pics:

http://sacramentoareawoodworkers.com/album/thumbnails.php?album=14

This could turn into quite a stockpile of reference info! :)
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:47 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Fred-erick, Thanks for the advice. I'm always looking for an excuse to visit Rockler's. At the moment $$$ are the issue (retired guy) but I'll put the Tormek on my Christmas list.
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Old 08-27-2007, 09:05 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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<br />
I bought this setup a while ago from ?, but I know Penn State carries it now. It works great for me. It has a v-block style holder for gouges so your angle is set all you have to do is rotate the tool. And it has a flat holder for scrapers or skews with a slot to just move the guide left and right to sharpen it. The only drawback is when your grinding wheel changes sizes obviously so does the angle, but I just match up the angle already ground on the tool.
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Old 08-28-2007, 12:41 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Ok, let's look at all the pictures you posted (numbered versions below):

Pictures 2-4, and 13 are different versions of the same thing: a thumbnail gouge sharpener.

Pictures 1, 6, 15, 16 are all different versions of the same thing: an arm rest for sharpening things with a fixed angle. Although 16 is a home-brew for sharpening on a belt sander rather than a wheel.

Pictures 7, 9, 11, and 12 are all different versions of the same thing: an arm with fixed base for sharpening spindle gouges. Although item 12 also has an offset to the fixed base for sharpening skews.

Item 10-13 are various pieces of the Wolverine system (that combines all of the above), some showing it in use.

Item 5 is the lower arm of item 6.

Item 8 is who knows what?

So, everything you have shown are bits and pieces of various systems to be used with a 3rd-party vertical grinding wheel (preferably of large diameter and slow speed (and even more so, wet)) to be able to sharpen most of your woodworking tools. Because they are all used for different kinds of tools it isn't an either/or situation and therefore isn't as complicated as you think.

The real "confusion" comes from what sharpening "wheel" to use. I think it is safe to say that the consensus is that a large diameter, wet wheel is your best choice for ease and keeping your tools tempered. You can (and I do) use my sanding disk to sharpen many of your tools but you have to be VERY careful to not overheat the tool and it is very tough to get sharpening jigs to work on it (as demonstrated by picture 16 which is quite a concoction and will only work for one kinda tool).

If you are going to go with a vertical wheel setup, in general you want a extendable arm so you can adjust the length so that the angle of your tool grind matches up with the wheel. 7, 9-12 all show various versions including what looks like a home made one.

You also want something that will let you do the complex grind of the fingernail gouges: 2-4 and 13. This will sit into the "nook" on your extendable arm and will let you easily replicate the complex curves every time.

Lastly you want the simple flat fixed plate to do chisels and simple tools like roughing gouges: 1, 6, and 15. It just needs to be very sturdy.

All of the above can be home made for a lot less than purchasing complete systems but the complete system from someone like Wolverine makes it really easy.

Now, if you buy a Jet or Tormek rather than a simple grinding wheel system, then none of what you are seeing will work but there are equivalent jigs for those systems. The benefit to the Jet and Tormek are the large wheel so your tools don't end up very concave; slow turning and wet so the tool stays cool. Is it worth the money? I'm arguing with myself about that right now. I have a 6" grinder that proved to be way to small and too fast the first time I used it so I bought a 2-speed 8" grinder and new wheels and a wolverine system. It works well for some of the tools but for some I have gone to my sanding disk to get the edges I need and jigs for that. Hmmmmm I bet I coulda bought the Jet for all the money I've spent on other (arguably lesser) systems.

I hope that helps!
GK



Quote:
Originally posted by palmermethod
<br />As a newbie buying/building my penturning equipment, I want to make my own grinding jig(s). As one expert turner remarked, "once you understand the principle build a jig to make it work". I followed that advice and started planning the jig. First I Google'd some pix of Gouge Jigs.

Whoa! There are a _Bunch_ of different ways to approach the design. ALL of them look excellent. I'm not sure which type is best for me since I don't plan on selling my stuff. Just a hobby for a retired guy.

Anyway here are some pix. Hope they are of some help.


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


11


12


13


14


15


16
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Old 09-12-2007, 08:26 PM   #7 (permalink)
 
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This is what I ended up using.

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Old 09-14-2007, 12:24 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by palmermethod
<br />This is what I ended up using.

I need to warn about the polishing wheels here. Unless the rotation of the grinder is reversed or you polish your tool edges UPSIDE DOWN, you risk very serious consequences. As pointed out to me by another user. The polishing wheels are MDF and will tear your arm off if you dig an edge into the wheel. I set this up _temporarily_ until I get something better, because I was anxious to start turning.
Thanks - "It's only a Flesh Wound"
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Old 09-14-2007, 03:13 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Being overly anxious around grinders is definitely the way to really destroy your expensive tools, not to mention the possibility of getting hurt rather badly.

A grinder IMHO turns wayyyyyyy to fast to be safely used to sharpen wood turning tools. I highly recommend that you use this one for the lawn mower blades and such, and get one that is lower turning and even water cooled to sharpen your tools.

You will be safer, your tools will last longer, and life in general will be better. It sure beats getting hurt and NOT being able to do anything till you heal up! [:D]
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