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Old 07-29-2007, 05:41 AM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Bandsaw/Antler

If you've cut any amount of antler than,like me,you've probably ruined a bandsaw blade when it "catches" and bends the blade. Try a metal cutting blade. Picked one up from Lowes($10) and WOW what a difference!! Now I use it for everything pen related.PR,acrylic,brass tubes,cartridges,stabilized wood blanks,regular wood blanks,you get the idea. The only time I take it off is for flat work.Try it. I think you'll like it!
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Old 07-29-2007, 12:51 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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I can't imagine why you would experience 'catch' with antler. It cuts no different than any other material. You just may have needed a new blade regardless of material involved.
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Old 07-30-2007, 09:12 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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When cutting pieces off a rack it's not always possible to keep the piece fully supported. I guess it's not so much the material as it is the way you have to go about cutting it.Judging from the response I'm the only one with this problem or nobody is coppin' to it.
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Old 07-30-2007, 09:22 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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I also use a steel blade to cut antler. I bring it in and cut it at work on an 'industrial'. I also found it more difficult to cut with a wood cutting blade JMO.

-Peter-[:)]
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Old 07-30-2007, 09:39 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
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Do you have the right tension on your blade? I have been using the same blade on my delta for months cutting antler and I've never had that problem.
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Old 07-30-2007, 09:46 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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I've always used the normal wood cutting blade on my little 9" Ryobi.. never had a problem with cutting antler. I cut all of my acrylic and antlers on the Ryobi... saving the Delta for just wood.

I do make sure that the antler has some support when I cut it.. sometimes if it is particularly curved I might lay a piece of scrap under it for support.

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Old 07-30-2007, 10:38 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by rherrell
<br />When cutting pieces off a rack it's not always possible to keep the piece fully supported. I guess it's not so much the material as it is the way you have to go about cutting it.Judging from the response I'm the only one with this problem or nobody is coppin' to it.
How many teeth per inch does your blade have? I have found that, even with wood, a 3tpi blade can catch when feeding it wood only about 1" thick. My next resaw blade will be a four tooth.
For general cutting, I prefer a 6 tpi blade.
On an irregular item, like an antler rack, you may have to suffer some waste to get support. Cut a big section (with support) then the shorter blank lengths. If your present technique is responsible for catches, you have a dangerous condition [:0] and you should find another way, even if it means doing with a hacksaw by hand.
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Old 07-30-2007, 12:06 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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[quote]Originally posted by Rifleman1776
<br />
Quote:
[How many teeth per inch does your blade have? I have found that, even with wood, a 3tpi blade can catch when feeding it wood only about 1" thick. My next resaw blade will be a four tooth.
For general cutting, I prefer a 6 tpi blade.
Bingo!

The right number of teeth-per-inch (tpi) is dependent on the thickness of the material. If the teeth alternate in pitch, then you need a minimum of three teeth in the stock while cutting. For example, a 3tpi blade should be used only for cutting pieces at least 1" thick; a 4tpi blade would be for 3/4" minimum; a 6tpi for 1/2" or larger. This is so the teeth are always cutting evenly on both sides of the blade. If the teeth do not alternate (e.g., if there are rakers or if the teeth are set in a wave pattern), then you need more teeth in the stock when cutting (that is, even more tpi).

If your stock is too thin for your tpi, then at best, you will have a lower quality cut. You will feel more chatter while cutting. You'll have a much greater chance of catching or kickback.

I once tried to cut a piece of antler with a 3tpi blade. I was lazy and didn't want to bother changing the band for just a couple of cuts. Well, instead of cutting, the blade grabbed the antler, ripped it out of my hands, broke the table insert, and flung all the pieces 20 ft. across the shop. I found the antler, put a new insert in the table, and tried again with a firmer grip. The saw did the same thing, except this time the antler gouged and bruised my hands in several places when it wrenched free.

Learn from my mistake. Use a fine-tooth blade when cutting irregularly shaped (like antler) or thin stock.

Sincerely,
Eric
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Old 07-30-2007, 01:45 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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The blade I was using was 1/4"X 4TPI.I agree with you about the TPI. The metal blade has alot, maybe 16 or 18.
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Old 07-30-2007, 01:53 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Proper support is the answer. Make sure the bow where the blade is cutting is always in contact with the table. If not possible, then add a block of wood where it can seat while being cut and not let it (the cut line) "float".

More TPI will help too but using 3 tpi doesn't bother me.
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