Why Blanks Go "BOOM" - Page 3 - International Association of Penturners
     International Association of Penturners
Pens for Service Members
 
Support The IAP

Go Back   International Association of Penturners > Community Forums > Blank Making > Segmenting
  Forgot Password
Register FAQ Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Logged on members can hide ads!

Welcome to penturners.org!

You've found the home of The International Association of Penturners. You are currently viewing our site as a guest, which gives you limited access to view discussions, photos, and library articles.

Consider joining our community today. You'll have full access to all of our content, be able to enter our contests, find local chapters near you, and post your questions and share your experience with our members all over the world.

Membership is completely free!!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-07-2013, 11:13 AM   #21 (permalink)
 
Carl Fisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Fort Mill, South Carolina
Photos: 10

Default

I agree with Ed. If you can't pay attention to what the blank and/or tool is telling you during your turning process, take a step away and regroup. Knock on wood, of the few blow ups I've ever had, looking back they all gave me plenty of warning that I was putting too much stress on the cut or that some other attention was needed on the blank to solidify it.

For those REALLY sensitive blanks, a layer of gauze and thin CA when drilling is a good option along with frequent time out for a thin ca flood while turning.

Oh yeah, and as someone else already mentioned, stay far away from brad point bits when drilling mixed-media or even in my personal experience any acrylics. They are good on wood and wood only from my point of view, everything else gets a standard ground bit.
__________________

Last edited by Carl Fisher; 05-07-2013 at 11:15 AM.
Carl Fisher is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-07-2013, 11:21 AM   #22 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Melissa, Texas
Posts: 281
Photos: 0

Default

A very good thread. It would be good reading for newbies.

ZIP-IT!
__________________
For those that have fought for it, life has a certain flavor the protected will never know.
http://www.KurfmanCustomPens.com
Sawdust46 is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-07-2013, 11:28 AM   #23 (permalink)
 
BSea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Little Rock, Arkansas
Posts: 4,554
Photos: 40

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BURLMAN View Post
One thing I do when drilling Snakewood is to freeze my drill bits before drilling. Seems to help out. This is particularly useful if you have several of the same size drill bit. Freeze them all and swap out often. When changing bits, insert a frozen tube in the drilled hole to cool it back down.
1st off, let me say that I've never done this, so I'm not speaking from experience. But I'm wondering if the sudden change in temp (going from very hot to very cold) might cause a sudden movement in the wood/resin and cause it to crack. Kind of like putting an ice cube in a hot glass can sometimes cause the glass to break.

EDIT: I agree with Ed and Carl. Most of the times I've had blowouts, I had some warnings that either I ignored, or realized after the fact. When in doubt, slow down, or stop completely, and take a break.
__________________
Bob

Central Arkansas IAP Chapter Member

Last edited by BSea; 05-07-2013 at 11:31 AM.
BSea is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Advertisement
Old 05-07-2013, 06:52 PM   #24 (permalink)
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 377
Photos: 0

Default

If you have a blank that is made up of many small parts, with many metal and non metal inserts, try gluing thin plywood strip to the four sides before you drill the blank. These will give the blank a lot of support, holding all the parts together while drilling. Plywood turns away very easily on the lathe. I did this on a blank that had 20 plus different parts and it worked perfectly. The first blank made at the same time, without the extra exterior reinforcement, failed twice in drilling. Scrap plywood is cheap and lends a lot of extra strength.
Likes: (1)
jfoh is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-07-2013, 09:01 PM   #25 (permalink)
 
jttheclockman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: NJ, USA.
Photos: 83

Default

I have used popsicle sticks too. Now I use the mixing sticks you get at the craft stores.
__________________
John T.
Likes: (1)
jttheclockman is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-08-2013, 08:23 AM   #26 (permalink)
 
randyrls's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Harrisburg, PA 17112
Posts: 3,913
Photos: 61

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by airborne_r6 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by randyrls View Post
Add to the Heat section; When drilling multi-part blanks, the blank must be supported from the end of the blank. No matter how you drill blanks, having the blank only clamped form the sides will break the glue joint.
...
I'm not sure if I understand what you mean by supporting the end of the blank while drilling. Can you elaborate?
Wayne; I use a Support Block under the blank for the drill bit to press against. If you drill on the lathe, you can insert a block between the jaws. A picture is worth a thousand words.
__________________
Randy S.
~~~~ Add Your Postal Code and Country to the UserCP ~~~~~

I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good, therefore, that I can do or any kindness I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it for I shall not pass this way again. -- Stephen Grellet
randyrls is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-08-2013, 09:47 AM   #27 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Photos: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by randyrls View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by airborne_r6 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by randyrls View Post
Add to the Heat section; When drilling multi-part blanks, the blank must be supported from the end of the blank. No matter how you drill blanks, having the blank only clamped form the sides will break the glue joint.
...
I'm not sure if I understand what you mean by supporting the end of the blank while drilling. Can you elaborate?
Wayne; I use a Support Block under the blank for the drill bit to press against. If you drill on the lathe, you can insert a block between the jaws. A picture is worth a thousand words.
Perfect, thank you. I do it on the drill press but hadn't thought of doing it on the lathe.
airborne_r6 is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-08-2013, 09:51 AM   #28 (permalink)
 
mikespenturningz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Claremont NH
Posts: 4,316
Photos: 72

Default

I am not sure how I would accomplish this on a lathe either. I suppose you could glue one on then part it off afterward? Makes great sense on the drill press.
__________________
Mike S.
Claremont, NH
MikesPenTurningZ on Etsy

Psalm 19:14
Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my strength, and my redeemer.
mikespenturningz is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-12-2013, 08:34 AM   #29 (permalink)
 
Roy_Quast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hockley, Texas, USA.
Posts: 105
Photos: 24

Default

A few years ago I put together a tutorial for a pen that I made that I think will help new segmentors with the problem of blow-ups. Since I have started using this method, I have not blown up any more blanks. If you follow the tutorial, you might not ever blow up another blank! I have posted this link before but it was years ago and most people don't look that far back. Hope you enjoy it. Here's the link: Brass & Ebony II - A Penturner's Paradise
__________________
If you don't enjoy what you are doing... that's when it becomes work.
Roy_Quast is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 05-13-2013, 05:46 AM   #30 (permalink)
 
jttheclockman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: NJ, USA.
Photos: 83

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roy_Quast View Post
A few years ago I put together a tutorial for a pen that I made that I think will help new segmentors with the problem of blow-ups. Since I have started using this method, I have not blown up any more blanks. If you follow the tutorial, you might not ever blow up another blank! I have posted this link before but it was years ago and most people don't look that far back. Hope you enjoy it. Here's the link: Brass & Ebony II - A Penturner's Paradise


Roy I do remember those pens and they still have not been matched in excellence and thought process. As far as gluing the extra pieces to the sides has been talked about by many here before and the use of sandpaper is also a good idea if need be. Those pens are some of the finest segmenting i have ever seen presented. There are a couple others out there but these rank very high.

Have you been doing anything else exciting as this and if so where can we see it?? Thanks for the reminder.
__________________
John T.
jttheclockman is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Related Content
Logged on members can hide ads
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:27 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0

Content Copyright © 2003-2018 by Penturners.org, LLC; All Rights Reserved
Terms Of Service   Acceptable Use Policy