Ryobi Flooring Saw - Page 2 - International Association of Penturners
     International Association of Penturners
Pens for Service Members
 
Support The IAP

Go Back   International Association of Penturners > Community Forums > Blank Making > Segmenting
  Forgot Password
Register FAQ Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Logged on members can hide ads!

Welcome to penturners.org!

You've found the home of The International Association of Penturners. You are currently viewing our site as a guest, which gives you limited access to view discussions, photos, and library articles.

Consider joining our community today. You'll have full access to all of our content, be able to enter our contests, find local chapters near you, and post your questions and share your experience with our members all over the world.

Membership is completely free!!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-08-2017, 11:54 AM   #11 (permalink)
 
chartle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Pgh, PA
Posts: 821
Photos: 0

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by eharri446 View Post
Dogcatcher,

Take a look at the Ryobi 18V miter saw. I have one that I use for cutting my blanks to length and with a 60 tooth blade the cuts a smooth as glass. If you came up with a way to keep the thin pieces from falling through the base such as a small tube hooked to a shopvac or a piece of double sided tape sticking to the end of a dowel rod, then you should be able to cut segments with no problem.

The cost of the saw is $100.00 with another $15 or so for the 60 tooth blade and the whole saw only weighs 17 pounds.
Well it would work for me since I don't cut all teh way thru the blank to keep things together.
__________________
Cliff
chartle is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 10-08-2017, 01:50 PM   #12 (permalink)
 
KenV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Juneau, Alaska.
Photos: 0

Default

I have the Skill flooring saw. It does not have clearance (looks like by design) for stock over 1/2_ inch thick.

Sounds like a project to reinvent the Radial Arm Saw.
__________________
Ken Vaughan
Old Apprentice Machinist - Back in Alaska
KenV is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 10-09-2017, 01:31 AM   #13 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: TX, NM or on the road
Posts: 1,218
Photos: 0

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KenV View Post
I have the Skill flooring saw. It does not have clearance (looks like by design) for stock over 1/2_ inch thick.

Sounds like a project to reinvent the Radial Arm Saw.
That is what I am going for, a radial arm saw that works backward. Instead of pulling it towards you, the circular saw will ride on rails going away from the operator. Not really planning on segmenting pen blanks. They will be more of the size of bottle stoppers and pepper mill size. 1.5 square is the size I am aiming at. I admire the ones that do pen blanks, but with my disabilities, physical and eyesight, I know better than to tackle the small stuff.
dogcatcher is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Advertisement
Old 10-09-2017, 10:09 AM   #14 (permalink)
Member Liaison
 
leehljp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Tunica, MS,
Posts: 5,361
Photos: 46

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogcatcher View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenV View Post
I have the Skill flooring saw. It does not have clearance (looks like by design) for stock over 1/2_ inch thick.

Sounds like a project to reinvent the Radial Arm Saw.
That is what I am going for, a radial arm saw that works backward. Instead of pulling it towards you, the circular saw will ride on rails going away from the operator. Not really planning on segmenting pen blanks. They will be more of the size of bottle stoppers and pepper mill size. 1.5 square is the size I am aiming at. I admire the ones that do pen blanks, but with my disabilities, physical and eyesight, I know better than to tackle the small stuff.
The problem with it going backwards is that the blade of the saw is on the UPSWING and will lift the wood unless it is securely clamped down firmly.

A sliding miter saw is like a backwards radial arm saw with less reach. A 12 inch SCMS (or CSMS) will give you a cross cut of about 12 inches, but you need to look at the specific specs of each model. Good quality Compound SLIDING Miter Saws will run in the neighborhood of $400 and more, but some can be had cheaper.
__________________
Hank Lee

Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

Last edited by leehljp; 10-09-2017 at 10:15 AM.
leehljp is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 10-09-2017, 12:05 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: TX, NM or on the road
Posts: 1,218
Photos: 0

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by leehljp View Post
The problem with it going backwards is that the blade of the saw is on the UPSWING and will lift the wood unless it is securely clamped down firmly.
The blade will be in the correct rotation mode. The backward part I referred to is the saw will be pushed away from the operator, instead of like on a radial arm saw where the blade is pulled towards the operator.

In my opinion the hold down clamps you mentioned are a necessity, not an option. Toggle clamps are cheap compared to an emergency room visit trying hold those little pieces by hand.
Likes: (1)
dogcatcher is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 10-09-2017, 12:53 PM   #16 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Saskatoon SK., Canada.
Posts: 2,443
Photos: 1

Default

dogcatcher you pretty much know what you want to do and achieve so likely will accomplish it.

I'll toss another idea at you to adapt and build to your need. There was a saw that was sold for construction work a couple three decades ago when miter saws were getting a toe hold on construction sites and before the sliders were out. I can't remember who made them, maybe someone else here does, Skill, Delta, etc., not any of the Japanese companies. It had a pair of guide tubes mounted on a protractor base with the circular type saw sliding between. It was big enough to cut 2 x 12s at an angle and had it's own built in folding stand. In use it was pushed through the wood as you want to do. Wood pick up wasn't a problem since it was for framing and trim lumber.
__________________
Pete
Proud to be the support staff and enabler of Marla Christensen.
Curly is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Old 10-09-2017, 02:09 PM   #17 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: TX, NM or on the road
Posts: 1,218
Photos: 0

Default

I had one, but I have not thought of that thing in years. I gave it away to my neighbor, I believe he may still have it. Maybe that is where I got this idea from.
Likes: (1)
dogcatcher is offline   Reply With Quote Top
Related Content
Logged on members can hide ads
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:49 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0

Content Copyright © 2003-2016 by Penturners.org, LLC; All Rights Reserved
Terms Of Service   Acceptable Use Policy