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Old 10-07-2017, 06:58 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Ryobi Flooring Saw

Has anyone ever tried to cut segments with a flooring saw like the Ryobi or Skilsaw flooring saw? https://youtu.be/jJa001-QvHQ

I watched a guy today lay some flooring, he had a similar rig, except it was homemade using a circular saw. The saw was mounted on 2 guides above the wood to be cut, like the Ryobi the saw moved over the wood as it cut. He marked the angles and used the toggle clamps to hold the flooring in place while he cut.

It was basically a moveable upside down mini table saw sliding over the wood, a reverse of a table saw slide. Like this one. https://youtu.be/Rii-N5V9GbA

This is my theory, 2 rails with the saw mounted above the cutting area. Square the saw to the starting edge and use premade angle jigs to align the cuts. The cost would be a quarter sheet of MDF, the 2 rails and sliding blocks, a circular saw, and miscellaneous hardware. Cost would be less tha a $100, it would take up a small space and make segmenting available to just about everyone.
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Old 10-07-2017, 07:21 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Why not just build a homemade table saw with a circular saw mounted underneath a table made of plywood?

Cut a few dadoes into the plywood and make a sliding table.
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Old 10-07-2017, 09:32 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
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My circular saw, I use it for other things, would usually be detached. This jig would only be about 3" high, and 12" square, it will easily fit out of the way on a shelf when not in use. The blade would be controlled not by a switch, but my hand, keeping it out of the way. Converting the circular saw to a table saw would mean a 12"x12"x12" box, more space will be utilized. The sled for the table saw would take up almost as much space as the jig.

Last but most important, the sliding circular saw jig will take up less space when we travel. It will also be easier for me to load and unload. I am disabled, anything I have to move usually lands up on the seat of my walker going from the house to the car at both places.
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Old 10-08-2017, 01:24 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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It might. Right off, you would have to change/make a zero clearance insert to keep cut parts from zinging out somewhere in the shop and to make clean cuts.
Then you probably need a table/workbench to set it on.
Beyond that, it might work ok. I question the ability to get accurate angles on a consistent basis.
I have seen segments cut on much less, and the segmented turnings have come out great.
Can't beat a good sled on a table saw.
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Old 10-08-2017, 02:17 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
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1. Zero clearance insert. The saw would be like a compound miter saw moving on a straight track. No insert can be made or needed.

2. Table, that is the least of the problems, I have plenty of room on my assembly workbench.

3. Using precut angles, like the Seg Easy set up. The difference between this and a table saw is the saw will do the moving. Mount the saw on rails like CNC routers use, that way it is always cutting constant in a line. Toggle clamps on both ends to hold the piece of wood being cut.

I understand the table saw, it is a case that physically I can no longer move it from the shelf to my work bench. This system is same, except the saw moves across the sled instead of the sled moving across the saw. The saw would be mounted to a similar set lie this. 8mm Linear Rail Shaft Optical Axis Guide Rod W/ Bearing Block Support 20/30/50cm | eBay
I figure 2 steel rods, one on each side with 2 nylon bearing supports on each to mount the saw on.
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Old 10-08-2017, 07:16 AM   #6 (permalink)
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1. I am fairly sure the Ryobi model has been discontinued.

2. The flooring saw like that would be dangerous on small blanks beyond simple blank cutting from a board. Segmenting would be dangerous as the hold down clamps would be needed on both sides right next to the blade.

3. That does look good for making blanks out of whole boards though. . . a thought - since most blanks are 3/4 inch, what is the capacity of the flooring saws? most flooring is 1/2 inch thick or less.
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Old 10-08-2017, 07:43 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Dogcatcher,

Take a look at the Ryobi 18V miter saw. I have one that I use for cutting my blanks to length and with a 60 tooth blade the cuts a smooth as glass. If you came up with a way to keep the thin pieces from falling through the base such as a small tube hooked to a shopvac or a piece of double sided tape sticking to the end of a dowel rod, then you should be able to cut segments with no problem.

The cost of the saw is $100.00 with another $15 or so for the 60 tooth blade and the whole saw only weighs 17 pounds.
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Old 10-08-2017, 12:01 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Another way of doing the same would be with a track saw. One section of track with something like a Kreg guide or either the regular or mini Grizzly track saws (you'll have to look them up as they don't link right for me) should be enough. You only need to mount them to a shallow box to put the wood under.
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Old 10-08-2017, 12:40 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eharri446 View Post
Dogcatcher,

Take a look at the Ryobi 18V miter saw. I have one that I use for cutting my blanks to length and with a 60 tooth blade the cuts a smooth as glass. If you came up with a way to keep the thin pieces from falling through the base such as a small tube hooked to a shopvac or a piece of double sided tape sticking to the end of a dowel rod, then you should be able to cut segments with no problem.

The cost of the saw is $100.00 with another $15 or so for the 60 tooth blade and the whole saw only weighs 17 pounds.
I tried the miter saw, even built the fancy table that sat on the miter saw using I believe info from Malcom Tibbits. It worked okay, but the safety factor, it was always looking like an accident waiting to happen, I have over 50 years of woodworking and all 10 fingers, I plan on keeping them.
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Old 10-08-2017, 12:43 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curly View Post
Another way of doing the same would be with a track saw. One section of track with something like a Kreg guide or either the regular or mini Grizzly track saws (you'll have to look them up as they don't link right for me) should be enough. You only need to mount them to a shallow box to put the wood under.
Having a track with the saw above the wood is what I am thinking about doing, Toggle clamps on both sides of the cut. Using premade angle guides and a secure saw track that is dead on.
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