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Old 04-08-2013, 11:57 PM   #11 (permalink)
 
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Well, I think that proves that a slimline is certainly acceptable for this kind of segmenting. Nothing at all wrong with turning slimlines. I did 3 or 4 slimlines when I started turning, then quickly moved to the larger pens. But about a year ago, I started doing them again. Not all the time, but enough to know that they can be fun and really good looking. And like you said, they are really great to practice new ideas or skills.

Good Job!!
If you keep the blank that fat then sure. Not for my taste on that look. Just my opinion
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:43 PM   #12 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by BSea View Post
Well, I think that proves that a slimline is certainly acceptable for this kind of segmenting. Nothing at all wrong with turning slimlines. I did 3 or 4 slimlines when I started turning, then quickly moved to the larger pens. But about a year ago, I started doing them again. Not all the time, but enough to know that they can be fun and really good looking. And like you said, they are really great to practice new ideas or skills.

Good Job!!
If you keep the blank that fat then sure. Not for my taste on that look. Just my opinion
Hi John... I'm just curious and I value your input. What did you mean when you said "if you keep the blank that fat"...

Do you think they should be slimmer? I'm always looking for constructive criticism...no hurt feelings here.

Thanks
Geo
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:25 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by BSea View Post
Well, I think that proves that a slimline is certainly acceptable for this kind of segmenting. Nothing at all wrong with turning slimlines. I did 3 or 4 slimlines when I started turning, then quickly moved to the larger pens. But about a year ago, I started doing them again. Not all the time, but enough to know that they can be fun and really good looking. And like you said, they are really great to practice new ideas or skills.

Good Job!!
If you keep the blank that fat then sure. Not for my taste on that look. Just my opinion
Hi John... I'm just curious and I value your input. What did you mean when you said "if you keep the blank that fat"...

Do you think they should be slimmer? I'm always looking for constructive criticism...no hurt feelings here.

Thanks
Geo

In my opinion I am a bushing to bushing type person with a hint of bulge on some kits such as a Sierra kit. It is tough to do with a slimline because of the small waste or centerband on them. Alot of people do away with the centerband and make their own so they can now be more concentric. To me I do not like the waspy look. I think slimlines if used should be just that slim. There are far better kits and more of them that lend themselves to blanks that have details such as yours.

This is just my own opinion which is worthless. The key here is if you like it then it is fine. You have to please no one except yourself unless you contracted a job out.
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:28 PM   #14 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by BSea View Post
Well, I think that proves that a slimline is certainly acceptable for this kind of segmenting. Nothing at all wrong with turning slimlines. I did 3 or 4 slimlines when I started turning, then quickly moved to the larger pens. But about a year ago, I started doing them again. Not all the time, but enough to know that they can be fun and really good looking. And like you said, they are really great to practice new ideas or skills.

Good Job!!
If you keep the blank that fat then sure. Not for my taste on that look. Just my opinion
Hi John... I'm just curious and I value your input. What did you mean when you said "if you keep the blank that fat"...

Do you think they should be slimmer? I'm always looking for constructive criticism...no hurt feelings here.

Thanks
Geo

In my opinion I am a bushing to bushing type person with a hint of bulge on some kits such as a Sierra kit. It is tough to do with a slimline because of the small waste or centerband on them. Alot of people do away with the centerband and make their own so they can now be more concentric. To me I do not like the waspy look. I think slimlines if used should be just that slim. There are far better kits and more of them that lend themselves to blanks that have details such as yours.

This is just my own opinion which is worthless. The key here is if you like it then it is fine. You have to please no one except yourself unless you contracted a job out.
Hey John, I'm with you on how a slimline (using the centerband) looks best. I still think even turned down as you described, that the segmenting would be impressive. But I guess everything is subjective, and of course everyone has an opinion. My wife likes to tell me that I'm entitled to my opinion . . . . . . . . no matter how wrong it is.

And Geo, as far as a better (inexpensive kit), I'd suggest the trimline. Basically the same, just uses a thicker centerband. That way, you can have it about as thick as you show, but without the skinny centerband. Or just do what you did with the 2nd pen, and eliminate the centerband entirely.
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:39 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
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still so so new at this, but got some comfort pen center doodads and the comfort bushings to be able to get more breadth on slimlines.

should be able to turn a few this week. opens up a lot of design options.

IMHO due to the workable area left by the 7mm hole makes the slimline one of the more designer friendly kits out there. Looking forward to seeing if the new wider center brings added opportunities in turning a classic kit.

in the last month, I've done over a dozen, no two the same.

for one tubers, is there anything really better than the Sierra/Mesa/Lancer/WallStreet? haven't found it yet, but happy with those.
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:50 PM   #16 (permalink)
 
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Thanks for the input guys...it is truly appreciated. I'm not really a fan of the "waist" look as much... but the curvature does feel nice in the hand I think.

I've been reading up on eliminating the center band to avoid the narrowness there. I might just try that.

Lots of things to try here... most important to me is to make sure my turnings are perfectly round and perfectly dimensioned at the tip, center, and nib...

Those are the goals anyhow.

Thanks
Geo
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Old 04-10-2013, 09:37 AM   #17 (permalink)
 
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Hey Geo & John,

Being that you're both new, you might find this interesting. It's the slimline competion that was held in February of this year. All of these are made from slimlines.

3rd Annual Russ Fairfield Slim Line Pictures
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Old 11-20-2016, 05:58 PM   #18 (permalink)
 
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My first two segmented pens...

The finish is 20 coats of CA...then up to MM 12000. Got really excited when I saw the lustre at MM 4000...and I think it just got better from there.

These are some of my best yet...at least I think so. C&C welcomed and encouraged... I know I need work on photography.

Thanks
Geo
Lovely pens, what thickness sheet metal did you use?
Derek
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Old 11-20-2016, 09:37 PM   #19 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by EagleTa2 View Post
My first two segmented pens...

The finish is 20 coats of CA...then up to MM 12000. Got really excited when I saw the lustre at MM 4000...and I think it just got better from there.

These are some of my best yet...at least I think so. C&C welcomed and encouraged... I know I need work on photography.

Thanks
Geo
Lovely pens, what thickness sheet metal did you use?
Derek
Hello Derek and welcome to the IAP site and also to the wonderful world of segmenting. Unfortunately you stumbled onto a 3 year old thread and the OP has not been here in 3 years. He did answer that question though in his very first post in this thread. Sheet metal is not the choice of metals to use in segmenting. It is hard enough to keep a segmented blank together when turning and sheet metal will not be good. You want to use soft metals such as certain brass and aluminum. Thickness is not really a problem but want to use something that shows up well.

Anyway good luck and hopefully you do get into the art of segmenting.
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Old 12-01-2016, 01:14 PM   #20 (permalink)
 
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Thank you for that. I've now found the original post and got the info. I'm new to forums and finding it difficult to navigate my way around. It'll come with time.
Cheers Derek
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