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Old 02-06-2018, 09:11 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Carbide tool help!

Hey guys. I have a couple Carter hybrid axe tools. The rougher and finisher. I'm going to but the set of the woodpecker ultra shear turning tools. I i was all set to get the pen set. Cone to find out that the tips on the woodpecker tips are that same size tips as the Carter axe hybrid tips, so not I'm not sure if I should get a size up and get the mid size W.P tools. Or if the W.P. pen size would be better for what I'm doing. (Pens, sm. Bowls, drip tips, ear Gauges/plugs).
I've been sitting on the fence with this for a few Weeks. I've even asked the woodpecker company. The reply I got it's my preference. The only problem with that. Is I haven't used many sizes. The one thing I do know is that I want a set whether it's the pen or the midi size I don't know. But I know that I really like this brand.
So if anyone of you guys that could help me with this simple answer. That I can't seem to answer on my own. This will help me hugely. Thanks a ton!
James

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Old 02-06-2018, 11:02 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Hello James, if it was me getting them, I would get the larger size. By getting the larger size,you will have tools that will work on either size large or small. So you could turn pens with the larger size, and you could larger items with them also. Where if you just get the smaller size, your more apt to just use them on pens.
Len
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Old 02-07-2018, 10:05 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Hello James, if it was me getting them, I would get the larger size. By getting the larger size,you will have tools that will work on either size large or small. So you could turn pens with the larger size, and you could larger items with them also. Where if you just get the smaller size, your more apt to just use them on pens.
Len
Thanks for your thoughts.

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Old 02-07-2018, 10:27 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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I'm a bit confused about why you need to buy anything. If you already have a set of tools with the same size cutter why do you need another set?

I have a set of 'regular' size EWT carbide. I once had an opportunity to use a small set of another brand. I didn't like using the small tools at all.

I should point out, even though I have the carbide EWT I do 99.9% of my turning with HSS. In the past year I have used carbide only twice. Both times were to demonstrate them to other turners who had never tried them.
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Old 02-07-2018, 05:21 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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Hi Jim, I don't use hss tools all that much. I mostly make acrylic drip tips. There usually made on a metal lathe. I so it free hand but it has to be super precise. I've always used carbide, thats how I was learned how to do it. I've always have done it this way. That's also how I do my pens also. But I'm starting to so other things. So I wouldn't mine going bigger. I like the W.P. tools I wish I got them before. I need to buy a carbide detailer. They have two different detailing tips which usually Brands only have one. Also they have better tips than anything I've uses so far. Also they have a 45 shear angle for the shaft. (Takes the guessing out of things.) Jim I don't know if any of this helps or explains things. Thank you

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Old 02-07-2018, 05:23 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Hi Jim, I don't use hss tools all that much. I mostly make acrylic drip tips. There usually made on a metal lathe. I so it free hand but it has to be super precise. I've always used carbide, thats how I was learned how to do it. I've always have done it this way. That's also how I do my pens also. But I'm starting to so other things. So I wouldn't mine going bigger. I like the W.P. tools I wish I got them before. I need to buy a carbide detailer. They have two different detailing tips which usually Brands only have one. Also they have better tips than anything I've uses so far. Also they have a 45 shear angle for the shaft. (Takes the guessing out of things.) Jim I don't know if any of this helps or explains things. Thank you

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Ps. The reason I was thinking the pen size sometimes the tools to big to get were I want.

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Old 02-07-2018, 06:33 PM   #7 (permalink)
 
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I think you are asking for advice in choosing the size of the carbide cutter. You appear to have already decided that you want a smaller size for the overall tool (ie, a shorter handle).

Back in the day when Captain Eddy did his regular Saturday afternoon live show, there was a discussion on this subject. Eddy was promoting his cutters, but I think the basic principles apply to cutters from other suppliers. His summary was that if everything else is the same, a smaller cutter will be more aggressive than a larger cutter.

I've noted that there are a number of commercial hollowing tools that use a tiny carbide cutter - which seems to reinforce the Captain's summary.

I have two sizes of round carbide cutters in my tool collection. My experience is that the smaller round tool is very good for hollowing, while the larger round cutter seems better suited for finish smoothing. Once again, smaller is more aggressive than larger.

That would lead me to suspect that if I were inclined to make a set of small carbide tools for small work, I would probably expect to use a conventional rougher for turning to round, and then use the largest practical round cutter as a finishing tool.
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Old 02-07-2018, 09:38 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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My two cents!

It's not the size of the tool but how you use it. We had a chapter member, Steve DeYoung, who would turn goblets smaller then a AAA battery using a 1" skew. He has one of them on display in the Smithsonian.

Practice, practice, practice. Grab an 8' 2x2 and cut in 1' lengths to practice on. Use one as a warm up before turning a pen.
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Old 02-08-2018, 05:17 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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My two cents!

It's not the size of the tool but how you use it. We had a chapter member, Steve DeYoung, who would turn goblets smaller then a AAA battery using a 1" skew. He has one of them on display in the Smithsonian.

Practice, practice, practice. Grab an 8' 2x2 and cut in 1' lengths to practice on. Use one as a warm up before turning a pen.
That's would be cool to see.

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Old 02-08-2018, 05:18 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monophoto View Post
I think you are asking for advice in choosing the size of the carbide cutter. You appear to have already decided that you want a smaller size for the overall tool (ie, a shorter handle).

Back in the day when Captain Eddy did his regular Saturday afternoon live show, there was a discussion on this subject. Eddy was promoting his cutters, but I think the basic principles apply to cutters from other suppliers. His summary was that if everything else is the same, a smaller cutter will be more aggressive than a larger cutter.

I've noted that there are a number of commercial hollowing tools that use a tiny carbide cutter - which seems to reinforce the Captain's summary.

I have two sizes of round carbide cutters in my tool collection. My experience is that the smaller round tool is very good for hollowing, while the larger round cutter seems better suited for finish smoothing. Once again, smaller is more aggressive than larger.

That would lead me to suspect that if I were inclined to make a set of small carbide tools for small work, I would probably expect to use a conventional rougher for turning to round, and then use the largest practical round cutter as a finishing tool.
This helped slot thank you for you advice. I would have never know that with out asking or using the tool itself. Thanks man again!

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