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Old 09-25-2017, 01:21 PM   #11 (permalink)
 
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I kept my PM3520B because i cant turn 16 inch bowls on my metal lathe.
Don
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Old 09-25-2017, 01:35 PM   #12 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mecompco View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickR View Post
Yes, keep both until you are sure the metal lathe will do everything you want.

I use my metal lathe for wood all the time. Just set up a shop vac for collection but I only cut soft metals with carbide so don't need a lot of oil.


My only experience is with my ancient Craftsman--it has oil everywhere. Of course, it has Babbitt bearings, so it really likes the juice. Perhaps a newer machine would be easier to keep clean.


Good point. The mini lathes actually don't have that many oil points. I worked in a machine shop in the seventies and everything in the building was covered in oil and cooling fluid. I still remember the smell!
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Old 09-25-2017, 04:55 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Thanks for all the info. You have given me some things to consider.

Chris
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Old 09-25-2017, 06:25 PM   #14 (permalink)
 
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Burn Chuck, burn Butch and burn the wood lathe !!!

Just kidding...all the reasons above for hanging onto your wood lathe as well as using it for a buffing station.
I think it's also nice to 'keep your hand in' with the skills of using hand chisels. It is also much faster to get a bit of a shape other than b2b on your wood lathe.

Btw, It's nice to see Chuck and Butch posting again......I thought I was posting less and less but you guys have been very scarce..
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Old 09-25-2017, 06:36 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skiprat View Post
Burn Chuck, burn Butch and burn the wood lathe !!!

Just kidding...all the reasons above for hanging onto your wood lathe as well as using it for a buffing station.
I think it's also nice to 'keep your hand in' with the skills of using hand chisels. It is also much faster to get a bit of a shape other than b2b on your wood lathe.

Btw, It's nice to see Chuck and Butch posting again......I thought I was posting less and less but you guys have been very scarce..
I've been waiting for a subject I had a chance to offer up a bit of help on. Then Butch showed up........then YOU showed up Just havin' fun Steven.

To answer one of Butch's questions, there are all kinds and shapes of metal files to put coves and curves in a blank. My heros sent me some
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Old 09-26-2017, 04:04 AM   #16 (permalink)
 
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You said it Chuck , all you really need is an electric drill and some files to be a machinist , Skippy's the perfect proof of that but if you really want to be a "Penmaker" keep your wood lathe and turn a REAL handcrafted pen .
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Old 09-26-2017, 11:23 AM   #17 (permalink)
 
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All I've ever used for turning is a mini Metal Lathe. My first modification was to make a tool post to allow hand turning. For pens it works well. I do have to clean and oil it after turning wood when I want to turn metal, but that hasn't been an issue. The ability to adjust and align the head and tail stocks is certainly and advantage with the metal lathe. Drilling is also easier and more precise (IMHO) with a 3 jaw chuck and an larger diameter pass through in the headstock (MT3 >3/4" diameter). If you only turn small items and don't frequently go back and forth between metal and wood, the single lathe would certainly work. But how many times have you gotten rid of a tool and thought back and said that was a great decision?

Danny
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Old 09-26-2017, 12:48 PM   #18 (permalink)
 
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I keep a wood turning Lathe for bowls etc but find a metal turning Lathe much better in most cases for pen turning. An ER32 collet chuck is a very handy addition as well.
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Old 09-26-2017, 01:20 PM   #19 (permalink)
 
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I use my metal lathe for 75% of the pens I turn. The shavings and dust vacumn or blow off o.k. If I could have only one, I'd choose the metal lathe. If space and money are no problem, go for both.

Ben
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Old 09-27-2017, 03:51 AM   #20 (permalink)
 
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Unless you are cutting brass or aluminum for kitless pens, a wood lathe will do an awful lot of business for you. It is also much faster to set up. I started with a Craftsman 109 from the 40s turning wood exclusively. I got a wood lathe when I could afford to do so...and have since purchased a South Bend 9x42 metal lathe as I gravitated toward kitless work. Short version: Don't part with either. (Bad pun. Rephrase: "Part with each of them.") I am back and forth between the two frequently, use each every day - or nearly so - and each is valuable to me. If you can possible find the space, make room for both very valuable tools.
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