Do I buy a metal lathe for kitless pens - Page 3 - International Association of Penturners
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Old 07-07-2017, 12:55 PM   #21 (permalink)
 
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The only advantage I could see for buying a machinist lathe is if you plan to make perfectly smooth cylindrical pens and let the lathe make the pen for you. Or for being lazy/efficient about rounding square blanks. Beyond that, you can do everything else on a wood lathe just as well with a set of manual taps and dies for all the threaded connections.




With some simple modifications the metal lathe can make complex curves as well. I was able to design, make, and install a pattern tracer in an afternoon on my mini metal lathe.



One can also add a tool rest and turn by hand like a wood lathe.







Danny









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I'm certainly not dismissing that a metal lathe works for kitless pen turning, just stating in my opinion that it's an unnecessary upfront cost for someone starting out making kitless. A set of taps and dies and a steady hand work perfectly fine on a wood lathe. One can always upgrade later once they see a benefit to doing so, it's a lot harder to recover from expenses that could have been avoided.


Don't even need stead hands, place the tap in a drill chuck and hand tap from the tail stock,for dies, can get inexpensive round die holders ~$15 from a machinest supply and place in drill or collet chuck also in rail stock, and wala flawless tapping , you can also make a die holder from derlin or wood if so desire


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You just described exactly how I cut all the threads on my kitless pens. 1" die holders and taps all get mounted into my drill chuck and I manually rotate the head stock to cut the work piece. I started with handheld die holders and quickly learned you need 3 hands to keep it all aligned, lol.
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Old 07-07-2017, 01:44 PM   #22 (permalink)
 
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Since triple taps and dies are going to run you at least $225+ a set minimum in your location that would go a long way to the purchase of a metal lathe but what you also have to factor in is how much a lathe costs in Italy and what is available. Also note that a metal lathe is only the starting point because all the extra tooling for it costs a lot more. Even the equivalent to a wood lathe collet chuck is more. You may spend a couple thousand on the lathe and still have to spend two or more thousand on a collet chuck, collets, cutting tool holders, internal and external single point threading tools, drill chucks, centres an a whole lot more especially in a country that has a culture that doesn't have a lot people practicing wood and metalworking as hobbies. In the long run a metal lathe is a great tool to have and it can do a lot. In the short term though you can do everything you need to do on your wood lathe with the investment of some extra tools like the triple taps and dies until you know for sure you want to continue making kiltless.
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Old 07-07-2017, 02:36 PM   #23 (permalink)
 
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The only advantage I could see for buying a machinist lathe is if you plan to make perfectly smooth cylindrical pens and let the lathe make the pen for you. Or for being lazy/efficient about rounding square blanks. Beyond that, you can do everything else on a wood lathe just as well with a set of manual taps and dies for all the threaded connections.

With some simple modifications the metal lathe can make complex curves as well. I was able to design, make, and install a pattern tracer in an afternoon on my mini metal lathe.

One can also add a tool rest and turn by hand like a wood lathe.



Danny




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How do you follow the pattern?


I disconnect the threaded block from the cross slide allowing it to move freely. I then attach a spring to pull the cross slide to the pattern. I adjust the compound rest to 90 deg to the work and use it to advance the depth of cut.



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Old 07-07-2017, 04:08 PM   #24 (permalink)
 
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^ that's what the spring is for. Thanks!


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Old 07-07-2017, 05:08 PM   #25 (permalink)
 
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Since triple taps and dies are going to run you at least $225+ a set minimum in your location that would go a long way to the purchase of a metal lathe but what you also have to factor in is how much a lathe costs in Italy and what is available. Also note that a metal lathe is only the starting point because all the extra tooling for it costs a lot more. Even the equivalent to a wood lathe collet chuck is more. You may spend a couple thousand on the lathe and still have to spend two or more thousand on a collet chuck, collets, cutting tool holders, internal and external single point threading tools, drill chucks, centres an a whole lot more especially in a country that has a culture that doesn't have a lot people practicing wood and metalworking as hobbies. In the long run a metal lathe is a great tool to have and it can do a lot. In the short term though you can do everything you need to do on your wood lathe with the investment of some extra tools like the triple taps and dies until you know for sure you want to continue making kiltless.


I bought a cheap er collet and set off eBay and works great even checked with dial indicator

Don't buy the wood craft collet sets are non standard collets hence what you get is what you get and can't use other sizes


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