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Old 07-12-2018, 06:19 PM   #31 (permalink)
 
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... so easy to hone.

Somebody has pointed out that a scraper does not function because it is honed, it functions because there is a burr along the edge
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Old 07-12-2018, 07:00 PM   #32 (permalink)
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Honing is done with a stone or flat sharpening surface; Honing is refined sharpening; Burrs are added with a rod or steel after an edge is created, called burnishing. Honing a burr would remove it.

I have numerous square, rectangular and round shaped flat steel plates roughly 3" X 5" that are used as hand scrapers for smoothing boards and removing scratches instead of using sandpaper to make it very smooth. I use a steel tool (round rod) to burnish the edge which adds a burr to it.

To me, "most" Lathe scrapers should be burnished in this manner, but on my favorite scraper (I made it to my liking, angle and radius.) I don't burnish it, but the edge is SHARP. It was with this tool that I learned to turn blanks to the point that even 600 sandpaper would only add scratches.

I did try burnishing it once when I was in Japan and I didn't like the results. It was good but it was too aggressive. I went back to a flat back for finer control. If one knows what they want and can use it, burnishing a burr to a scraper is not absolutely necessary, but one should be aware that the burnishing adds an effect that might make it work better in many situations. But even this is a personal feel/choice.

Because I use scrapers so efficiently due to experience of 14 years and can control them so well, I use them. Necessity was the mother of inventive use!:D however, I have been intrigued by those that use a skew as a scraper. I would like to learn to use the skew in the way it is primarily intended. The skew will cut soft woods better than the scraper will, and cut down on the need for lots of sanding in those situations.
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Old 07-12-2018, 07:28 PM   #33 (permalink)
 
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To me, "most" Lathe scrapers should be burnished in this manner, but on my favorite scraper (I made it to my liking, angle and radius.) I don't burnish it, but the edge is SHARP. It was with this tool that I learned to turn blanks to the point that even 600 sandpaper would only add scratches.
That alone would justify the time needed to become proficient in using the skew in this manner, I should also point out that the skew excels at planing cuts that leave a wonderful surface hence the title of this thread Versatile skew.
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Old 07-12-2018, 09:32 PM   #34 (permalink)
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To me, "most" Lathe scrapers should be burnished in this manner, but on my favorite scraper (I made it to my liking, angle and radius.) I don't burnish it, but the edge is SHARP. It was with this tool that I learned to turn blanks to the point that even 600 sandpaper would only add scratches.
That alone would justify the time needed to become proficient in using the skew in this manner, I should also point out that the skew excels at planing cuts that leave a wonderful surface hence the title of this thread Versatile skew.
In general, That can be said to be true, however in my specific it would not. On harder surfaces/woods, the scraper often does a better job, as referenced in earlier statements from the late Russ Fairfield: "If you really want to see the extreme differences, try using a both scraper and skew on Cocobolo, Blackwood, or Desert Ironwood. You will find that the scraper might be the better tool for these very hard species. At the opposite extreme, the scraper will be a disaster on a soft wood like Douglas Fir or Pine, while a sharp skew can leave a smooth clean cut and polished surface that doesn't need sanding."

Your idea is that the planing cuts are better, but making planing cuts is not equal with all woods, especially with hard woods and brass, silver, aluminum in the segments. Here is where a scraper will shine over a properly used skew (not talking about using a skew as a scraper - which does not come close in those cases.) Yes, a skew is versatile for sure, but it is not the end all any more than a carbide insert or scraper is an end all.
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Old 07-12-2018, 10:34 PM   #35 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by leehljp View Post
To me, "most" Lathe scrapers should be burnished in this manner, but on my favorite scraper (I made it to my liking, angle and radius.) I don't burnish it, but the edge is SHARP. It was with this tool that I learned to turn blanks to the point that even 600 sandpaper would only add scratches.
That alone would justify the time needed to become proficient in using the skew in this manner, I should also point out that the skew excels at planing cuts that leave a wonderful surface hence the title of this thread Versatile skew.
In general, That can be said to be true, however in my specific it would not. On harder surfaces/woods, the scraper often does a better job, as referenced in earlier statements from the late Russ Fairfield: "If you really want to see the extreme differences, try using a both scraper and skew on Cocobolo, Blackwood, or Desert Ironwood. You will find that the scraper might be the better tool for these very hard species. At the opposite extreme, the scraper will be a disaster on a soft wood like Douglas Fir or Pine, while a sharp skew can leave a smooth clean cut and polished surface that doesn't need sanding."

Your idea is that the planing cuts are better, but making planing cuts is not equal with all woods, especially with hard woods and brass, silver, aluminum in the segments. Here is where a scraper will shine over a properly used skew (not talking about using a skew as a scraper - which does not come close in those cases.) Yes, a skew is versatile for sure, but it is not the end all any more than a carbide insert or scraper is an end all.
Take your point Hank, just love the way the skew as a scraper can remove the last thousandth or 2 to get that nice fit/transition. Many times I have encountered gnarly timbers and had to resort to Plan B or even C.
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