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Old 11-07-2017, 09:43 AM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Question Turning synthetics with a skew

Letting the knees rest a bit. I know there are several types of synthetics and I will use this word as a broad term. Does anyone use a skew for turning synthetics? I am using a 3/4 roughing gouge and getting a decent surface prior to sanding and polishing. I have read that a skew, on wood, can reduce sanding to a minimum. Your thoughts and advice are most welcome.
BTW, the members of this forum are a great bunch, very friendly, and willing to share their expertise and experience.
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Old 11-07-2017, 09:59 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Letting the knees rest a bit. I know there are several types of synthetics and I will use this word as a broad term. Does anyone use a skew for turning synthetics? I am using a 3/4 roughing gouge and getting a decent surface prior to sanding and polishing. I have read that a skew, on wood, can reduce sanding to a minimum. Your thoughts and advice are most welcome.
BTW, the members of this forum are a great bunch, very friendly, and willing to share their expertise and experience.
I start with a spindle gouge first. I turn it 45 degres and it seems to work really well for me. I am able to take a much more aggressive cut without chip out. I use the roughing gouge closer to the finished size.
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Old 11-07-2017, 11:02 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Woodchipper View Post
Letting the knees rest a bit. I know there are several types of synthetics and I will use this word as a broad term. Does anyone use a skew for turning synthetics? I am using a 3/4 roughing gouge and getting a decent surface prior to sanding and polishing. I have read that a skew, on wood, can reduce sanding to a minimum. Your thoughts and advice are most welcome.
BTW, the members of this forum are a great bunch, very friendly, and willing to share their expertise and experience.
I start with a spindle gouge first. I turn it 45 degres and it seems to work really well for me. I am able to take a much more aggressive cut without chip out. I use the roughing gouge closer to the finished size.
That's what I do. Gouge first then skew. Only difference than with wood is more caution. Synthetics do not all behave the same. Easy does it.
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Old 11-07-2017, 11:03 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Only if I am in a hurry to round the corners. I use carbide to get close to fine size and back to skew as a negative scraper for the final sizeing.
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Old 11-07-2017, 12:39 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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An oval skew is all I use ...unless the material is very hard than I will use carbide too start than switch back. I do round the corners first on my sander.
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Old 11-07-2017, 12:51 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
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I also use a rough gouge to get it round and close to the bushings. I then switch to a skew. I have 2 skews, a 5/8 and a 1 1/2, both from Alan Lacer. That said, I start sanding Alumilite pens at 1000 grit. The finish I get from a skew is amazing. Well worth the time to learn how to use it.


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Old 11-07-2017, 01:02 PM   #7 (permalink)
 
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I use a 1" skew for all my pen turning. I have used carbide, gouges etc but the failsafe for me is the skew - sharp and careful but it actually goes pretty fast!
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Old 11-07-2017, 02:28 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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John, I have observed that a couple of most excellent pen turners (Ed Davidson aka YoYo Spin and Ed Brown) on you tube vidios use skews with more steep (blunt) bevels on acrylics.

Have tried that and find it helps, especially with more brittle blanks. I just steepened up the platform and shortened the bevel length.

You might also develop the practice of measuring the components with calipers and using calipers to check blank sizes match the components.
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Old 11-07-2017, 02:55 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Yes, I use a skew for "final material removal" before sanding/polishing and use it more as a scraper. I usually use a replaceable carbide cutter tool prior to that for roughing.
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Old 11-07-2017, 03:04 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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You might also develop the practice of measuring the components with calipers and using calipers to check blank sizes match the components.
Worth a try. I did toss my old bushings for the Slimline pens. Got a new set.
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